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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 



CHELMSFORD 

1990 



IN MEMORIAM 

PAUL F. BARTEL 

Planning Board 
1972-1975 

REGINALD M. LARKIN 

Town Meeting Representative 
Precinct 8 
1989-1990 

BESSIE LEWIS 

School Committee 
1949-1952 

FREDERICK C. MARCKS 

Town Meeting Representative 
Precinct 5 
1989-1990 

JAMES J. McKEON 

Sewer Commission 
1972-1975 



Cover photo by: Jean M. Sougnez 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1990 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population 1990: 

Assessed Valuation Rate 1990 . 

Tax Rate: 



United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 



Children's House 



McKay Library . 



School Superintendent 
Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk 



Tax Collector & Treasurer 



Veterans' Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. 

It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 

Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

31,924 

$2,411,242,369 (Real Estate) 

$37,474,940 (Personal Property) 

Flat Rate $11.81 

($11.59 Residential -$12.40 Commercial) 

Chester G. Atkins, Concord 
Lucile C. Hicks, Wayland, MA 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday . . .9:00 a.m. -9:00 
p.m. 

Thursday 1:00 p.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday . . .9:00 a.m. -8:00 

p.m. 

Thursday — Closed 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday & Wednesday 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 1:00 p.m. -6:00 p.m. 

Thursday, Friday & Saturday . 9:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Tuesday in April 
Last Monday in April 
7:00 p.m. -every other Monday 
7:30 p.m. -every other Tuesday 
7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wednesday 
7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday 
8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tuesday 
7:00 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 
7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 



9 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




(Front) Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
J. Ready, Vice Chairman. 



Clerk; Bonita A. Towle, Chairman. (Rear) Bradford O. Emerson; Roger A. Blomgren; Dennis 



The Board of Selectmen held their 1990 re- 
organizational meeting on Monday, April 9, 1990 follow- 
ing the Annual Town Election on April 3rd in which Select- 
man Roger A. Blomgren was re-elected for a third term. 
Bonita A. Towle was elected Chairman, Dennis J. Ready, 
Vice Chairman and Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Clerk. Brad- 
ford O. Emerson and Mr. Blomgren held the fourth and 
fifth seats. 

1990 was the first full year under the Charter, and the 
year proved to be a learning experience for all. Town Meet- 
ing Representatives were kept busy with five sessions of an- 
nual and special town meetings along with separate pre- 
cinct meetings. 

The Board accepted with regret the resignation of Ernest 
Day, who retired as Town Accountant after 15 years. Over 
fifty resumes were received for the position and in October 
the Board appointed Lorraine Leone. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Northern 



Middlesex Council of Governments (formerly the Northern 
Middlesex Area Commission), the Middlesex County Ad- 
visory Board and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. 
Individual Selectmen also served as liaisons between the 
Board of Selectmen and various town and regional boards 
and commissions during the year. 

Due to the fact that national and state legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board of 
Selectmen maintained regular contact with Congressman 
Atkins' office as well as with Senator Lucile Hicks and State 
Representative Carol Cleven. Senator Hicks was elected in 
a Special Election in May and then in the regular Novem- 
ber election to replace Senator Carol Amick, who resigned 
in 1989. The Selectmen wish to express their gratitude to 
Congressman Atkins, Senator Hicks and Representative 
Cleven for their help and cooperation during the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford, wish to express their gratitude to the various 
Town boards and committees for their accomplishments 
during the year. It should be remembered that these boards 



and committees are composed of unpaid volunteers who 
take many long hours out of their free time to work on issues 
and projects that benefit the Town of Chelmsford. The 
Board would also like to recognize our competent and 
dedicated office staff of Judith Carter, Marian Currier, Beth 
Kinney and Elaine Casey, who joined the staff after the 
resignation of Mrs. Kinney. 

Bonita A. Towle, Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



TOWN MANAGER 

To The Citizens of Chelmsford: 

The calendar year of 1990 represented the close of the 
decade of the roaring 1980s and the beginning of a more 
economically subdued 1990s. The last several years have 
been financially difficult, and we can easily foresee serious 
and substantial retrenchment and down sizing of Town 
Government in the years ahead. This condition reflects the 
regional private economy which prospered in the 80s but 
now lies in a deep recession. 

These factors require that we find new and creative 
methods of financing and delivering governmental services. 
Often times such changes will not be popular to segments 
of the internal or external populations. However, it is clear 
in Chelmsford government, as well as Massachusetts 
government, that we can no longer afford to deliver ser- 
vices as we have done before. This is the challenge of the 
90s. 

The highlights of the calendar year 1990 include: 

• Presentation of the first consolidated executive 
budget 

• Preparation and townwide distribution of the first 
annual Citizens Guide to the Budget. 

• Implementation of a trash user fee that while not 
popular, will insure cost recovery of this service 



by the users. This action freed over $1.5 million 
for other town services. 

• The continuation of the Town's popular recycling 
program into a second year. 

• Completion of comprehensive pavement manage- 
ment plans and drainage study. 

• Settlement of the Police Contract. 

• Continuation of the "civilianization" of the police 
dispatch function which will lead to a con- 
solidated public safety dispatch center at a re- 
duced cost. 

• Transition of veterans agent to the Senior Center 
leading to a consolidated Human Service func- 
tion unit at reduced cost. 

• First billing of sewer users which will lead to full 
departmental cost recovery within 2-3 years. 

• Collection of substantial sewer betterments which 
can be used in the future to offset debt cost of 
the sewer project and thereby reduce the tax 
rate.. 

• Creation of a consolidated Finance Department 
which will improve the coordination of our over- 
all financial planning and our financial manage- 
ment. 

• Implementation of a successful user fee based 
summer recreation program. 

The consolidation of various Town departments is 
designed to reduce costs through staff and expense reduc- 
tions, and by improving coordination that will eliminate 
duplications. The Town must continue to pursue such op- 
tions thereby streamlining procedures and reducing 
overhead. 

The implementation of user fees allows the Town to pro- 
vide services without additional drain on the constrained 
Town Budget. With the current economic climate we must 
seek full cost recovery on all private and mixed good ser- 
vices that we provide. 

The overall effect of the consolidations, user fees, and 
general management improvements will be maintained and 
improved services. 

As I end the year, I wish to thank the Board of Select- 
men and various individuals who work or worked in the 
Executive Office during the year particularly Judy Carter, 
Marian Currier, Elaine Casey, and Beth Kinney. I look for- 
ward to working for the Town in 1991 on your behalf. 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Richard F. Burtt, Jr. Judith A. Olsson John F. Ketcham 

Chairman 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Ex Officio 

Voting strength as of December, 1990 

ENROLLED VOTERS 

TOTAL 

PRECINCT DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN UNENROLLED REGISTERED 

1 583 378 1,053 2,014 

2 641 432 1,254 2,327 

3 485 321 1,177 1,983 

4 665 367 985 2,017 

5 647 476 1,212 2,335 

6 563 438 1,110 2,111 

7 563 470 1,281 2,314 

8 605 356 1,094 2,055 

9 494 422 1,215 2,131 
TOTALS 5,246 3,660 10,381 19,287 



TOWN CLERK 

Sporting License Dog Licenses Kennel Licenses Recorded Mortgages 

1315 3001 9 582 

Birth inc. Deaths Marriages Intentions 

365 218 311 312 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL STATE 
PRIMARY ELECTION APRIL 3, 1990 



MIDDLESEX, SS 



To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 



Tuesday in said month, from 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m., 
for the following purpose: 



Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the inhabitants of said 
Chelmsford who are qualified to vote in the Special State 
Primary Election, to vote at: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



On Tuesday, the 3rd day of April 1990, being the first 



To bring in their vote in the Special State Primary Elec- 
tion for the following vacancy: 

For the candidate for Senate in the General Court, 
5th Middlesex District 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Given under our hands this 23rd day of March, A.D. 
1990. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

OF TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



SPECIAL STATE REPUBLICAN PRIMARY 



Pet 1 

SENATOR IN GENERAL CT 5th Middlesex to fill vacancy 
Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 151 

Markham H. Lyons 58 

Blanks 3 

TOTAL 212 



APRIL 3, 


1990 








ct 2 Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


130 181 


157 


262 


206 


243 



Pet 9 TOTAL 



SPECIAL STATE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY 
APRIL 3, 1990 



SENATOR IN GENERAL CT 5th Middlesex i 

Joseph W. Mullin 

Robert J. Waddick 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 

fill vacancy 



Pet 5 

200 



TOTAL 

1646 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 
TOWN ELECTION APRIL 3, 1990 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town 
of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, Viz: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7. 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



On Tuesday, the 3rd day of April, 1990, being the first Tues- 
day in said month at 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. for the follow- 
ing purposes: 



To bring in their vote for the following officers: 

One Town Moderator for three years 

One Selectman for three years 

One Member of Board of Health for three years 

Two Members of School Committee for three years 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Two Planning Board Members for three years 

Three Members of Public Library Trustees for three 

years 

Two Sewer Commissioners for three years 

One Sewer Commissioner for two years 

One Member of Housing Authority for five years 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Given under our hands this 23rd day of March, A.D. 1990. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

OF TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



'indicates cadidate for re-election 

TOWN MODERATOR 3 yr 
Dennis E. McHugh* 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

SELECTMAN 3 yr 
Rose A. Sergi 
Roger A. Blomgren* 
Richard P. Tevlin 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

BOARD OF HEALTH 3 yr 
Mark W. Gauthier* 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



TOWN ELECTION 
APRIL 3, 1990 



Pet 2 

423 



Pet 4 

473 



Pet 5 

549 



Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


TOTAL 


536 


452 


435 


4278 


144 


133 


133 


1230 



478 
202 



1042 
2509 
1645 



3971 
1537 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2) 3 yr 

Samuel Poulton* 

Judith B. Mallette 

Jeffrey W. Stallard 

Mary E. Frantz 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



305 
205 



367 
202 



293 
228 



1864 
3311 
1264 
2863 
1714 
11016 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 3 yr 

Charlotte P. DeWolfe* 

Blanks 



4108 
1400 



PLANNING BOARD (2) 3 yr 

Thomas E. Firth Jr.* 

Eugene E. Gilet* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY (3) 3 yr 

Suzanne E. White 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy* 

D. Lorraine Lambert* 

Lynda Reid Warren 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



312 


319 


373 


427 


433 


405 


386 


342 


347 


3344 


306 


343 


384 


354 


433 


411 


427 


375 


328 


3361 


1 


























1 


467 


404 


481 


417 


572 


508 


547 


453 


461 


4311 


1086 


1066 


1238 


1198 


1438 


1324 


1360 


1170 


1136 


11016 


240 


156 


223 


251 


322 


254 


259 


191 


281 


2177 


346 


268 


365 


341 


439 


423 


447 


341 


348 


3318 


324 


346 


419 


374 


420 


395 


429 


409 


312 


3428 


245 


305 


306 


249 


313 


285 


303 


301 


261 


2568 


474 


524 


544 


582 


663 


629 


602 


513 


502 


5033 


1629 


1599 


1857 


1797 


2157 


1986 


2040 


1755 


1704 


16524 



SEWER COMMISSION (2) 3 yr 

Robert E. Olson 

Robert E. Cole 

Richard J. Day 

Paul F. Ahern 

Robert P. Joyce* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISSION 2 yr 

Jeffrey A. Brem 

John F. Souza 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



252 
289 



275 
373 



223 
223 



223 


186 


211 


236 


237 


148 


205 


134 


323 


313 


317 


270 


374 


378 


354 


322 


438 


1324 


1360 


1170 


295 


325 


283 


229 


238 


185 


210 


213 



1507 
821 
1735 
1377 
2642 
2934 
11016 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 yr 

Ruth K. Delaney* 

Blanks 



496 
223 



476 
204 



3959 
1549 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 23, 1990 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. There were 157 Represen- 
tative Town Meeting members present. 

The Moderator explained the rules and procedures of 
the Representative Town Meeting format. He pointed out 
the fire exits located within the hall. 

Selectman Ready moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Ready 
moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator then read a list of the students elected 
as participants to the April 26, 1990 Student Government 
Day activities. They are as follows: 



Library Trustee 

State Senator 
Police Chief 
Ass't Police Chief 
Fire Chief 
Ass't Fire Chief 
State Representative 



Christine Maggio 
Jason Smyrloglou 
Patti Lee 
Bridget Maloney 
Michael Metivier 
Brenda Carroll 
Jeff Fuller 
Frank Soracco 



Town Moderator 
Board of Assessors 
Cemetery Commissioners 



Cemetery Superintendent 
Sewer Commissioners 



Board of Health 

Council on Aging Director 
Housing Authority 



Superintendent of Streets 
Building Inspector 
Veterans Agent 
Wiring Inspector 
Superintendent of Buildings 
Superintendent of Schools 
DPW Director/ Town Engineer 
Town Manager 
Finance Committee 



Town Clerk 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 
Selectmen 



Town Constable 
School Committee 



Planning Board 



Jamie Athanasoulas 
Evan Sheehan 
Lisa Podgur 
Judianne Rigazio 
Edward Morris 
Rebecca Edwards 
Joe McNiff 
Bill Christie 
Mike Woodlock 
Carrie Sougnez 
Melissa Quigley 
Jen Daly 
Dana Klayner 
Julie Wright 
Lisa Provencher 
Rob Carey 
Daron Shields 
David Smith 
Chad Woods 
Mike Todd 
Hilary Ward 
Dan Willman 
Rachel DeYoung 
Steve Datur 
Brent Popolizio 
Kim Monahan 
Laura Marcotte 
Brian Ritchie 
Andria Mitsakos 
Sara Siljanker 
Amy Hiltz 
Richard Burtt 
John Rega 
Mary Schmidt 
Kim Marsella 
Eric Pearson 
Stephanie MacDougall 
Jennifer Kalos 
Donna Sartz 
Karen Boss 
Josh Blagg 
Todd Lawrence 



The Town Meeting body acknowledged them with a 
round of applause. The Moderator reminded the Town 
Meeting Body that absentee ballots were available at the 
Town Clerk's Office for the up coming Special Town and 
State Election on May 1st. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 41 
of Chapter 653, Acts of 1989, relative to quarterly proper- 
ty tax billings. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the State 
passed an act which would allow the cities and towns to 
bill the residents of their communities quarterly for their 
property taxes. Presently the taxes are billed twice a year. 
The Finance Committee supported the motion. The Board 
of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 40 
of Chapter 653, Acts of 1989, relative to changes in assess- 
ment dates, for property tax billing purposes. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this will 
allow the Board of Assessors to extend the new growth 
assessment cut off date of January 1st to July 1st. This is 
one time revenue windfall which could result in f 50,000.00 
in tax monies. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen also recommended the ar- 
ticle. Robert Joyce asked how many other cities and towns 
have adopted this policy. Bernard Lynch said that it will 
be appearing on a lot of warrants this year. He knew that 
the Town of Andover and Lexington have accepted this. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 The Moderator read the article. 
The Town Manager explained that the Capital Planning 
Committee with his approval has prepared a list of pro- 
jects. The money being used is left over from projects of 
previous years. He further explained that once a project 
is approved with a certain amount of money that is the 
only item that the money can be spent on. If a bid comes 
in higher than anticipated then the project needs to be 
voted more money or it is never acted on. If a project costs 
less than the money appropriated, then any money left over 
must be voted on at a town meeting and used for another 
capital planning project. The Town Manager and the 
Board of Selectmen moved to delete item 1, the Optech 
voting machines, $34,600.00. And item 5, the pick up truck 
for the Sewer Department, $11,000.00 for a total article 
figure of $195,000.00. The Selectmen felt it would be bet- 
ter to wait and see what the results of the May 1st override 
questions would be. If layoffs or cut backs have to take place 
then extra vehicles may become available. The Finance 



10 



Committee is in favor of the motion to amend. The Town 
Manager was not in favor of deleting the pick up truck. 
He felt that there is a definite need. Presently there are 
two men and one truck. John Emerson of the Sewer Com- 
mission explained that the two employees very often have 
to be in different areas of the Town for hook ups or in- 
spections, the Town is paying mileage to one employee for 
the use of his vehicle. William Spence spoke in favor of the 
deletions. He suggested that the Sewer Department obtain 
an old cruiser for transportation. Lorraine Lambert wanted 
the Optech voting machines to appear on the June 4th 
Town Meeting warrant. The Moderator explained that if 
there was a Capital Planning article on the agenda then 
she could amend the article by adding the voting machines 
to it. Further discussion took place. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to delete items 1 & 5, mo- 
tion carried. Selectman Roger Blomgren moved to delete 
the remaining items in the article in their entirety. He felt 
that the items could be brought back at another time. The 
Finance Committee was not in favor of the motion. They 
felt that this was Capital Planning money being used, not 
operating money. Bernard Lynch explained that the money 
must be used for Capital Planning items only. The money 
cannot be put towards the budget or any other item. The 
unused money is gaining interest, the Federal government 
will soon be issuing penalties because it is not being used. 
Discussion took place. Town Treasurer James Doukszewicz, 
who is also a member of the Capital Planning Committee 
went through the list explaining why each item appeard 
on it. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to delete the article, motion defeated. Robert Joyce mov- 
ed to delete item 2, repairing the McCarthy Middle School 
tennis courts. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen were against the motion. A discussion took place, 
a lot of people spoke for and against the motion to defeat. 
Was there a real need considering the present money situa- 
tion? Concerns were expressed about the Town's liability 
if the courts are left unrepaired. Also this is one of the few 
public facilities in the town. Money has been invested 
already by building them. Barbara Ward moved the ques- 
tion to stop debate. The Moderator asked if there was any 
need to hear further debate? Hearing none, he asked for 
a voice vote on the motion to delete item, 2, motion 
defeated. He then went on to item 3. Andrew Silinish mov- 
ed the question to stop any further debate on the entire 
article. The Moderator attempted a voice vote which fail- 
ed, the following tellers came forward and a hand count 
was taken: 



Richard McClure 
Robert Burns 



Patrick Calnan 
Timothy O'Connor 



The Moderator explained this is to stop debate on the 
article. The result of the hand count: Yes 109, No 37, %'s 
is 96 motion carried to stop debate. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the article as amended minus items one 
and five, with the figure of $195,000.00. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the Town vote to 
transfer and appropriate the sum of $195,000.00 from 
unexpended proceeds of amounts authorized for capital 
planning project expenditure, under Article 13 of Annual 
Town Meeting 1987, Articles 11 and 13 of Annual Town 



Meeting 1988, and Articles 3 and 10 of Annual Town 
Meeting 1989, for the following purposes: 

1. School Department Repair 
McCarthy Middle School Tennis 

Courts $60,000.00 

2. Furniture for three classrooms 10,000.00 

3. Public Buildings Mandatory 

removal or upgrade of oil tanks 25,000.00 

4. Drainage Projects 75,000.00 

5. Replace carpenting at Adams 

Library and Children's House 13,000.00 

6. Pipe, ceiling, and lighting work in 

Adams Library 12,000.00 

$195,000.00 

Lorraine Lambert moved to reconsider the article. She 
wanted to add the Optech Voting Machines back into the 
article. The Finance Committee did not support recon- 
sideration. There will be opportunity on another Capital 
Planning article to take up the question of the voting 
machines. The Board of Selectmen did not recommend 
reconsideration. It could be taken up at the Annual in June. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate the sum 
of $204,319.00 from free cash in the Treasury to line item 
141, County Retirement Assessment. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained this was the 
balance due from what was paid at the October meeting. 
The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen sup- 
ported the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 The Moderator read the article. 
Chairman of the Sewer Commission Barry Balan explained 
the article. This would allow any condominium develop- 
ment with 200 or more units who do not front on public 
sewer, to be able to extend their private sewer line to the 
public sewer line and pay a privilege fee. The owners will 
be allowed to apportion these payments over five years in- 
cluding interest. As a result of apportionment a lien will 
be placed on each individual unit, which would guarantee 
five year's of payment to the Town. All other developments . 
under 200 units and individual home owners who extend 
private sewer to public sewer and do not front public sewer, 
will have to pay the privilege fees up front before any con- 
nection is allowed, which would be 60% of the betterment 
fee. A lengthy discussion took place. Many questions were 
asked and answered. Richard DeFreitas moved the ques- 
tion to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to stop debate, motion carried, unanimously. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article. Mo- 
tion carried unanimously, and reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission Barry Balan moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Sewer Com- 
mission Betterments Assessments and Sewer Privilege Fees, 
dated September 8, 1986, as prepared by Weston & Samp- 
son Engineers, copies of which are on file with the office 
of the Board of Selectmen and Town Clerk as follows: 



11 



1. Under Section 3.2.2. subtitled "Non-Residential, 
Developed," delete subsection 3.2.2.2. and 
substitute the following in its place: 



3.2.2.2. 



Non-residential buldings which are metered for 
water use shall comprise a number of sewer 
units based upon water consumption using the 
following formula: 

Non-residential water usage equivalent 



in gallon per day (gpd) 
300 gpd/sewer units 



number of 
sewer units 



(All decimal numbers shall be rounded up to 
the nearest whole number.) 

Non-residential water usage in the above for- 
mula shall be based upon an average of the past 
two years water use. If less than two years of 
metered water consumption records are avail- 
able, water use will be based on Title 5 (Part 
2, Section 13) of the State Environmental Code 
for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Mini- 
mum Requirements for the Subsurface Disposal 
of Sanitary Sewage. 

2. After Section 3.2.4. subtitled "Non-Residential, 
Undeveloped," add a new section 3.2.5. subtitled 
"Dual Use Properties" and a new subsection 
3.2.5.1. as follows: 

3.2.5. Dual Use Properties 

3.2.5.1. Properties having both residential and non- 
residential uses shall be assessed based on the 
total number of units for the residential por- 
tion and the non-residential portion, based on 
Section 3.2.1. and 3.2.2. respectively, with an 
allowance made for residential water use. Dual 
use properties shall have a minimum assessment 
of two sewer units. 

3. Under Section 5.1. subtitied "Private Sewer Ex- 
tension," delete the last sentence of the first 
paragraph and insert in its place the following: 

Sections 4.2. and 4.5. of these regulations shall 
govern a property owner's method of payment. 

4. Under Section 5.2. subtitled "Public Sewers on 
Unaccepted Ways," amend the subtitle to read 
"Public Sewers on Unaccepted Ways and 
Easements," delete the section in its entirety and 
insert in its place the following: 

If a property abuts a private unaccepted way 
or easement within which a public sewer has 
been installed, or if a property lies within one 
hundred (100) feet of a public sewer located 
within a private or unaccepted way or ease- 
ment, the Town shall assess a sewer privilege 
fee in lieu of a betterment assessment against 



said property. The sewer privilege fee shall be 
equivalent to the betterment assessment value 
pertinent to said property as determined follow- 
ing procedures outlined in Section 3 of these 
regulations and shall be levied at the time of 
connection to the public sewer. Section 4.2. and 
4.3. of these regulations shall govern the 
method of payment. 

5. Under Section 5.3. subtitled "Compensatory 
Sewer Privilege Fee," delete the entire paragraph 
and insert in its place the following: 

5.3 Compensatory Sewer Privilege Fee 

In situations where (1) a betterment has been 
assessed to an undeveloped property based 
upon the estimated number of developable 
sewer units as required by these regulations and 
said property is ultimately developed to accom- 
modate a number of sewer units in excess of the 
number estimated for determining the better- 
ment assessment and (2) a betterment has been 
assessed to a developed parcel and later in time 
the use of that parcel is increased to accom- 
modate a number of sewer units in excess of the 
number estimated for determining the better- 
ment assessment, the Town shall assess a com- 
pensatory sewer privilege fee to reflect the in- 
creased use. This fee shall be equivalent to that 
sum of money that would have been charged 
as a betterment assessment upon the additional 
sewer units at the time of the original assess- 
ment. Sections 4.2 and 4.5 of these regulations 
govern the method of payment. 

6. Apportionment of Privilege Fees 

Property owners in condominium developments 
exceeding 200 units shall have the option to 
finance privilege fees through apportionment. 
The interest rate charged by the Town shall be 2 
percent greater than the project bond rate being 
paid by the Town for the public sewer construc- 
tion project in the area of the condominium 
development. Apportionment under this section 
shall not exceed 5 years and shall constitute a 
municipal lien on said property until the 
privilege fee is fully paid. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 William Dalton moved that the 
Town vote to approve the filing of a petition in the General 
Court for an act relative to Reduction in Ranks for certain 
Public Employees in the Town of Chelmsford, said act to 
be filed in the following form: 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO REDUCTION IN 
RANK FOR CERTAIN PUBLIC EMPLOYEES 
IN THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the 
same as follows: 



12 



Section I: Notwithstanding the provisions of sec- 
tion thirty- three of the General Laws or the first 
sentence of section thirty-nine of Chapter thirty- 
one of the General Laws or of any other general 
or special law or rule to the contrary, if perma- 
nent employees of the fire force of the Town of 
Chelmsford serving in any position in a title 
above the lowest title on such force are to be 
separated from such positions because of lack of 
money or the abolition of such positions, they 
shall be separated from such positions according 
to their seniority in such title after permanent 
promotion in such force and shall be reinstated 
to such positions held by them according to such 
seniority; provided, however, that this section 
shall apply only to reductions in force resulting 
in demotions from titles above the lowest title on 
such force and shall not affect the seniority of 
any employee in service for any other purpose, 
including but not limited to, the separation of 
permanent employee from service on such force. 

Section II. This act shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

The Moderator read into the minutes a letter that was 
received from Mirick, OGonnell, DeMallie & Lougee, Law 
Office, where the Town's Labor Counsel is from, dated 
"April 20, 1990 to Thomas Horton, Esq. Ass't Town 
Counsel: 

Re: Seniority Article on Chelmsford Town Meeting 
Warrant 

Dear Mr. Horton: 

This letter addresses our concerns regarding the proposal 
that an article be placed on the Chelmsford Town Meeting 
Warrant that would change the seniority rights of certain 
Town employees. 

The Warrant Article provides that those permanent 
employees of the firefighting force of Chelmsford who serve 
in any position in a rank above the lowest rank on the force 
(firefighter) shall be separated from such positions accord- 
ing to their seniority in their rank after permanent pro- 
motion in the force. The provisions are applicable only 
when an employee is separated from his position because 
of lack of money or the abolition of his position. The War- 
rant provides that reinstatement shall be in the same 
manner. 

The Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Town 
and Local 1839, IAFF, governing the terms and conditions 
of employment for firefighters, however, states that the 
seniority provisions of the Civil Service Law shall apply to 
all permanent employees of the firefighting force. The Civil 
Service Law provides that employees shall be separated 
from their positions according to their seniority in their 
department and not rank as proposed in the Warrant 
article. 

The proposed change in seniority rights would, there- 
fore, override the seniority provisions of the Collective 



Bargaining Agreement and may constitute a prohibited 
practice by the Town under Chapter 150E of the General 
Laws (the "Act") by interfering with the collective bargain- 
ing contract. Seniority rights, and the manner of reduc- 
ing the work force is a mandatory subject of bargaining 
under the Act. In a similar case involving mandatory sub- 
jects of bargaining, the Town of Bellingham bypassed the 
ongoing, collective bargaining negotiations with a Union 
and placed an Article on the Town Warrant which pro- 
posed changes in the hours and wages of town employees 
represented by the union. Council 93 AFSCME and Town 
of Bellingham, 9 MLC 1687 (1983). (Of course, it is well 
established that hours and wages of employees are man- 
datory subjects of bargaining.) The Commission found that 
the Town violated its statutory obligation to bargain in good 
faith. The Commission, citing an earlier case Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, 4 MLC 1869, (1978) held, 
"a public employer cannot supersede the collective bargain- 
ing process by unilaterally placing a mandatory subject of 
bargaining before the Town Meeting and recommending 
passage before the parties have satisfied the bargaining 
obligation." 9 MLC at 1690. 

While not completely free from doubt, we believe that 
the Weymouth School Committee and NAGE, 9 MLC 

1091 (1982) case exception is not applicable to our issue 
because that case involved a local option law. In the 
Weymouth case, the Commission held that the Town did 
not violate its duty to bargain when it sought voter revoca- 
tion of the Civil Service Statute because the Town Meeting 
has exclusive jurisdiction over the revocation of local op- 
tion laws, thereby, no bargaining is required. In our case, 
the Union is not petitioning the Town Meeting to accept 
or revoke the seniority provisions of a local option law but 
the union is attempting to change the seniority provisions 
contained in the General Laws. Therefore, there is an 
obligation to bargain between the Town and Union over 
such change. 

In the negotiations for the current agreement, the union 
proposed to eliminate from the agreement the provision 
which specifies that seniority rights would be regulated by 
Civil Service Rules. However, the parties, after bargaining 
over this issue, did not include the Union proposal in the 
current agreement. Now, the union, by petitioning the 
Town Meeting, appears to be attempting to secure from 
the Town Meeting what they could not achieve at the 
bargaining table. As expressed in Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts, 4 MLC 1869 (1978), "a party cannot supersede 
the collective bargaining process by unilaterally placing a 
mandatory subject of bargaining before the Town Meeting." 
The union's petition is, therefore, inappropriate. 

Since the issue of seniority is a mandatory subject of 
bargaining, any change in the Agreement's provision 
regarding seniority would have to be accomplished through 
the collective bargaining process and not the Town 
Meeting. Therefore, the seniority issue should be referred 
to the Town Manager in his charter capacity as the Town's 
representative for collective bargaining. It should be noted, 
however, that since there is a current agreement between 
the parties, neither party has the right to force a modifica- 
tion of the Agreement at this time. The Agreement only 



13 



provides for modification at the end of the term of the 
Agreement. 

If you have any further questions on this matter, please 
feel free to contact me. 

Sincerely yours, D.M. Moschos" 

The Moderator then asked the Town Counsel to deter- 
mine if the article is proper. James Harrington, Town 
Counsel explained that this article came before the Town 
Meeting Body via petition. It meets all of the technical re- 
quirements for the town meeting vote to petition the 
General Court for a special act. He summarized the labor 
counsel's letter. "There is concerns that this is a negotiable 
item that has been negotiated between union and the Town. 
The Town's negotiation agent is the Town Manager and 
that there is a contract." He cited chapter 150E which states 
"that the Town Manager will negotiate on behalf of the 
Town, the Fire Department's union will have their 
negotiator, they will then come together with a contract 
which will be presented in it's entirety to the Town to be 
voted on." Labor Counsel in his letter is arguing the fact 
that this is an attempt to try to negotiate the contract on 
a piece meal basis before this Town Meeting. This is not 
the procedure that has been followed in the past and he 
questions the legality of this. It is Town Counsel's opinion 
"that in the event this Town Meeting should vote to peti- 
tion the General Court for this special act, we would then 
ask the House Counsel to make a determination as to the 
legality. It is the recommendation of our labor counsel that 
the negotiation of any contract with any union in the town 
should be done at the negotiation table with the Town 
Manager who is our negotiating agent and the negotiating 
agent that is set forth by the union." James Boermeester 
came forward and stated that this article was submitted 
by him and had nothing to do with the Fire Department's 
union. He is a Captain on the Fire Department, and that 
this particular situation will effect him if there are any 
layoffs etc. Presently the civil service law states senority is 
based on the date that you came on the force. The present 
structure of the Department is one chief, two deputies, and 
five captains, those are the only members that this par- 
ticular article will effect. It will not effect the private fire- 
fighter, just the senior officers and no ones total senority. 
Currently one deputy chief who has eighteen years on the 
force which includes nine years as deputy chief is considered 
the senior deputy. The second deputy chief has twenty- three 
years on the force which includes one year as deputy chief. 
Under the Civil Service law if one deputy chiefs position 
was to be eliminated then the deputy chief with the least 
amount of years in total service, regardless of the amount 
of years in the position of deputy chief, will be reduced 
to the rank of captain. That will cause a trickle down ef- 
fect throughout the captains. Currently Captain 
Boermeester who has thirteen years on the force which in- 
cludes four as captain is third in rank. Another captain 
has 13 years and six months on the force with only one year 
as captain. If the deputy chief position is eliminated then 
that person will become a captain and Captain Boer- 
meester would be returned to the ranks of firefighter be- 
cause he has less years in service, even though he has held 
the captain position longer. Captain Boermeester discuss- 
ed this with Carol Cleven the Town's State Representative, 



who told him to approach the Town Manager to place this 
on the Town Meeting warrant as a homerule petition. The 
Town Manager felt that this should be a negotiated item 
to be bargained for. Captain Boermeester disagreed be- 
cause the two deputy chiefs are non-union members. These 
positions are under the Personnel Board's jurisdiction. Only 
the captains are union members. The only thing ever dis- 
cussed during negotiations was that if layoffs occurred then 
they would be based on years of service. He gave an exam- 
ple, if a layoff would occur even though he was a captain, 
if a private had more years of service then the private would 
stay on the force and he would be laid off. He didn't under- 
stand why the labor counsel questioned the article, through 
legislation the City of Springfield and Holyoke have already 
enacted this article. The Springfield wording is the same 
as this article. He has spoken to the two people with the 
longest years in service in the positions that could be ef- 
fected and they agree it should be time in the grade not 
time on the job that determines demotion. He asked for 
the Town Meeting body's support. The Finance Commit- 
tee did not recommend this article. They believe it is a 
negotiated item. Selectmen Ready said that the majority 
of the Board of Selectmen supported the article. They 
would like to see it in place, they agree that it is only fair 
that senority be done within the job grade. They feel that 
it is good for the union and good for the town. James Sousa 
who is one of the Deputy Chiefs confirmed that was said 
and asked for support. Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
stated that he agreed with the labor counsel's opinion. He 
feels that it is a collective bargaining issue. He feels that 
it will effect all members of the force, personnel and union 
members and that it could cause a violation of the con- 
tract. A discussion took place. Questions were asked if this 
was ever discussed during negotiations. Only the years of 
total service on the force would be determine for layoff were 
discussed. The issue of years in grade wasn't discussed as 
a factor. Samuel Poulten supported the article. He felt if 
there was a legal problem then let the House and Senate 
determine it. William Dalton said that all fifty-seven 
members of the Fire Department signed the petition and 
supported the article. More discussion took place. 

Selectman Emerson moved the question. The Moderator 
asked if there was a need for further debate hearing none 
he asked for a voice vote on the motion, which left the chair 
in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to convey for the consideration of 
518,025.00 all right, title and interest, if any, held by the 
Town in a certain parcel of land located off Riverneck Road 
in Chelmsford, containing approximately 5507 square feet 
of land, more or less and being the same property, more 
fully described as Parcel B. on a Plan of Land entitled "Plan 
of land in Chelmsford, Massachusetts prepared for the 
Chelmsford Cemetery Department, March 24, 1990, by 
McGlinchey Associates, Inc. on file with the Town Clerk. 

Town Counsel James Harrington explained that Walter 
Arsenault, an abutter to the cemetery land was interested 
in purchasing the land. He had put an addition on his 
home and he needed the land in order to have his lot con- 
form to the zoning. It was land that was to provide excess 
to Riverneck Road for expansion of the bank part of the 



14 



Pine Ridge Cemetery. A fee was negotiated subject to Town 
Meeting approval and contingent upon the ability of the 
Cemetery Commissioners to purchase other land for ex- 
cess onto Riverneck Road. A purchase and sell has been 
negotiated. The Finance Committee because it had already 
been negotiated was in favor of the article. The Board of 
Selectmen supported the article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectmen Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire in fee simple by purchase, eminent domain, or 
otherwise, for cemetery purposes, a certain parcel of land 
situated on Lexington Street, off Riverneck Road in 
Chelmsford described as lots 197 and 198 as shown on a 
plan entitled "Otis Adams Plan" recorded in the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds, in Plan Book 7, Plan 27, 
containing 5,000 square feet of land more or less being the 
same premises conveyed to Peter Saras by Helen Saras in 
a deed dated October 31, 1988, recorded in the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2671, Page 532 
and vote to transfer and appropriate the sum of $3,750.00 
from the Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund, 
to defray all necessary costs, fee and expenses in connec- 
tion with the acquisition of said land. 

Town Counsel James Harrington explained that the 
money from the previous article will be transferred to the 
Cemetery Trust fund and be used to purchase this land. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article, and 
noted that this is Cemetery Trust Funds monies being spent, 
not Town monies. The Board of Selectmen were in favor 
of the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote as required by Article 97 of Amend- 
ments to the Constitution of Massachusetts, to approve the 
filing of a petition in the General Court, for an Act 
authorizing a sewer easement crossing on conservation land 
off Mill Road, Chelmsford, said easement shown as Ease- 
ment 65 PI on a plan entitled Plan of Sewer Easement in 
Chelmsford, Ma, Phase IIB Sewers, dated February 1990, 
prepared by Richard F. Kominski & Assoc, Inc. on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

A question was asked if this would affect the soccer fields. 
Chairman of the Sewer Commission, Barry Balan explain- 
ed it would not, the line would be 150 feet away from the 
fields. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

There being no further business at hand, the Moderator 
declared the meeting adjourned at 10:25 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch, gave a presentation ex- 
plaining the budget that will be on the June 4th Annual 
Town Meeting. He also explained where the Town would 
be financially if the two override questions did not pass 
at the Special Town Election of May 1st. Many questions 
were asked and answered. 



15 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL 
STATE ELECTION MAY 1, 1990 

MIDDLESEX, SS 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the inhabitants of said 
Chelmsford who are qualified to vote in the Special State 
Election, to vote at: 



On Tuesday, the 1st day of May 1990, being the first Tues- 
day in the said month, from 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m., 
for the following purpose: 

To bring in their vote in the Special State Election for 
the following vacancy: 

For the candidate for Senate in the General Court, 
5th Middlesex District 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Given under our hands this 6th day of April, A.D. 1990. 



Precinct 1. 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7. 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

OF TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 
May 1, 1990 



Pet 1 

SENATOR IN GENERAL CT 5th Middlesex to fill vacancy 

Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 668 

Joseph W. Mullin 374 

All Others 

Blanks 18 

TOTAL 

On Friday, May 11th ; 



Pet 6 

754 



i out of the Country Ballot 



1060 953 

i opened and added 



1135 1052 1200 1160 1234 

i Pet S's total of Lucile Hicks and the final total per MGL 54 : 



Pet 9 TOTAL 



6461 
3363 



16 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL 
TOWN ELECTION MAY 1, 1990 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



Question 1: Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess 
an additional $1.4 million in real estate property taxes for the 
purposes of funding the Town's municipal and public schools 
operating budgets for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1990? 



To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town 
of Chelmsford: 



YES 
NO 



Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, Viz: 



Precinct 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7. 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



On Tuesday, the 1st day of May, 1990, being the first Tues- 
day in said month at 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. for the follow- 
ing purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following questions: 



Quetion 2: Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess 
an additional SI. 8 million in real estate and personal proper- 
ty taxes for the purposes of funding municipal/household solid 
waste collection for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1990? 



YES 
NO 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Given under our hands this 6th day of April, A.D. 1990. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

OF TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
MAY 1, 1990 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 



QUESTION" 1 (1.4 Million) 



Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 2 (1.8 Million) 
Yes 



444 
636 



342 
739 



664 



630 
643 



Pet 9 TOTAL 

592 5085 

580 5477 

4 75 

1176 10637 



4864 
5683 



17 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
JUNE 4, 1990 

The Annual 

Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 p.m. at the 
McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, by the Moderator 
Dennis E. McHugh. There were 155 Representative Town 
Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator pointed out the fire exits and explained 
that the warrant articles as posted is just the notice of ac- 
tion to take place. The motion is the actual wording of the 
article that will be presented and voted on during the 
meeting. He further explained the rules and procedures 
of amending and voting on articles. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Towle 
moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

Chairman of the School Committee Wendy Marcks asked 
permission from the Moderator to allow Superintendent 
William Mullen and Thomas Carroll to be able to address 
the body if need be from time to time concerning any and 
all school issues. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Bonita towle moved 
that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town Officers 
and Committees. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the Fiscal 
policy Advisory Committee was established per Special 
Town Meeting vote in October of 1989. The Committee 
was to investigate the financial conditions of the Town and 
to make recommendations to the Board of Selectmen/Town 
Manager on the appropriate action needed to solve the 
fiscal crisis problem. He read an excerpt from the com- 
mittee's final report: 

The Fiscal Policy Advisory Committee recommends: 

(a) that the town officials work, in cooperation with 
other communities, to force the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to provide predictable levels of fun- 
ding, and to fully fund mandated programs. 

(b) that the Board of Selectmen or the appropriate 
body actively consider whether the Town should 
withdraw from participation in the Nashoba Valley 
Technical School and instead "tuition in" students 
and cover transportation costs as required by law. 

(c) that the Board of Selectmen investigate Alternative 
Service Delivery Mechanisms: (for example, 
privatization, regionalization). 

(d) that the Olde Town Hall be sold or leased to receive 
revenue of approximately 1% per year of its assess- 
ed value. 



(e) that the North Town Hall be sold or leased and that 
the revenues received from said sale or lease be ap- 
plied towards the funding of Town budget in FY 93. 

(f) that the Center School be retained as Town property 
and continue to be leased. 

(g) that the Town officials accurately determine the 
number of business vehicles principally garaged in 
Chelmsford and take appropriate action to ensure 
maximum tax revenues. 

(h) that th appropriate body increase various fees, per- 
mits and licenses to the maximum allowed by law 
and, where no limit has been established, to a 
reasonable amount in order to attain full cost 
recovery within every department. 

(i) that trash collection be supervised by the ap- 
propriate existing department and become 
self-supporting. 

(j) that Sewer Betterment Revenue be applied to the 
operating budget of town government. 

(k) that the Town Officials initiate an outreach pro- 
gram to businesses which abut the Town sewer line, 
giving business owners the option to tie into the line 
for the appropriate fee. 

(1) that all Town boards work for legislation which will 
have a fair and equitable classification structure for 
business and industry. 

(m) that Town Meeting be delayed until June to allow 
sufficient time for accurate determination of state 
and allocations and resulting shortfalls in order to 
support informed decisions with respect to the Town 
budget. 

(n) that there be an April ballot question for an over- 
ride of Proposition 2V£ for an amount equal to the 
remaining budgetary shortfall. 

Samuel Poulten moved that the report be accepted as 
read. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
S4.680.00 with which to meet bills of previous years. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that this was 
a housekeeping article. This was a contractual obligation 
from 1986 which had to be paid. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
S22, 500.00 to engage a private accounting firm to prepare 
an audit of all accounts in all departments in the Town 
of Chelmsford. 



18 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that this was 
for the Fiscal Year 1991 audit. It was required by law to 
be done. The Finance Committee supported the motion. 
Roger Blomgren asked how this was going to be funded? 
Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the money 
would come from the general fund. Roger Blomgren ask- 
ed the body to defeat the article and have the money ap- 
pear in the budget article. He feels that this is a standard 
operating expense and it should be listed as such and not 
be a separate article. Bernard Lynch explained that it could 
appear in the budget or as a separate article. It has been 
acted on as an article in previous years. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, which left the chair in doubt. He 
then asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Town Treasurer James 
Doukszewicz moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to enter into compensatory balance 
agreements, during Fiscal Year 1991, as permitted by 
General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 53F. 

Town Treasurer James Doukszewicz explained the arti- 
cle. The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
supported the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Town Treasurer James 
Doukszewicz moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1990, 
in accordancec with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44 Section 17 and 17(a). 

Town Treasurer James Doukszewicz explained that come 
August and February of each year the Town must borrow 
against the monies anticipated from the tax revenues. Now 
that the quarterly tax bills are going to go into effect begin- 
ning July 1st and depending on when the state aid money 
arrives, the Town may not have to borrow in the fall. The 
Finance Committee supported the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved to postpone action under 
articles 5, 7, & 8 until 7:30 p.m. on June 18, 1990. Robert 
Sexton questioned if this motion could be debatable. The 
Moderator explained that if an article is postponed to a 
certain time then it is debatable, however, if an article is 
just tabled, then it cannot be discussed and a vote must 
be taken immediately. Town Manager Bernard Lynch ex- 
plained that these articles are budget items that can and 
should be delayed until the result of the state aid monies 
from the court case can be established. He feels by June 
18th the Town should know the status. Dwight Hayward 
of the Finance Committee said that the Finance Commit- 
tee is in favor of the motion because of the state aid ques- 
tion and the information will be right up to date on the 
local receipts taken in. Edward Cady moved to amend the 
motion to include in the postponement of articles 6, 7, & 
8, articles 13 and 14. The Finance Committee does not 
recommend adding articles 13 & 14 to the motion. They 



feel that these two articles do not pertain to monies and 
can be dealt with immediately. Articles 6, 7 & 8 could 
possibly take up the entire evening of June 18th. The body 
shouldn't put off acting on any article unless it is neces- 
sary because of the time factor. The Town must have a 
balanced budget in place by July 1st in order to operate. 
The Moderator asked the Board of Selectmen for their opi- 
nion on the motion to delay. Selectman Towle asked to hear 
the proponent's reasoning. Edward Cady explained that 
these two articles pertain to the trash situation. He received 
a lot of calls, people are confused and concerned about 
the proposed tag and bag system, and the yearly fee. If 
these articles are delayed perhaps a change may be in- 
stituted. The Board of Selectmen supported the motion 
to delay these two articles. Michael Anthony of the Solid 
Waste Advisory Committee explained that these two articles 
are about adopting mechanisms to be used in order to han- 
dle the trash situation, not the proposed tag and bag 
system. Robert Sexton spoke in favor of the amendment 
to postpone articles 13 & 14. He feels that they do deal with 
the budget, specifically the trash issue. Whatever happens 
in the budget affects these two articles. He explained why 
he wanted this motion to be debatable and amendable. 
He hoped it would provide feedback to the officials who 
now may want to reconsider some of their previously held 
positions. Samuel Brink asked the Town Manager to ex- 
plain his recommendation of where the 1.1 million will be 
best spent, there are two or three areas that need more 
money, what would his plan be. Bernard Lynch first ex- 
plained that he didn't have a stand either way on the post- 
poning of articles 13 & 14. They are in fact just implemen- 
tation mechanisms for solid waste users fee. They are not 
absolutely necessary and essential for a solid waste user's 
fee to be put in place. Solid waste user's fee can be put in 
place without these articles. These are some mechanisms 
for putting some teeth into the fee system. As for the 1.1 
million dollars coming from the Brookline decision, this 
money is what the Department of Revenue terms as a one 
time windfall to the town. The Town's share of local aid 
will not increase by 1.1 million dollars for fiscal year 1991 
or every year thereafter. The 1.1 million dollars if it does 
come about, will constitute certifying the free cash for the 
Town at the close of the year 1990. By spending that money 
on operating budgets we are essentially teetering along the 
pattern that may have been faulted in the past of spen- 
ding every dime we have. It has been his position publicly 
that the money be spent in a way that will reduce our costs 
in the future. That can be done in one or two ways. One, 
put the entire amount towards the capital budget there- 
fore borrowing less, which would have an effect on our debt 
service for the next four years. Two, the other possibility 
would not be utilizing the sewer betterment fees, which he 
had proposed in the budget and keeping those fees in a 
separate account to be used towards paving sewer construc- 
tion costs in the future, thereby decreasing the debt ser- 
vice in that area. The remaining monies will fund the 
capital improvement budget that is proposed in article 8, 
thereby decreasing the debt service costs in the future. He 
feels that it is important that the Town get its fiscal house 
in order. We just don't have the money at the current time 
to keep funding all the programs and services we have in 
the past. There has to be another way around that and 
if we could he feels that the money should be used from 
this windfall to set ourselves on the right road to the future. 



19 



Selectman Emerson supported the Town Manager, but he 
feels that the choice is up to the town meeting representa- 
tives. If the money does arrive, then the town meeting body 
may decide to spend it in some other way, it is their 
privilege. If they want to spend it on the trash, they have 
that choice and that's why he supported the motion to delay 
articles 13 & 14. Selectman Ready felt that this issue was 
going to be an involved lengthy debate and discussion. It 
may change the current plans or it may not. By discussing 
the articles tonight then they will get the opportuity to 
discuss the trash issue, and to get a sense on where the Town 
Meeting Body wants to go. It is the Town Meeting's deci- 
sion and if it is going to be a lengthy debate, we might as 
well start it now. John Emerson, of the Board of Health, 
spoke in favor of delaying articles 13 & 14. Currently the 
Board is creating rules and regulations concerning the trash 
issue. It would enable them the opportunity to be better 
prepared to answer any questions on the enforcement issue. 
Thomas Moran spoke in favor of delaying the two articles. 
A discussion took place. The question was raised whether 
we could be able to complete all the articles on June 18th. 
The Town Manager explained that if need be the town 
meeting body will meet as much as necessary to complete 
all the articles so that a budget is ready for July 1st. The 
town meeting body does have the final say. He explained 
that the Town Meeting body could eliminate the 1.8 million 
dollars in the budget and put it back to 0, which would 
take the Town out of the trash business entirely. Or by not 
accepting the Offset Receipts of 1,542,600. that would 
eliminate the receipt coming in with the fee collection and 
would throw the budget out of balance by 1.5 million 
dollars. That is the power that town meeting has, the op- 
portunity to make the decision as to how trash is going to 
be paid for. More discussion took place. Mark Gauthier 
spoke against postponing article 13 & 14. Scott McCaig 
moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on stopping debate, motion carried, 
unanimously. He then asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion of including articles 13 & 14 to the motion of post- 
poned articles 6, 7 & 8. This voice vote left the Chair in 
doubt, he then asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
Robert Joyce questioned the vote. The Moderator asked for 
the following tellers to come forward and conducted a hand 
count: 

Helen Manahan, Marc Vandenbulcke, Robert Scharn, 
and Michael McCall. The result was Yes 46 No 101, mo- 
tion defeated. 

He then went on and asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to postpone action under articles 6, 7 & 8 until Mon- 
day June 18th. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000.00 for the purpose of funding the sand lease ap- 
proved by the Town under Article 12 of the 1989 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is the 
second year of a ten year contract. The Finance Commit- 
tee supported the article. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Bonita Towle mov- 
ed that the Town vote to accept the provisions of the Genral 
Laws of Massachusetts Chapter 44, Section 53E, an act 
authorizing cities and towns to appropriate certain an- 
ticipated receipts. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
allows the use of various receipts from certain budgets. The 
three budgets involved are the Trash, Recreation and Sewer. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Frank Peterson moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $18,000.00 from the sale 
of graves and lots to the Improvement and Development 
Fund of the Cemetery Department. 

Frank Peterson, Superintendent of the Cemetery Depart- 
ment explained that this is a housekeeping article. It is done 
annually, money is taken from the sale of the lots and graves 
and used to improve the cemeteries. The Finance Com- 
mittee was in favor of the article. The Board of Selectmen 
supported the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
tht the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws, Article 
VII, Miscellaneous, Section 1, Regulation of Dogs, by 
deleting Paragraph 5, License Fees, and substituting in its 
place the following: 

The fee for every dog licensed shall be a: 

Ten Dollars ($10.00) for every neutered male dog. 
Ten Dollars ($10.00) for every spayed female dog. 
Ten Dollars ($10.00) for every male and female dog. 

Determination of licensing eligibility, dogs not required 
to be licensed, or refunding license fees shall be determin- 
ed as set out in section 139. 

The fee for every kennel license shall be as follows: 

Twenty Dollars ($20.00) for every kennel license for 

4 dogs or less. 
Forty Dollars ($40.00) for every kennel license for 

over 4 but not over 10 dogs. 
Seventy-five dollars ($75.00) for every kennel license 

for over 10 dogs but not over 25 dogs. 

All fees shall be increased by Five Dollars ($5.00) on the 
first day of the second month following the required licen- 
sing period, as outlined in Section 3 (a) of this By-Law, 
and by an additional Five Dollars ($5.00) on the first day 
of each succeeding month. 

In addition to all other sums due and owing for any 
license fee hereunder, a person who applies for license 
hereunder shall be obligated to pay all prior amounts of 
license fees determined to be due and owing by the Town 
Clerk pursuant to this By-Law, for past periods in which 
said person was obligated to obtain license. It shall be a 



20 



violation of this By-Law to fail to pay any said sum due 
hereunder this remedy shall be cumulative. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the pre- 
sent fee is $5.00 per year for a dog license. This would in- 
crease the fee to $10.00 per year for a dog license. The in- 
crease would pay the salary for the full time Dog Officer. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. This 
was part of the Fiscal Policy Advisory Committee recom- 
mendation to increase fees. John Conrad expressed con- 
cerns about the amount of dogs roaming his neighborhood. 
Robert Joyce questioned the fee amounts. Why were the 
spayed and neutered fee's the same as the unspayed and 
unneutered. Bernard Lynch explained that this is how the 
by-law was established and amended in 1987. Sandra 
Rilburn questioned why the homeowners fee was being in- 
creased and not the kennel licenses. Bernard Lynch said 
that most of the dogs are owned by private homeowners, 
however, if the Town Meeting Body wanted to increase the 
kennel fees he would be in favor of this. The Moderator 
asked if there was any further discussion, hearing none he 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 40, 
Section 58 of the Massachusetts General Laws authorizing 
the Town of Chelmsford to impose a municipal charges lien 
on real property for failure to pay solid waste fees by an 
established due date. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that in 1987 
the General Court passed an act which would allow the 
cities and town to be able to impose a municipal charge 
lien for any unpaid fees. A lien would be placed on the 
property to insure payment of various fees. This would be 
used as a mechanism to enable the town to put strength 
into its collection process. The town would have to specify 
and vote which fee this would be used for, that is why this 
article says the solid waste fee. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Committee is not taking a 
position one way or the other on how the trash issue should 
be collected. Robert Joyce moved to indefinitely postpone 
consideration of the article. The Moderator questioned the 
wording of the motion. Due to the fact that the word in- 
definite is being used, he felt that maybe instead of post- 
poning the article he would want to table it. If it is tabled 
without a specific time, it would be indefinite. If the word 
postpone is used then he must specify another time when 
it is to be brought back up for discussion. Robert Joyce 
agreed to table the article, he wanted to discuss the mo- 
tion, the Moderator then explained that tabling an article 
cannot be discussed, no debate can take place. Town 
Counsel's opinion was asked, James Harrington concurred 
with what the Moderator said. Robert Joyce withdrew his 
motion. Discussion took place concerning the method of 
attaching the lien. A number of representatives spoke 
against the article because it specified a fee to be charged 
for collecting the solid waste. Richard DeFreitas said that 
a fee is different from a tax. A fee is a charge for services 
rendered, there is a choice. If not paid, service will not 
take place. With a tax there is no choice, it must be paid. 
It is a payment for services which are expected to take place. 
Therefore liens should only be placed against property for 



non-payment of taxes, not for non-payment of fees. Michael 
Anthony of the Solid Waste Advisory Committee spoke 
about the article and the proposed tag and bag system. 
This article is not necessary in order to implement the new 
system. It will only allow the Town to attach those 
households who use the proposed system and do not pay 
the users fee. Richard Codling spoke against the article. 
He said mistakes do happen. Unknown to him a sewer lien 
was attached to his property, even though he paid 
everything up front, it was his responsibility to go to the 
Registry of Deeds and pay for the lien to be removed from 
his title. James Doukszewicz, Town Treasurer explained that 
this will not be filed at the Registry of Deeds against a 
homeowner's property. It will be filed in his office like non- 
payment of water bills are. When property is sold, a re- 
quest must be made to his office for a municipal tax lien. 
That is when the lien will show up, not at the Registry of 
Deeds. Robert Sexton moved to amend the article by 
deleting the s in charges and deleting the words lien on 
real property. The Moderator asked for the Town Counsel's 
opinion on the motion to amend. Town Counsel ruled the 
motion illegal. Robert Sexton explained that he was ad- 
vised to bring forth that particular wording in the next ar- 
ticle, he urged the body to vote this article down. Richard 
DeFreitas moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote which left the Chair in 
doubt. The tellers came forward and conducted a hand 
count. Yes 110 No. 30, %'s was 94, motion carried. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article, which left 
the Chair in doubt, he asked for a show of hands, motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
explained that this by-law will be the mechanism used to 
assure that those households using the Town's solid waste 
contract and system will pay the annual user's fee. If an 
individual homeoner has proof of using another comany, 
then a fee will not be assessed. The Finance Committee 
supported the article. Michael Anthony of the Solid Waste 
Advisory Committee spoke about the article. A dicussion 
took place, Mark Gauthier who is also a member of the 
Board of Health expressed his concerns with the article. 
He also said that because article 13 has been defeated, the 
Town has no way to charge people who use the system il- 
legally. If bags of trash are left around the Town, then it 
will be the Town's responsibility to pay the cost of picking 
them up and disposing of them. The only way the fine 
could be enforced that is mentioned in this article is to have 
an employee of the Board of Health, or the DPW, open 
the bag and search through it looking for information on 
where the trash came from. He felt that article 13 should 
be brought back for reconsideration, then the Town would 
have more control over any and all abuse of the system. 
He questioned if he could have the article reconsidered at 
this time, he didn't want to stop any debate on the present 
article. The Moderator assured him that any debate would 
be temporarily suspended until a vote is taken. Mark 
Gauthier moved to reconsider article 13. The Finance Com- 
mittee supported the motion. The Board of Selectmen did 
not want the article reconsidered. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to reconsider article 13, mo- 
tion defeated. A lengthy dicussion took place. Robert Joyce 
questioned what type of proper documentation would be 



21 



acceptable? Bernard Lynch explained that a paid receipt 
or a contract showing that the trash is being properly cared 
for. Robert Joyce asked if a resident like himself who was 
already paying for a dumpster at a location in town would 
that contract qualify as proof? It would be allowable in 
his case, Bernard Lynch said. Robert Joyce then question- 
ed people leaving trash bags around his dumpster, why 
should he pay for the removing of these bags. John Emer- 
son from the Board of Health explained that presently there 
are laws on the books that are enforceable provided that 
the person can be caught. However, these laws must be 
tightened up. William Spence spoke against the proposed 
tag bag system. Scott McCaig questioned the Town 
Manager if the tag bag system could really work, then what 
is the need for this by-law, why not wait and see if it is need- 
ed. Bernard Lynch said he felt that this system could work, 
but a back up provision is needed to assure the enforce- 
ment, he felt that it would avoid any problems in the future 
by having this by-law already in place. Selectman Ready 
spoke about the trash issue. He felt that because the over- 
ride question failed people wanted to encourage recycling 
and pay for what they use and that the Town should try 
this system. More discussion took place. Richard DeFreitas 
moved to amend the article. He felt that people were 
against the wording: "$100.00 for each offense, Each day 
thereafter." He moved to amend it to say, Violation of this 
by-laws it pertains to illegal use of the Town provided trash 
collection services shall be 5100.00 for each offense and 
each subsequent offense. He then explained the motion. 
The Moderator questioned why the last sentence wasn't just 
dropped, it would accomplish the same as the motion. 
Town Counsel James Harrington said that the wording of 
the amendment is questionable. Bernard Lynch explain- 
ed that its not a hundred dollar fine for every day that a 
person does not come down and show proper documenta- 
tion. It's a fine for each offense of using the town's service 
but not paying the fee. If someone doesn't register and 
doesn't put a bag out there is no fine. Town Counsel stated 
that from listening to the discussion if the last sentence is 
dropped from the original motion it would accomplish the 
purpose of the amendment. Richard DeFreitas then mov- 
ed to withdraw his original motion and submitted a new 
motion to remove the last sentence in paragrph b. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen supported 
the new motion. The Moderator read the article in it's en- 
tirety and left off the last sentence. He then asked for a 
voice vote on the motion to amend, motion carried. 
Thomas Mills of the Solid Waste Advisory Committee spoke 
and clarified some information about the solid waste con- 
tract. More discussion took place concerning the user's fee 
and the proposed bag and tag systen. The Town Manager 
explained that when the budget article comes up for discus- 
sion, the Town Meeting members will be making the final 
decision on whether to accept the budget as presented or 
decide what services will be cut to fund the trash budget. 
Richard DeFreitas moved to table this article. Barbara 
Ward moved to adjourn the meeting until Monday, June 
11, 1990. The Moderator asked Town Counsel which mo- 
tion took preference first for voting purposes. The 
Moderator was told to act on the motion to table the arti- 
cle first, then take a vote on the motion to adjourn. The 
Moderator explained that if the motion to table article 14 
is defeated then that will be the first article to be acted 
on when the meeting reconvenes. He asked for a voice vote 



on the motion to table article 14, which left the chair in 
doubt, he asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. The 
Moderator then asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
adjourn to Monday, June 11th to the McCarthy Middle 
School Auditorium. William Dalton wanted to make a 
statement. The Moderator told him that he would have 
to wait until after the vote on the motion to adjourn. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to adjourn, 
motion carried, unanimously. William Dalton then an- 
nounced that the Governor had signed the bill concern- 
ing Captain James Boermeester's homerule petition relative 
to the reduction in rank, which was voted at the April 23rd 
Special Town Meeting. He thanked the Town Meeting body 
for their support. The meeting adjourned at 11:20 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
JUNE 11, 1990 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. There were 141 Represe- 
tative Town Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator went over the rules and regulations of 
the Town Meeting procedure. 

The Moderator then announced to the town meeting 
body that Anna Meiander, who was a member of this year's 
Chelmsford High School graduating class of 1990, as an 
AFS Student from Finland, perished today in an automo- 
bile accident. She was an outstanding woman of whom the 
Finish country could be proud of. He asked for a moment 
of silence pray on behalf of Anna Meinader. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Con't from ATM 6-4-90 

Selectmen Dennis Ready explained the different cir- 
cumstances if this article does or doesn't pass. The 
Moderator then read the entire article as it was amended, 
which was the deletion of the last sentence "Each day that 
such violation continues shall constitute a separate offense." 
Kathleen Hillman then moved to amend the article to read: 

Section 5. Municipal Waste Collection 
A. All residents, with the exception of those having 
private collection such as the condominiums, trailer parks 
structure or complexes with five or more dwelling units shall 
use the Town provided solid waste collection services which 
shall be the system we presently have for a total sum of 
$188.00 per year— payable quarterly $47.00. This set fee 
will remain the same until the present contract with BFI 
runs out at the end of FY1992. At that time the trash ser- 
vices may be reviewed and renegotiated, so as to receive 
the best service and cost for the residents of Chelmsford. 
Residents have the option of private collection, providing 
the town is provided with proper documentation. 



22 



B. Violation of this by-law shall be punishable by a fine 
of $10.00 per month for each month that the fee is not paid. 

The Moderator asked for Town Counsel's opinion. Town 
Counsel , James Harrington, recommended that this by-law 
not be voted tonight. He cautioned that the wording didn't 
seem correct and that not enough proper time went into 
it in order to make it enforceable. The Finance Commit- 
tee does not support the motion based on Town Counsel's 
recommendation and the fact that they didn't want to be 
locked into a specific amount. William Goodhue spoke 
against the amendment and the article. He wanted to allow 
the private haulers into town and then just charge them 
a tonage fee, regardless if it's commercial or residential. 
That fee could be used to pay for the municipal and school 
trash and the recycling program. It would be easier to keep 
track of five or six hauler's rather than a thousand 
households. Then everyone would be paying for the trash 
problem. He felt that a more reasonable method should 
be adopted. William Logan asked Kathleen Hillman where 
did she get the dollar amount from. She said it was from 
the prior week's discussion and the information put out on 
the override. Joel Karp who became involved with the bag 
and tag trash issue, spoke about the article. He said that 
he wanted to see his trash picked up. He wants it disposed 
of in the most proper and economical way. A system has 
been devised that will do this. The problem with this pro- 
posed amendment is that you can't specify what the cost 
is going to be because its not mandatory participation, it's 
still a user's fee with options. It doesn't cover the cost. With 
the tag and bag system the cost for having BFI stop at each 
household is mandatory, after that each household will pay 
only for the amount of trash they put out. Michael An- 
thony spoke against the motion to amend. Richard 
DeFreitas expressed a need for a simpler system. Thomas 
Mills who is on the Solid Waste Advisory Committee, 
wanted to discuss the fix fee issue mentioned in the amend- 
ment. He went over information he had prepared. He felt 
that there is more bureaucracy involved in the bag and tag 
system than the quarterly billing system. There are four 
major costs which make up the bag and tag trash issue. 
Trash collection, bulk collection and administration. He 
listed the estimated cost for each with comparison figures. 
Jeffrey Stallard moved the question. Motion carried 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to amend. Motion defeated. Scott McCraig mov- 
ed to postpone this article until the completion of article 
8. The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
were not in favor of the motion to postpone. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to postpone. This left 
the Chair in doubt, he asked for a show of hands, which 
still left the Chair in doubt, the following tellers came for- 
ward and a hand count was taken: 

Helen Manahan, Marc Vandenbulcke, Robert Scharn, 
and Michael McCall. The result was Yes 45 No 88, mo- 
tion defeated to postpone the article Jeffrey Stallard moved 
the question. Motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the article, which left the Chair 
in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, still in doubt the 
tellers came forward and conducted a hand count. The 
result was Yes 81 No. 50, motion carried. The article reads 
as follows: 



Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Article VIII, Waste Disposal of the General By- 
Laws by adding Section 5 as follows: 

Section 5. Municipal Waste Collection 

(a.) All residents, excepting those in structures or com- 
plexes with five or more dwelling units, shall use the Town 
provided solid waste collection services unless the Town is 
provided with proper documentation that solid waste is be- 
ing disposed of in accordance with all applicable 
municipal, state and federal laws. It shall be unlawful for 
any resident to use town provided solid waste collection ser- 
vices without paying the applicable fee for such services. 

(b). Violation of this By-law shall be punishable by a 
fine of One Hundred Dollars (5100.00) for each offense. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to accept the following mentioned street, 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their 
reports duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

1. Shedd Lane (partial 

2. Moore Street (partial 

3. Sears Lane 

4. Thomas William Lane 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with 
the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject 
to the withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met and to see if the Town will vote 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and 
all temporary and/or permanent easements, and any pro- 
perty in fee simple, with trees thereon, by purchase, emi- 
nent domain, or otherwise, for the purpose of securing traf- 
fic safety and road improvements, and move that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of S4.00 to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with 
the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages 
which may be awarded as a result of any such taking; and 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute 
all necessary and proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that these 
streets had met the layout requirements of the Planning 
Board and Town Engineer and once released the residents 
on the streets mentioned would be eligible for town ser- 
vices. The Finance Committee supported the article, James 
Sousa asked what did the word partial indicate after two 
of the streets. The Town Manager explained that the con- 
tractor is required to file a bond and must show the Plan- 
ning Board "as built plans" when these developments are 
brought before them. The streets with the word partial after 
them, have been developed as shown on the plans where 
all the homes have been built. The Town is only releasing 
part of the bonds for each street. The rest will be released 
upon the completion of the streets. Kay Roberts spoke in 
favor of the article and asked for the town meeting sup- 
port. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 



23 



UNDER ARTICLE 16 Chairman of the Sewer Com- 
mission, Barry Balan explained the article. The residents 
in the area asked for an evaluation to be done in order to 
see if the Sewer Commission will extend the service. In order 
for this is to be done certain criterias are established and 
must be met. Such as, area support for a petition, intensi- 
ty of existing septic system problems, ability to repair or 
reconstruct septic systems, likelihood of grant funding costs, 
and also the possibility of constituting a health problem. 
The number of homes represented in each area were 
counted as were the number of homeowners signing the 
petition. Areas where greater than 50% of the homes were 
represented on the petition received further consideration. 
Those petitions with greater that 80% support were also 
acknowledged. The Board of Health records were used to 
determine the intensity of actual septic system failure and 
repairs in the petitioned areas. Inability to rebuild or repair 
is a major criteria used by the funding agencies to deter- 
mine eligibility for grant funding. The ability to repair or 
reconstruct is based upon lot size, soils, slope and ground- 
water conditions. All petitions to date were reviewed bas- 
ed upon the assumption that lateral sewer (50%) funding 
would be available. Presently, the state intends to replace 
50% grants with low interest loans. The construction costs 
are included in the overall billing program. Twelve peti- 
tion areas were received in 1989, only four have met the 
established criterias and are being recommended. This is 
the first time that appropriation for an area is being ask- 
ed outside of the twenty year plan which had been outlin- 
ed in 1984. As with previous appropriations a ballot ques- 
tion is required to exempt this appropriation from the 
limitations of proposition 2V£. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. This is an ongoing two part pro- 
gram. The Board of Selectmen supported the article. Jef- 
frey Stallard questioned the financial status of the depart- 
ment. What has been appropriated and spent? Approx- 
imate to date sewer construction overall costs is about 24 
million dollars of which a little over 13 million has been 
grant funded. A discussion took place. Ann Graham ques- 
tioned the wording of the article. She felt it should include 
contingent upon the Town voting to certify from the limits 
of proposition 2V£- Town Counsel James Harrington ex- 
plained that the motion does not require this additional 
wording, but according to state statute, this wording must 
be on the ballot question. Ann Graham questioned the 
management of the funds and the betterments fees. The 
betterment fees shouldn't be applied to the general fund, 
according to the Weston and Sampson report. The sewer 
funding was to be 80% from taxes and 20% from the bet- 
terment fees When she was researching her information 
on the sewer projects in order to get answers, she was told 
by the Sewer Commission to submit her questions in 
writing. John Emerson of the Sewer Commission explain- 
ed that the Sewer Commissioners and personnel have ex- 
tended every courtesy for the requested information. He 
listed the areas and the cost's involved. Barry Balan also 
explained that all the Sewer Commission records are open 
to the public. Any citizen is more than welcome to view 
them in the office, if questions or assistance is needed the 
office personnel handles it. This policy has been extended 
within reason, to everyone and numerous times to Mrs. 
Graham. Weston and Sampson Engineering, the consulting 
firm handling the sewer project has also answered Mrs. 



Graham's inquiries. However, today upon returning Mrs. 
Graham's phone call this afternoon, she wanted to come 
right down to the office and have some questions answered. 
At that point, she was told to submit any and all questions 
in writing to the Sewer Commissioners. Mr. Balan explained 
that he is not a Sewer Commissioner by profession, he does 
have another job which enables him if need be to drop by 
the sewer office. In the past, arrangements had been made 
when all parties were able to meet and go over certain 
things. Mrs. Graham said she would be glad to go over the 
records herself. When she went to a meeting all she wanted 
to know was what has been spent to date, she felt she should 
have been told a dollar amount, she was told nothing. 
Kathy Rigsby is one of the residents on the petition, she 
has put in two septic systems in the last five years. Her lot 
will not hold any more systems. She is surrounded by 
wetlands. Judith Haas asked for support because of the en- 
vironmental factor, she too has had problems in the past 
with her leaching field. Bernard Ready one of the peti- 
tioner's also asked for support. His neighborhood was in 
desperate need. Dennis Ready stated that there is a definite 
need in these petitioned areas. The criteria was there when 
he was on the commission. Roger Blomgren moved to 
amend the article by adding to the end the wording "any 
appropriation under this article shall be allowed only upon 
a specific exemption under prop 2 ]4 ." Roger Blomgren ex- 
plained this would avoid any confusion on how the article 
would be funded, the particular wording clarifies that ques- 
tion. The Finance Committee supported the article. The 
Board of Selectmen supported the motion to amend. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried Discus- 
sion took place. Questions were asked on why these areas 
weren't included in the original plan. It was explained tht 
when the original surveys were sent out people didn't res- 
pond. Selectman Emerson moved the question, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the article as amended. Motion carried unanimously. 
The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, Barry Balan, 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
S3, 100, 000. 00 for the purpose of designing and construc- 
ting sewers, pump stations and force mains to serve Cathy 
Road, Jonathan Lane, Mcintosh Road, Clover Hill Drive, 
Burning Tree Lane, Country Club Drive, DeWolf Drive, 
Green Valley Drive, Drew Circle and Parker Road from Hall 
Street to Green Valley Drive; to pay for related legal, ad- 
ministrative and other pertinent expenses; to authorize the 
Sewer Commission with the consent of the Board of Select- 
men to acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise 
all easements and rights concerning land necessary in con- 
junction with the project; that to meet this appropriation 
the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen be authorized to borrow S3, 100, 000. 00 under 
M.G.L. Chapter 44 as amended and supplemented, and 
to issue and sell general obligations bonds or notes of the 
Town therefore; that the Sewer Commission be authorized 
to apply for, accept and expend any state and federal grants 
and/or loans, and private monies that are made available 
for the project; that betterments shall be assessed based 
on the sewer construction in accordance with the applicable 
provisions of the General Laws of the Commonwealth and 
the Town of Chelmsford Betterment Assessment and Pro- 



24 



vilege Fees Rules and Regulations. Any appropriation 
under this article shall be allowed only upon a specific ex- 
emption under proposition 2 l /& ■ 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Chairman of the Sewer Com- 
mission, Barry Balan moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer Com- 
missioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or per- 
manent easements, and any property in fee simply with 
the buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent do- 
main, or otherwise, for the property located in the Town 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and 
show on a set of plans entitled plan of Sewer Easements 
in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Phase IIB Sewers, prepared 
for the Chelmsford Sewer Commission February, 1990 by 
Richard F. Kaminski and Associates, Inc., a copy of which 
is on file in the office of the Town Engineer and are incor- 
porated herewith; for the purpose of constructing and 
maintaining sewers, pumping stations, and all other ap- 
purtenances thereto. 

Sewer Commissioner Barry Balan, explained that ap- 
proval of this article is needed in order to assure that the 
Town receives nearly S4, 000, 000 in grant funding during 
June of 1990. With the funding programs shifting from 
grants to loans after July 1, 1990, it would be unadvisable 
to delay approval of this article and thus lose S4, 000, 000 
of state funding. The Finance Committee supported the 
article. The Board of Selectmen supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Chairman of the Planning 
Board, Thomas E. Firth, Jr. moved that the Town vote to 
delete Section 1424 (g) of the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law 
and substitute in its place the following: All site plans sub- 
mitted to the Planning Board for review must be accom- 
panied by a check for the fee to cover expenses incurred 
by the Town during the site plan review process. The fee 
shall be based on the size of the proposed building(s) and 
shall be S50.00 per 1,000 square feet (or portion thereof) 
of gross floor area with a maximum fee not to exceed 
SI, 000. 00. The Planning Board may also retain the ser- 
vices of an independent consultant as it deems necessary 
for assistance in evaluating a specific problem of concern. 
In this case, the fee charged by the consultant shall be paid 
by the applicant through the Planning Board. 

Chairman of the Planning Board, Thomas E. Firth Jr. 
explained the purpose of the article. The present fee 
schedule is S200.00 per special permit. Site plan for a ma- 
jor business complex is S400.00 for a 10,000 square feet 
building. This changes it to be S50.00 per 1,000 square 
feet (or portion thereof), of gross floor with a maximum 
fee not to exceed SI, 000. 00. The Planning Board may also 
retain the services of an independent consultant as it deems 
necessary for assistance in evaluating a specific problem 
or concern. In this case the fee charged by the consultant 
shall be paid by the applicant through the Planning Board. 
He then read the Board's recommendation: The Planning 
Board held a public hearing on April 11, 1990 and voted 
in favor (7-0) of the proposal to change the zoning by 
deleting in its entirety Section 1424 (g) and replace it with 
the new section 1424 (g). The Finance Committee and the 



Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 The Moderator read the arti- 
cle. Kathleen Hillman, the petitioner explained the pur- 
pose of the article. In 1988 when the original by-law was 
passed at the Special Town Meeting in September, the wor- 
ding of "including the soft catch trapping system" was in- 
advertently left out. Chelmsford was the first town to pass 
such a by-law, since then fourteen to sixteen other towns 
have passed the by-law with the complete wording. The 
Moderator asked for the various recommendation. Dwight 
Hayward Chairman of the Finance Committee, stated that 
because there was no financial impact involved they were 
not going to comment one way or the other. The Board 
of Selectmen were split, two were for the article and two 
were against, one was absent when the vote was taken. A 
discussion took place. Jeffrey Stallard moved to amend the 
article by deleting the wording "including the soft catch 
trapping system" and insert the word "unlicensed" before 
the word "person" in section 1 of the article. More discus- 
sion took place. The Finance Committee would not recom- 
mend one way or the other. The Board of Selectmen 
wanted to hear further dicussion. George Abely wanted to 
amend the amendment by adding "provided said person 
has written permission of the selectmen or landowner." A 
lengthy discussion took place. Renee LaRouche spoke 
against the article and in favor of the amendments. Den- 
nis Ready moved the question. Motion carried, by voice 
vote. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on George Abe- 
ly's motion, which left the chair in doubt. The tellers came 
forward and conducted a hand count. Yes 65 No 53. mo- 
tion carried. The Moderator started to take a voice vote 
on Jeffrey Stallard's motion, when Norman LeBrecque ask- 
ed a point of order. He was concerned that the wording 
possibly contradicted itself and asked for clarification. The 
wording of "it should be prohibited and unlawful, provid- 
ed that they get permission" he felt that the word "unless" 
should be included. George Abely was called forward and 
a discussion took place between himself, Jeffrey Stallard 
and Town Counsel. Which resulted in a new motion to 
amend the amendment: Delete George Abely's wording 
that was just passed and add a sentence to read: "Any per- 
son wishing to trap shall have the written permission of 
either the landowner or selectman." More discussion took 
place. Mary Frantz asked if this meant that the Selectmen 
could give permission for someone to trap on the home- 
owner's land. George Abely explained that all he wanted 
was for the Selectmen to be able to take care of the public 
land and the homeowner to take care of their land. The 
Moderator questioned the wording and asked for Town 
Counsel to again clarify it. The new wording of the mo- 
tion is: "Without the permission of the landowner, or of 
the Selectmen in the case of public land." This would be 
the last sentence on the motion. Dennis Ready moved the 
question. Motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
then asked for a voice vote on the Abely motion. Motion 
carried. He then asked if there was any discussion on the 
Stallard motion. David McLachlan, member of the Con- 
servation Committee urged for the defeat on this motion 
to amend. Harry Foster spoke in favor of the motion to 
amend. Jeffrey Stallard moved the question. Motion car- 
ried, unanimouslv. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 



25 



which left the chair in doubt, he then asked for a show 
of hands, motion defeated. The decision was questioned, 
the tellers were asked to come forward and conduct a hand 
count. Result of the hand count: Yes 32 No 82, motion 
defeated. Richard DeFreitas moved to amend the article 
by deleting the wording "including the soft catch trapping 
system," and adding the wording "without the permission 
of the landowner or the selectmen in the case of public 
land." He explained that it was different from the Stallard 
motion because the word "unlicensed" before the word per- 
son is not included in this amendment. A discussion took 
place, Dennis Ready moved the question. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion, which left the chair in doubt, he asked for a show 
of hands motiond defeated. Dennis Ready moved the ques- 
tion which would stop any further debate on this article. 
Motion carried. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
which left the chair in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. The article reads as follows: 



not built into school employees salary schedules; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is an 
annual housekeeping article. It is required in order to ob- 
tain the EEOG grants provided by the state. The Finance 
Committee supported the article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved to adjourn the meeting 
until Monday evening June 18th to the McCarthy Middle 
School Auditorium. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
meeting adjourned at 10:45 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



Kathleen Hillman moved that the Town vote to amend 
the General By-Law Article VI, Police Regulations, Sec- 
tion 22, Prohibition of Trapping by Means of the Leghold 
and Conibear Trap, by deleting Paragraph 1, and substitute 
in its place the following: 

It shall be prohibited and unlawful for any person to 
set, trigger, activate, or otherwise use or cause to be set, 
triggered, activated or use any type of modification of any 
steel jawed, leghold trap, including the soft catch trapp- 
ing system, or any form of jaw trap or conibear trap for 
the capture of any animal. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to amend the General By-Law Article 
II, Town Meeting, by deleting Section 1, Time of Annual 
Town Meeting and substituting in its place the following: 

The Annual Election shall be held on the First Tuesday 
of April and the Annual Town Meeting shall be held on 
the last Monday in April and the first Monday in October. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
change is taking place in order to meet the requirements 
according to the charter. The Finance Committee sup- 
ported the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Stratos Dukakis of the Nashoba 
Valley Technical High School District Committee, moved 
that the Town vote to accept provisions of Section 12 of 
Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985, the SCHOOL IMPROVE- 
MENT ACT, in relation to the Equal Education Oppor- 
tunity Grant in the amount of Seventeen Thousand Nine 
Hundred Twenty Dollars ($17,920.00) for the Nashoba 
Valley Technical High School, conditioned upon the fun- 
ding of said programs by any source other than the Town 
of Chelmsford, and further conditioned upon, to the ex- 
tent permitted by law, that said professional grant pro- 
grams, and any monies paid to any employee of the 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School, shall not be used 
or considered a past practice for the purpose of collective 
bargaining and shall be nonrecurring lump sum payment 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
JUNE 18, 1990 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. There were 150 Represen- 
tative Town Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator went over the procedure that will be us- 
ed on voting the budget items. According to the Finance 
Committee warrant book, there are a total of thirty-one 
line items. Within these line items, there are nine 
categories. Any discussion will be directed to the numbered 
line items, which is the total budget figure of the category 
shown. The individual departmental figures shown are for 
informational use only. He gave an example by explain- 
ing, the non-numbered salary figures shown under the 
General Government Category, make up the total budget 
figure shown for line 1. Salary. Therefore, when the vote 
is taken it will be based on the numbered line items only. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 the Moderator read the article 
without giving any figure at this time. He then asked the 
Town Manager for any introductory remarks. 

The Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that this 
is the first time that the budget is being presented in the 
departmental fashion as shown. He feels this will be the 
most useful way to present it each year. This is one of the 
major changes that has come about with the passage of 
the charter, that there will be a comprehensive consolidated 
executive budget. He took the time to go over some of the 
issues that are before the Town, himself, the department 
heads, Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee. 
He went over the budget presentation package for FY91 
that he had prepared. He mentioned the budget process, 
which is an ongoing process. It's not something that is put 
together in a couple of weeks and then put before the body 
for a vote. He listed the various steps taken to make up this 
budget. He mentioned the FY91 Budget goals, Revenue 
Comparisons. He listed the revenue changes that had taken 



26 



place since this budget was prepared: Cranberry Bog Reim- 
bursement, $431,250.00, Level Funded Local Aid, 
f451.317.00, Brookline Decision, $1,155,753.00 and Misc. 
Adjustments, $145,432.00. He felt that certain expenditures 
should now be changed, and he listed them. As a result 
of the amended figures shown within the report he pro- 
posed that the total FY91 budget be $45,378,801. After the 
transfers from the Cranberry Bog reimbursement of $431,- 
250.00 and the sale of real estate the net operating budget 
would be $44,848,551.00. At the end of the presentation, 
the Town Manager received a round of applause. The 
Moderator then read a motion to amend the budget by 
the Town Manager. Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the proposed budget as 
follows: 

1. Reduce General Government Expenses by 
$50,000 (sick Buyback) — Line Item 2. 

2. Increase Chelmsford School Department by 
$300,000 -Line Item 6 



$10,400. to read $4,921,631. He explained that this would 
add a half of clerk to the Town Clerk's Staff for six months. 
This position had originally been eliminated and will be 
retained for the next six months. The Finance Committee 
and the Board of Selectmen supported the motion to 
amend. The Moderator asked for further discussion, hear 
ing none he asked for a voice vote, motion carried 
unanimously. He then asked for any discussion on line item 
1-5 under General Government. Barry Balan moved to vote 
on the entire budget as present by the Town Manager. He 
felt that it's been pared down enough. The Finance Com- 
mittee was not in favor of voting on the entire budget 
because of the trash users fees involved and the need for 
discussion. They felt that perhaps the entire budget could 
be voted on in its entirety excluding the trash issue. The 
Moderator asked for Town Counsel's opinion. James Harr- 
ington, Town Counsel declared that this could be con- 
sidered. The Moderator read the revised motion: To vote 
on the Manager's budget with the exclusion of the trash 
monies. A discussion took place. Barry Balan withdrew his 
motion. 



3. Increae Public Safety Salaries by $77,317 — Line 
Item 8 as follows: 

Fire $60,000 Police $17,317 

4. Increaes Snow and Ice by $100,000 — Line Item 
16 

5. Increase Community Services (Human Services) 
Salaries by $3,500 (Health Department) Line 
Item 17 

6. Increase Community Services (Human Services) 
Expenses by $3,000 (Elder Affairs Meals on 
Wheels)— Line Item 18 

7. Increase Community Services (Culture and Re- 
creation) Salaries by $52,872 — Line Item 21 as 
follows 

Recreation $37,872 Library $15,000 

8. Increase Community Services (Cultural and 
Recreation) Expenses by $4,003 (Recreation) — 
Line Item 22 

9. Amend Community Services (Cultural and 
Recreation) by adding Recreation Offset 
Receipts of $39,375. 

10. Debt and Interest Delete Transfer Special 
Revenue — Sewer Betterments $700,000 Insert 
Transfer Special Revenue Cranberry Bog Reim- 
bursement $431,250. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended 
the Town Managers proposed budget and the motion to 
amend. The Board of Selectmen recommended the mo- 
tion. The Moderator asked for any discussion hearing none 
he asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 
Bernard Lynch then moved to amend under General 
Government Line Item 1 Salaries by increasing it $10,400, 
to read $771,004, and decreasing Line Item 2 Expenses by 



Questions were raised on why just the numbered line 
items were being allowed discussion and not all the line 
items. The Moderator explained that what has been done 
at previous Annual Town Meetings since proposition 214 
has been enacted, was all numbered line items were open- 
ed for discussion. A final vote was taken at the conclusion 
of all discussion concerning the entire budget. If a vote was 
taken at each numbered line item, then the meeting ad- 
journed to another night, according to Town By-laws, that 
business could not be brought back for discussion or 
amendments. By waiting to take the vote at the end of the 
last numbered line item, any adjustments could be made 
if need be. Unless instructed to do otherwise, he was going 
to proceed with this process of discussion at only the 
numbered line items. As explained at the beginning of the 
meeting, any item not numbered is for informational pur- 
poses only. A discussion followed. A number of represen- 
tatives spoke against discussion taking place only at the 
numbered line items, and not being able to vote on each 
line item. The Town Manager explained that by voting the 
total figures for each line item within the category allows 
him the flexibility to move money from one department 
to another. If he feels better management is needed. How- 
ever, it can only be done to those line items within the . 
departmental category. He couldn't take monies from 
Public Safety category, and put it into the Finance Depart- 
ment. He would have to take it within the General Govern- 
ment category. Robert Sexton said that he felt that the rep- 
resentatives wanted to make sure that the money is spent 
on each department's line item as shown, and not let it 
be moved around. Thomas Moran brought up the closing 
the Fire Station in West Chelmsford. He felt that this 
needed detail discussion before any action took place. The 
Town Manager explained that the representatives could on- 
ly vote on the money figures, not the policy on how it was 
going to be spent. That was left up to the Board of Select- 
men, Town Manager, or the actual department head if the 
situation need be. Cheryl Boss of the Finance Committee, 
explained that this is how the School Department handles 
its budget, they are voted a certain amont of money to work 
with, however, they spend it is up to them, Town Meeting 
has no say on where the money is to be actually spent. At 



27 



the Finance Commmittee meetings all departments and 
the Town Manager presented detail information explain- 
ing where the money allocated would be spent. Donald 
Ayer moved that the Town Meeting Representatives approve 
each Departments budget and its total. And that we not 
approve general totals for sections. Town Counsel, James 
Harrington, ruled this motion out of order. More discus- 
sion took place. Selectman Roger Blomgren proposed that 
the Town Meeting proceed through the budget item by 
item. Selectman Bradford Emerson agreed much time has 
been wasted and felt this would be a better approach, and 
so moved for this to be done. 

The Moderator then proceeded to read each informa- 
tional non-numbered line item, beginning with the Ex- 
ecutive Office the Town Manager/Selectmen through the 
Planning Board reading each line item, and ask if any need 
for discussion under each. Under the Employee Benefits 
heading, discussion took place. Richard Codling com- 
mented on the Chapter 32B Insurance costs. The Town 
Manager explained that he is working on trying to lower 
costs. However, it is a cost that he has no control of. The 
rates are set by the insurance companies. Ann Graham felt 
that we should be downsizing general government, not in- 
creasing it. Some employee's have been given 12% to 16% 
increases in salaries over the years. We were lead to believe 
last year they were only getting 2 V6 % when in reality they 
are given 5%. She hasn't seen this being done and used 
the Accounting Office as an example. She noted that since 
1980 there has been four employees in the Town Accoun- 
tant's Office. When in prior years there was only three 
employees. Mary Villare, Ass't Accountant corrected her 
and said that since 1972 there has always been three clerks 
and one Town Accountant. The Town Manager explained 
that the employees under the Personnel Board and the 
employees clerical union are required to have yearly evalua- 
tions. With this process they are given a step raise and a 
cost of living raise, which could amount to a total of 5% 
or more. He said he was working with the committees to 
try and curb these costs. Under Sick leave buy-back, D. 
Lorraine Lambert questioned the elimination of sick time 
buy back. An employee is more likely to take advantage 
of taking time off because at the end of the year they will 
no longer be able to accumulate it. It is a benefit that they 
should get paid for it because they did earn it by not tak- 
ing it off. James Sousa wanted to make a point that back 
in the 70s when inflation was high the sick leave buy-back 
was offered as a benefit in place of raises. This is not only 
paid at the time of retirement but in case of death, so in 
most cases any employee who has been with the Town a 
great amount of years do look at this as an additional 
benefit. 

Under the Chelmsford School Department category, 
Chairman of the School Committee Wendy Marcks, in- 
dicated that the Committee was not prepared to recom- 
mend any bottom line figure for their budget, because 
tonight was the first time that they were made aware that 
they would be given an additional S300,000. They could 
only give a recommendation on what they were prepared 
for and felt that this additional money would change those 
figures and recommendations. A question was raised by 
Andrew Silinish, if the bottom line figure is all that is re- 
quired to be voted on then what difference would it make? 



Why couldn't the School Committee give their recommen- 
dations tonight? Tom Carroll, the Financial Advisor of the 
School Commmittee explained that they required more 
time to go over the figures. Teaching positions would 
definitely be reinstated, but the Committee must look at 
where they will be added, where the most need is. This 
would result in schedules being updated during the sum- 
mer in order to be ready for the fall. Depending on what 
the Board does with any additional funds, any activity pro- 
grams, athletic programs, supplies and materials that have 
been cut would be looked at and analyzed. Donald Ayer 
moved to increase the Manager's budget figure by another 
S127.000 for a total of S22,506,338. He explained that the 
original cuts made to the budget was S900.000 which was 
approximately 60%. He felt that the Board should receive 
more monies because of the amount of monies cut. He 
listed a few areas where he would like the money spent. 
The Finance Committee asked the Town Manager where 
would the additional monies come from. The Town Man- 
ager explained that if need be he would take the money 
from the capital improvement article, which included 
school mandated items. He was against doing this, he felt 
it would be better spent if this debt was decreased. Less 
money would have to be borrowed. This would result with 
the next four years of payments being smaller, and a sav- 
ings would be made. He recommended against the motion. 
Chairman of School Committee Wendy Marcks further ex- 
plained that at their previous meeting the Committee voted 
as a body to support a balance budget of 60% of any an- 
ticipated monies coming into the town. Samuel Poulten 
stated that the School Department is certainly entitled to 
receive more money. He reminded the Town Meeting body 
of the cuts and the amount of money that was actually cut 
from the School's Budget, not only this year but last year, 
due to the loss of state aid. The Brookline decision money 
should all be put back into the budget, not 40% for the 
town and 60% for the school but fairly distributed. This 
is where it came from. He wanted to see the School Depart- 
ment come back next week with their actual recommen- 
dation, and he hoped the figure would be even more than 
Donald Ayer's motion. Dennis Ready moved to amend the 
Ayer motion by adding an additional S263.000 to the 
S127.000 figure. For a total of S390.000 added to the bot- 
to line which would give a total budget of S22,769,338. 
He felt that the School Department's fair share of the 60% 
would be S695.000. By including the amended monies 
already voted of S300.000 and adding S390.000 (which is 
the S127.000 and his S263.000 together) would bring the 
total amount of increased monies up to S695,000 which 
is 60% of the revenues received back. For a total bottom 
line figure of S22,769,338. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance Com- 
mittee wanted to hear from the School Committee first. 
Chairman Wendy Marcks stated again that they could not 
reach an intelligent figure at this time. She applauded what 
the Town Manager and the Representatives were attemp- 
ting to do, but in all fairness they needed time to look at 
their budget and come up with their own figures of recom- 
mendation. She also stated that she was more concerned 
at this time of trying to act on article 8 tonight, because 
of the mandated handicap items. The Committee was 
meeting the next night and needed to award these bids, 
this would save the town S250.000. 



28 



The Moderator suggested that maybe article 6 could be 
tabled at this time, and bring up article 8 for discussion 
and vote. Edward Hilliard asked if this was done, would 
everything in article 6 be able to be brought back up for 
discussion including the amendment(s) all ready on the 
floor? Andrew Silinish moved to adjourn until next Mon- 
day, June 25th. William Dalton questioned why wait until 
next Monday to come back, why not come back another 
night this week. Chairman of the School Committee Wen- 
dy Marcks was against adjourning at this time, she wanted 
to be able to vote on article 8. The Town Manager was not 
in favor of taking article 8 up before finishing the budget. 
Any remaining monies not applied to the budget will be 
used to fund article 8. The Finance Committee felt these 
issues should be addressed next Monday. The Board of 
Selectmen supported adjourning to next Monday. The 
School Committee stated that they would be in favor of 
adjourning to another night this week. Barry Balan mov- 
ed to adjourn to Wednesday night June 20th, at the McCar- 
thy Middle School Auditorium, at 7:30 p.m. The 
Moderator asked Town Counsel if this motion to amend 
would be in order if in fact another board has already 
scheduled a meeting. James Harrington, Town Counsel ex- 
plained that according to Town By-law the Town Meeting 
takes precedent over any other previous scheduled meeting. 
The Finance Committee supported the motion to amend 
the motion to adjourn. The Board of Selectmen said that 
the Board had a tie vote at this time. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote which left the chair in doubt, he then 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The meeting 
adjourned at 11:10 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
JUNE 20, 1990 

The Annual Town Meeting was ailed to order at 7:40 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. There were 137 Represen- 
tative Town Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator made a few announcements. The CHS 
Class of 1992 were selling refreshments in the lobby. The 
Ethics Committee has completed its rules and a draft is 
available at the check-in table. The Committee will pre- 
sent these recommendations at a public meeting schedul- 
ed for July 11, 1990 at 7:30 p.m. at the Town office 
Building. Any further input will be discussed at the public 
meeeting with the final report being presented to the Town 
Meeting in the fall. The By-law Committee is also looking 
for input from the representatives on possible changes they 
would like to have done in connection with the town 
meeting format. He gave the names and phone numbers 
of the various members of these two committees if further 
questions or answers were needed. The Board of Select- 
men have scheduled a Special Town Meeting at the request 
of the Board of Health, for Monday, July 23, 1990. He ask- 
ed the representatives to please make note of this date. 



The Moderator then explained that the Town Meeting 
had adjourned on Monday evening at the Chelmsford 
School Department Category which appeared in the budget 
discussion under Article 6. And he would continue the 
discussion from that point. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 CON'T The Town Meeting 
body was discussing the Dennis Ready motion, which was 
to amend Donald Ayer's motion by adding a total of 
S390.000 of new monies to the amended figure of 
S22,379,338. Which would result with a bottom line total 
figure of S22,769,338. Donald Ayer said that he had 
discussed this motion with Dennis Ready and that they both 
agreed to withdraw the motion at this time. Donald Ayer 
moved to withdraw the motion at this time. The Moderator 
stated that since it has been presented to the body and a 
discussion has already taken place, he asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to withdraw, motion carried. Donald Ayer 
then commented that he would personally like to commit 
himself to staying the night and completing the budget. 
He felt that other representatives felt the same way, so he 
requested that all discussion be brief. Chairman of the 
School Committee Wendy Marcks moved to amend the mo- 
tion by adding an additional S198.860 of new monies, to 
the amended monies already voted of S300.000 for a total 
increase of S498.860 added to the bottom line which would 
give a total budget of S22,578,198. Thomas Carroll, the 
Financial Advisor of the School Committee, gave a brief 
presentation explaining where the money would be going. 
Personnel, general support, health education programs, 
textbooks, library, audio vision equipment, special educa- 
tion, late bus service, maintenance of grounds. A discus- 
sion followed. The moderator asked for the Finance Com- 
mittee's recommendation. Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, Dwight Hayward, supported the motion to amend. 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Bonita Towle said 
that the majority of the Board of Selectmen present were 
in favor of the motion. The Town Manager said that al- 
though he agreed with the School Committee's request he 
was going to stand by his original budget figure that has 
already been amended. Samuel Poulten made a motion 
to move the question, which would stop any further debate. 
The Moderator attempted a voice vote which left the chair 
in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, still in doubt he 
asked the tellers to come forward and conduct a hand 
count. The following tellers came forward: Michael 
McCall, Helen Manahan, Marc Vandenbulcke, Marie 
Geary. The result Yes 80, No 46, %'s is 84 motion is 
defeated. The discussion continued. Robert Sexton said 
that the School Committee's budget if approved would be 
increased 6.6%. Thomas Carroll explained why the budget 
has increased. More discussion followed. Robert Sexton 
moved to table the School Committee's motion. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. The 
discussion continued. A number of representatives spoke 
for and against the School Committee's motion. Jeffrey 
Stallard moved the question to stop debate, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator than asked for a voice 
vote on the School Committee's motion to increase the bot- 
tom line to S22,578,198, motion carried. Under the 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School Samuel Poulten 
wanted to note the possibility of the need to increase this 
budget next year. Thomas Carey, member of the Nashoba 
Valley Technical High School Committee, commented that 



29 



the budget is down to the minimum and that the adminis- 
tration has done a tremendous job. The Moderator pro- 
ceeded by reading the Public Safety category numbered 
line items and the non-numbered items. Under the Police 
Department, Chief of Police Raymond McKeon spoke 
about his budget. Dennis Ready moved to amend the arti- 
cle by adding an additional $75,000 to the Police salary 
account. He said that this would be used to reinstate the 
Safety Patrol Unit. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Committee wanted to 
hear more input before recommending. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor. The Town Manager was against 
the motion. Dennis Ready explained that the funding for 
this unit had been cut from last year's budget. This unit 
was responsible for bringing in a large amount of revenue 
to the town due to offenders of traffic violations. By rein- 
stating this unit two patrolmen would not have to be laid 
off. They would work on this unit. No overtime or any ad- 
ditional equipment will be needed. The Finance Commit- 
tee was against the motion. A very lengthy discussion took 
place. William Logan, a member of the Traffic and Safe- 
ty Committee, who as a member of the Finance Commit- 
tee was the Police Department's liaison to the committee, 
felt that this was a last minute decision that should have 
been discussed more with his two boards. Bradford Emer- 
son moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote which left the chair in doubt. The tellers 
came forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 113, No 
9, %'s is 82, motion carried. He then asked for a vote on 
Dennis Ready's motion to increase the Police Salary account 
by $75,000. Motion carried. Total Police salary is now to 
read $2,563,235. The Moderator read the non-numbered 
items under the Fire Department. James Sousa moved to 
amend the Salary Line by increasing it $176,500 and the 
Expense Line by $8,500. He explained that this would ac- 
complish restoring the force to sixty uniform members of 
service firefighters and captains and maintain all the fire 
stations that were opened last year and avoid closing any 
stations. This would restore the services to what they were 
a year ago. He listed the many non-fire related services that 
the men and station perform. The Moderator asked the 
Finance Committee for their recommendation. The Board 
was not ready to give their recommendation at this time. 
The Selectmen wanted to hear more discussion. The Town 
Manager was against increasing the budget. He felt that 
the Town couldn't continue to fund areas that would even- 
tually have to be cut back. They are only putting off the 
inevitable. He felt that when the voters didn't vote for the 
override they were sending a message of not wanting to pay 
more taxes. By not wanting more taxes, services would have 
to be cut. A lengthy discussion took place. A number of 
representatives spoke against the policy of closing the West 
Fire Station. They wanted the service to be retained and 
spoke in favor of the motion to do so. Chief Hughes was 
asked about preserving public safety with a two minute res- 
pond time. He explained that once any of the stations are 
closed within the town there would be absolutely no 
guarantee that the two minute respond time could be met. 
The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion to in- 
crease the salary and expense line of the Fire Department. 
Dennis Ready moved the question to stop debate. A ques- 
tion was raised to hear the Finance Committee's recommen- 
dation. The Moderator explained that once a motion to 
stop debate is made no other business can be dicussed at 



this time. He then asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to stop debate, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, 
which left the Chair in doubt, he asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. The amendments voted on for the Police 
and Fire would increase the Public Safety category line item 
8 Salary to be $5,624,005 and line item 9 Expense to 
$438,761 for a total Public Safety budget of $6,089,867. 
The Moderator continued to read the rest of the non- 
numbered line items. Under the Public Works category he 
read the numbered line items total figures, and proceeded 
to read the non-numbered items asking for the need of any 
discussion. 

Edward Hilliard questioned the snow and ice account. 
He wanted to know if the voted amendment figure of 
$100,000 increase to this account included maintaining the 
non-town parking lots. Specifically, sanding and clearing 
the church parking lots. The Town Manager explained that 
this was not the purpose of the increase. The Board of 
Selectmen set a policy that the Town would no longer be 
responsible for maintaining these non-town parking lots. 
The amount was increased in order to establish a base and 
to comply with a Massachusetts financial state law, which 
will not allow a town to overspend unless it appropriates 
the amount that was spent the year before. Edward Hilliard 
read a letter that was sent to him concerning the issue. The 
letter was from the Baptist Church located in the center 
of the Town. It specified the different public service 
organizations that used the churches parking lot for free 
at different times of the year. Boy Scouts, Hockey Associa- 
tions, Fourth of July Celebration, weekly summer band con- 
certs. The church allowed the sewer contractor to store 
equipment on the parking lot, and use the lot as an access 
during the sewer construction. Edward Hilliard felt that 
there are a lot of other Town functions, that the churches 
do allow parking for and wanted the Town Manager to 
realize this. William Spence asked if a motion could be 
made to allow the church an extension of one year, then 
they could make changes within their policies. The Town 
Manager said that while he supported the policy, it was 
the policy of the Board of Selectmen. Selectman Bradford 
Emerson explained that a majority of the five member 
board voted to discontinue plowing the parking lots, but 
that the majority of the Board present tonight support the 
plowing of the parking lots. William Spence wanted to 
make a motion to continue the plowing. Town Counsel said 
the motion was out of order. Only the Board of Selectmen 
could decide that policy issue. 

Jeffrey Stallard moved to amend the budget by taking 
$18,300 from line item 16 Snow & Ice Under Public works; 
and move it to line item 17 Salary under Community Ser- 
vices (Human) for the sole purpose of funding the restora- 
tion of the Elder Services clerk, $10,000 and the Senior Ac- 
tivities Coordinator $8,300. 

Both the Town Manager and the Finance Committee 
were against the motion to amend, Jeffrey Stallard explain- 
ed the reason for his motion. He wanted to maintain the 
same services as last year. A discussion took place. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, 
motion defeated. The dicussion continued. Michael An- 
thony of the Solid Waste Advisory Board, spoke about the 



30 



trash issue. He felt that $530,000 should be removed from 
the sewer betterments receipts and applied to the waste col- 
lection. He said that this would eliminate the yearly fee, 
then residents would only have to pay for the cost of each 
bag that they put out. He further explained his reasoning 
for this. He moved to make this a motion. The Moderator 
asked Town Counsel if this motion could be made by a non- 
representative. James Harrington ruled that only elected 
Town Meeting Representatives could make motions. Dis- 
cussion followed. Richard DeFreitas made the motion for 
Michael Anthony, to reduce waste collection receipts line 
to read $1,012,600 and add the line "transfer revenue from 
Sewer Betterments with the amount of $530,000" under 
the wording of offset receipts. After some confusion was 
cleared up on the exact wording and the placement of the 
figures was established, a lengthy discussion took place. The 
Finance Committee and the Town Manager were against 
this motion. Richard DeFreitas spoke about the Board of 
Health Rules and Regulations that were being established 
concerning the trash issue. He felt that this motion would 
result in a simpler method to collect the trash. He then 
moved to eliminate the tag system entirely and just charge 
each household $112.00. The Town Counsel ruled this out 
of order. A number of representatives spoke in favor and 
against the motion. Barry Balan and Jeffrey Brem, Sewer 
Commissioners, spoke against using the sewer betterment 
fees. These fees should be used only for sewer work. Bar- 
bara Scavezze, Chairman of the Solid Waste Advisory 
Board, said that this motion has not been discussed with 
the Solid Waste Advisory Board, it is Michael Anthony's 
personal opinion. She herself is against the motion and ask- 
ed for the support of the bill and tag system that has been 
adopted by the Board of Selectmen. More lengthy discus- 
sion followed. Richard DeFreitas said he had put this mo- 
tion on the floor for discussion. He doesn't feel that it will 
pass at this point so he moved to withdraw the motion. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

The Moderator continued to read the rest of the non- 
numbered line items listed under the Public Works 
Category, beginning with the Engineer and asked for any 
discussion. At the Waste Collection non-line item, Ronald 
Wetmore moved to amend the expense line item to read 
$270,000 and delete the offset receipts figure of $1,530,250. 
A question was raised concerning the present trash con- 
tract. James Harrington, Town Counsel, explained that the 
present contract is contingent on Town Meeting funding. 
If the money is not voted on then the Town is allowed to 
break the contract. The Finance Committee supported the 
motion. The Board of Selectmen did not. Robert Sexton 
moved to amend Ronald Wetmore's figure of $270,000 to 
be $1,800,000 and delete the offset receipts of $1,530,250 
to be zero. The Finance Committee was not in favor of this 
motion. The Town Manager was not in favor of the mo- 
tion. Selectman Emerson moved the question, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on Robert Sexton's motion. Motion defeated. More discus- 
sion took place. William Logan moved the question to stop 
debate, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote on Ronald Wetmore's motion, motion 
defeated. 

Richard DeFreitas moved to adjourn until Monday, June 
25th at 7:30 p.m. to the McCarthy Middle School 



Auditorium. The Finance Committee was in favor of the 
motion. The Board of Selectmen were against this motion. 
A discussion took place. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to adjourn, motion defeated. Select- 
man Dennis Ready moved to stop debate on the rest of ar- 
ticle 6. The Moderator explained that if this passed then 
there would be no further debate heard on the numbered 
Line items under the Cemetery Department Category, 
Community Services (Culture & Recreation) Category and 
Debt and Interest Category. He attempted a voice vote 
which left the chair in doubt, the tellers came forward and 
conducted a hand count. Result of the hand count, Yes 
78, No 38, %'s is 77 the motion carried. 

He then read the beginning of the motion. Town 
Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate and transfer from available funds the sum 
of $45,837,661 as may be required to defray Town charges 
for the fiscal period from July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which left the chair 
in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
The budget reads as follows: 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

1. Salary 

2. Expense 

3. Out-of-State 
4 Outlay 

5. Legal Services 
Total General Government 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 

6. Total budget 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL: 

7. Total Town Assessment 

PUBLIC SAFETY: 

8. Salary 

9. Expense 

10. Out-of-State 

11. Outlay 
Total Public Safety 

PUBLIC WORKS: 

12. Salary 

13. Expene 

14. Out-of-State 

15. Outlay 

16. Snow & Ice 

Total Dept. of Public Works 
Transfer Offset Receipt (Waste Fees) 
Transfer Offset Receipt (Sewer Fees) 
Net Budget 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT: 

28. Salary 

29. Expense 

30. Out-of-State 

31. Outlay 

Total Cemetery Department 



771,004 

4,921,631 

2,301 

506 

5,000 

5,700,442 



22,578,198 



504,625 



5,624,005 

438,761 

3,500 

23,601 

37 



6,C 



913,891 

2,682,575 

4,501 

2,003 

370,000 

3,972,970 
-1,530,250 
■ 160,000 
2,282,720 



115,971 

27,275 

500 

3,500 

147,246 



31 



COMMUNITY SERVICES (HUMAN SERVICE) 

17. Salary 275,993 

18. Expense 127,708 

19. Out-of-State 1 

20. Outlay ' 2 

Total Budget 403,704 

COMMUNITY SERVICES (CULTURE & RECREATION): 

21. Salary 527,030 

22. Expense 90,828 

23. Out-of-State 500 

24. Outlay 2 

25. Books & Periodicals 107,120 



Total Budget 725,480 

Transfer Offset Receipt (Recreation Fees) -39,375 

Net Budget 686,105 

DEBT & INTEREST 

26. Principal 3,580,000 

27. Interest 2,135,129 

Total Debt & Interest Budget 5,715,129 

Transfer Special Revenue— Cranberry Bog reimbursement -431,250 

Transfer Special Revenue— Sale of Real Estate -99,000 

Net Budget 5,184,879 

TOTAL FY91 BUDGET 45,837,661 

Minus total Available funds (trans & offset recap) -2,259,875 

Net FY91 Budget (Raise & Appropriate) 43,577,786 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee Dwight Hayward, moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $200,000.00 to be used as a 
Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, 
as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Chairman of the Finance Committee, Dwight Hayward, 
explained that this is money that is put aside to cover any 
unforeseen emergencies. This requires a transfer to be done, 
he asked for support of the article. The Board of Select- 
men supported the article. The Town Manager supported 
the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate 
$66,403.00 from unexpended proceeds of amounts 
authorized for capital planning project expenditures under 
Article 10 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1989 and Arti- 
cle 13 of Annual Town Meeting of 1988, transfer and ap- 
propriate the sum of $24,987.00 from unexpended proceeds 
of amounts authorized for capital planning project expen- 
ditures, under article 14 of Special Town Meeting 1986, 
Article 17 of Special Town Meeting 1986, Article 15 of 
Special Town Meeting 1987, to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $392,810.00 to borrow the sum of $919,145.00 and 
to transfer and appropriate the sum of $60,000.00 from 
the Stabilization Fund to fund the following capital 
projects: 

SCHOOL 

1. Mandated Asbestos Removal McCar- 
thy and South Row 100,00. 



2. Mandated Oil Tank Testing and/or 
Replacement 

3. Mandated Handicap Access 

4. McCarthy Roof re-coat 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

5. Purchase 4 cruisers 

TOWN CLERK 

6. Optech Voting Machines 

DPW— HIGHWAY 

7. Road Maintenance 

SEWER 

8. Pick-up Truck 

TOTAL 



51,200. 

849,345. 

57,200. 



60,000. 

34,600. 

300,000. 

11,000. 

$,463,345. 



The Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen, and the 
Town Manager were all in favor of the article. Edward 
Hilliard questioned the mandated items listed under the 
School list and wanted to know why these items were not 
being paid for by the State. Tom Carroll of the School 
Department explained that these are mandated through 
the Federal Government, but the money must be ap- 
propriated first and then the town will apply for reimburse- 
ment from the Federal Government. Linda Allen ques- 
tioned the need for the voting machines. The Town 
Manager explained that right now there is a high trade-in 
value on the present machines, until the end of the year. 
The present machines and system are beginning to show 
wear and tear. The new system is more durable and easier 
to handle. Also there are monies left in the state census 
account that will be applied to the cost in addition to the 
amount shown. Monies should be saved over the long term. 
More discussion took place. Ann Graham questioned the 
effect of this article will be over the next four years. The 
Town Manager answered about $250,000.00 each year. The 
Town Treasurer explained that the debt will be actually 
less in 1992 because we are paying off certain sewer expen- 
ditures, so the actual debt will be less. Dennis Ready mov- 
ed the question. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to instruct the Board of Assessors to 
issue a sum of $16,941.00 from Free Cash in the Treasury 
for the reduction of the tax rate. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is 
monies left over from FY 1989 that is still available and 
will be used for this article. He asked for support of the 
article. The Finance Committee recommended the arti- 
cle. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand the 
Moderator declared the meeting adjourned. 

Tom Carroll requested the floor to speak about the ap- 
proved school budget. Speaking on behalf of the School 
Committee, this has been a very long and hard goingtask 



32 



which has been going on since November. Regardless if the 
body was in favor of the budget or not, he wanted to make 
a point of acknowledging the work, effort and coopera- 
tion, done by the Finance Committee, the Board of Select- 
men, Town Manager and the School Committee to arrive 
at a definite quality budget that the Town could work with. 

The Town Manager Bernard Lynch made an announce- 
ment "that one of key people that has been part of the town 
for the last 12-15 years, who has made the Town Meeting 
work, has been the Town Accountant Ernie Day. This is 
going to be his last Annual Town Meeting." He felt Ernie 
deserved a round of applause for all his efforts. The Town 
Meeting body acknowledged Ernie Day with a round of 
applause and a standing ovation. 

Jeffrey Stallard made a point to wish Tom Carroll of the 
School Department good luck and success on his new ven- 
ture. This announcement was followed with a round of 
applause. 

The meeting adjourned, Thursday, June 21, 1990 at 
12:30 a.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
JULY 23, 1990 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 138 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

The Moderator proceeded to point out the various fire 
exits and entrances around the auditorium. He then went 
over the Town Meeting rules and regulations. A discussion 
took place over the procedures. Comments were raised 
about the same representatives using the microphone and 
the length of discussions. It was also mentioned that 
everyone should stand in line to use the main microphone. 
Especially when either the motions to move the question 
or making amendments to the article. The Moderator ex- 
plained that there is a By-Law Committee, Thomas Doyle 
is the Chairman. The Committee is working on modify- 
ing the Town's present by-laws. Jane McKersie, who is also 
a member of the Committee, explained briefly what the 
committee has drafted so far. The Moderator urged the 
representatives to contact the Committee regarding future 
Town Meeting procedures. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Towle 
moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 1 Mark Gauthier, Member of the 
Board of Health, moved to amend the article by adding 
the following wording to the end of the article, "Provided, 
that any money taken from the stabilization fund, recovered 
by or on behalf of the Town shall be returned to the 
stabilization fund." The Finance Committee was in favor 
of the article with the added amendment. Mark Gauthier 
explained that this article and the next are both about the 
same situation. The ongoing capping project at the land- 
fill on Swain Road was allegedly damaged by a local con- 
tractor, Bob Hicks who's company tore up the area already 
worked on and dumped construction debris there. Due to 
this being a possible health hazard they had to act right 
away, in order to protect the Town and the residents in the 
area. The Board of Health hired an engineering consulting 
firm to assess the damage done to the project. The Board 
of Health felt that this was an emergency expense of 
$53,893 that was not budgeted for and the firm has already 
done the work required, the next article is the actual cost 
for repairing the damage. The Town is in the process of 
suing the alleged contractor for all the expenses that has 
occurred from the damage. The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article and the motion. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to amend. Motion carried. 
A discussion took place. Henry Sullivan spoke against the 
article, he didn't want anymore money spent on taxes. 
Roger Blomgren questioned the $200,000 that was ap- 
propriated in 1988 for the final closing phase of the land- 
fill. Mark Gauthier explained that some of that money has 
been used to draw up plans and pay engineering costs, there 
is $149,000 left. The requested money for these two articles 
is over and above the $149,000. He then gave a breakdown 
of where the money will be going. James Doukszewicz, Town 
Treasurer, clarified that the money is coming from the 
stabilizatin fund. No new tax money will be raised. More 
discussion took place, a number of representatives spoke 
against the article. George Merrill spoke against the arti- 
cle. John Emerson of the Health Department spoke in favor. 
James McBride spoke about the problems the Conserva- 
tion Commission had with Mr. Hicks, and how it was re- 
solved. Mark Gauthier listed the different negotiation dates 
that have taken place with Mr. Hicks with the Board of 
Health. The Board attempted to resolve the situation, but 
as of tonight's meeting the Board hasn't heard from Mr. 
Hicks or his attorney. The Board of Health must comply 
with the Court order of 1985 of the completion of capping, 
the landfill, or else be held in contempt and be charged 
with a $1,000.00 a day fine. The town will pursue the at- 
tempt through the courts if need, in order to get Mr. Hicks 
to reimburse the Town for all the costs involved. Mr. 
Hilliard questioned if there was any consequential damages 
done to the adjourning properties, would the contractor 
be held responsible? Town Counsel, James Harrington ex- 
plained that a Special Counsel with a specialty in en- 
vironmental suits, had been hired by the Town. Due to the 
possibility of pending court action, he couldn't discuss the 
negotiations that have taken place. He assured the body 
that the town's best interest were being protected. The 
counsel had been advised to take the appropriate action 
necessary to recover all money spent for the damage and 
consequential damage that has occurred. The Moderator 
said that a 9/10's vote is needed. He attempted for a 
unanimous vote, which failed. The following tellers came 



33 



forward and a hand count was taken: Richard McClure, 
Dorothy Frawley, Michael McCall, Lucy Simonian. The 
result of the hand count, Yes 110 No 16, 9/10's is 113, the 
motion failed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 The Moderator read the article. 
Mark W. Gauthier, Board of Health Member, moved to 
amend the article by adding the following wording to the 
end of the article. "Provided, that any money taken from 
the stabilization fund recovered by or on behalf of the Town 
shall be returned to the stabilization fund." He then ex- 
plained the reason for the amendment in this article was 
the same for the previous one. He added that the Board 
of Health also is prepared if necessary to file a suit for 
damages, and asked for support of the article. The Finance 
Committee supported the amendment and the article. A 
question was raised on why a 9/10's vote was needed for 
article one, and not this article. Town Counsel explained 
that the services of the engineering consulting fees are con- 
sidered a bill from the previous fiscal year and the statute 
requires a 9/10's vote. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to amend. Motion carried, unanimously. 
A discussion took place. A number of representatives spoke 
for and against the article. Town Counsel explained about 
the DEP taking court action against the Town if the capp- 
ing plan isn't followed through. Even though the Town isn't 
responsible for the alleged damage, it is the Town's responsi- 
bility to meet the time frame set by previous court action. 
James DeProfio a representative from precinct two, where 
the landfill is, asked for support of the article. He felt that 
the people in the immediate area needed the protection 
and that the rest of the Town needed to be protected. James 
McBride of the Conservation Commission asked for sup- 
port of the article because of the environmental factor. 

Thomas Moran asked for article one to be reconsidered. 
He felt that people didn't realize the full intent of the arti- 
cle and were confused about the required 9/10's vote. The 
Finance Committee supported the motion to reconsider. 
Selectman Blomgren wanted the Town Manager to give the 
representatives some financial advise concerning the goal 
of the article. Town Manager Bernard Lynch said that it 
was his understanding that the money mentioned in arti- 
cle one was going to be taken from the balance of the 1985 
appropriation of $200,000.00. He felt that it should be 
done that way, then amended article two's figure of 
$56,107.00 by increasing it $53,893.00 for a total of 
$110,000.00. Henry Sullivan spoke against article one be- 
ing reconsidered. Bernard Lynch explained that the Town 
Counsel and Financial Director differed with him on his 
opinion of using the money from a past appropriation to 
pay the engineeering fee in article one, and increasing ar- 
ticle two's amount. He felt that the article should be recon- 
sidered at this time. Selectman Blomgren asked for Town 
Counsel's opinion on the matter. James Harrington ex- 
plained that the bill mentioned in article one, is a bill from 
the prior fiscal year. By statute it must come before this 
body for a 9/10's vote and it cannot be paid out of the 
money currently appropriated. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on the motion to reconsider, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Andrew Slinish spoke in favor of 
the article. Jeffrey Stallard moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 



ried, unaninously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
which left the chair in doubt. The tellers came forward 
and conducted a hand count. The Moderator read the ar- 
ticle. Mark W. Gauthier moved that the town vote to 
transfer and appropriate from the stabilization fund the 
sum of $53,893 in order to pay outstanding engineering 
consulting fees incurred by the Town in connection with 
restoration work at the Swain Road landfill. Provided that 
any money taken from the stabilization fund recovered by 
or on behalf of the Town shall be returned to the stabiliza- 
tion fund. The hand count was taken, Yes 119 No 14 9/10'a 
vote required of 118, motion carried. 

The Moderator returned to the discussion of article 2. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 CON'T He asked if there was 
any further need for discussion of this article. Hearing none 
he read the article as amended. Mark W. Gauthier moved 
that the town vote to transfer and appropriate from the 
stabilization fund the sum of $56,107 in order to engage 
contractors, and necessary consultants including engineer- 
ing and legal to perform certain cap restoration work at 
the Swain Road landfill site and pursue any legal remedies 
available to the Town of Chelmsford. Provided that any 
money taken from the stabilization fund, recovered by or 
on behalf of the town shall be returned to the stabilization 
fund. He asked for a voice vote which left the chair in 
doubt. The tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken: Yes 116 No 14 %'s is 84, the motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Barry Balan, Chairman of the 
Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to amend 
the vote taken under Article 16 of the warrant for the An- 
nual Town Meeting 1990, by deleting the last sentence re- 
quiring an additional specific exemption under Proposi- 
tion 2 y 2 ■ 

Barry Balan explained that the article that was passed 
at the Annual Town Meeting was amended and voted with 
the added wording of "Any appropriation under this arti- 
cle shall be allowed only upon a specific exemption under 
Proposition 2 V6 ." The intent of the article was to receive 
Town Meeting's permission to put the article on the ballot 
for a vote, as required by statute, either on the election 
ballot of November 1990 or April 1991. Nothing can take 
place until an actual ballot vote is conducted. After Bond 
Counsel review the article as passed with the added wor- 
ding, counsel informed the Sewer Commission that accor- 
ding to statute a special election would have to take place 
within forty-five days of the acceptance of this article. The 
Sewer Commission felt this was an unnecessary added ex- 
pense for the Town to endure, and wanted the last sentence 
removed in order to allow a vote to be taken at the Town's 
convenience. The Finance Committee supported the arti- 
cle. James Doukszewicz, Town Treasurer, questioned if the 
question that was passed in April of 1989 would meet the 
requirements of this article and avoid placing a question 
on any ballot. Town Counsel, James Harrington explained 
that Bond Counsel reviewed that possibility and said that 
another ballot question is required. Ann Graham spoke 
against removing the wording from the article. Bernard 
Ready, one of the petitioners of the original article explain- 
ed that the areas petitioning for sewage availability are in 
desperate need of this service, and asked for the Town 



34 



Meeting support. The Moderator asked for a voice vote. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Dennis Ready petitioner, ex- 
plained the purpose of the article. He wanted to amend 
it by dropping the last three words in the article "and/or 
disposal, and add or act in relation thereto." He felt that 
people are not happy with the present bill and tag system 
that the Town has adopted in order to pick up the trash. 
He proposed a simpler solution. He felt that the $70.00 
present collection fee could be reduced to $30.00. An over- 
ride question would be necessary to do so. The amount re- 
quested would only be the money needed for the collec- 
tion fees, which would include the condominiums. The cost 
he figured to be starting July 1st next year, would be 
$609,000 which would be about 24 cents on the tax rate, 
or with a home value of $165,000 about $38.40 a year. This 
would be instead of the present $70.00, and avoid sending 
out a bill, no paper work, and the $38.40 would be tax 
deductible where the present $70.00 isn't. The Moderator 
read the article with the proposed amendment: 

Dennis J. Ready moved that the Town vote to recommend 
that the Board of Selectmen submit a question for inser- 
tion on a ballot to be voted upon by the Town to override 
the provision of Proposition 2V£ for the purpose of fun- 
ding municipal/household solid waste collection, or act in 
relation thereto." The Finance Committee supported the 
article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to amend the article, motion carried. Richard 
DeFreitas spoke against the article, he didn't feel that the 
condominium owners would go along with the propossal, 
he felt that the Town should get out of the trash business 
if it cannot provide the service within the tax structure. 
He didn't agree with the present Board of Health Rules 
and Regulators. He wanted them to be a by-law and 
debated on Town Meeting floor and then sent to the At- 
torney General for approval. Jeff Stallard asked if this ar- 
ticle passed, would it be mandatory that the question be 
placed on the ballot. Town Counsel ruled its not man- 
datory, only the Board of Selectmen could consider put- 
ting the question on the ballot. He proposed an amend- 
ment, which Town Counsel ruled out of order. A discus- 
sion took place. A number of people spoke against the ar- 
ticle. Scott McCaig moved the question. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, which left the chair in doubt. He 
asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. Bill Spence 
expressed the concerns and frustrations that he felt peo- 
ple had about the Town's present financial situation. 
Department heads and elected and appointed officials 
should be more aware of controlling the costs of the Town. 
More discussion followed. Kay Roberts moved the question. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried 
unanimously. He then asked for a voice vote on the article 
as amended. This left the Chair in doubt, he asked for a 
show of hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, 
explained that the article concerns selling the North Town 
Hall property to a non-profit organization, by way of the 
bidding process according to State Law. Currently there 
is an interested party who originally was willing to just lease 
the building, but the Town could only give them a ten year 
lease. It would be in best interest for all if the building could 



be sold as is. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Finance Committee were not prepared to give 
any recommendations at this point. Ronald Wetmore 
representing the Masonic Temple, gave a brief explanation. 
His organization was the interested party mentioned as will- 
ing to lease the property. They would only be allowed a 
ten year lease and because they estimated a cost of at least 
$100,000 for improvements of the property they wanted a 
longer lease, which was impossible. The Masons were will- 
ing to purchase the property through the bidding process. 
Samuel Brink moved to amend the article by adding to 
the end, "Also contingent upon suitable storage space be- 
ing provided elsewhere for the organizations now using the 
North Town Hall for storage." Samuel Brink explained that 
many youth organizations have stored their sporting equip- 
ment in this building for many years for use on the nearby 
fields. Bernard Lynch said that this would have been con- 
sidered as a condition when the bid was made, and didn't 
see any problem with adding it to the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the amendment, which 
left the Chair in doubt. He asked for a show of hands, mo- 
tion carried. More discussion took place. Representatives 
spoke in favor of selling the building by way of the bid- 
ding process. They expressed concerns about it being sold 
for $1.00. It was explained that it will be advertised and 
seal bids will be requested, and awarded to the highest bid- 
der, not auctioned off. It was questioned on why only non- 
profit organizations will be allowed to bid. Selectman 
Johnson explained that because of the neighborhood loca- 
tion. The property is not in a commercial zone. By keep- 
ing it limited to nonprofit bidders, the Selectmen felt they 
would have more control on the occupants. Ronald Wet- 
more explained because of the reverter clause his group 
is not interested in making any money from the Town. As 
long as the Masons use it, they will invest in the property. 
By keeping the historical aspect in mind they intent to bring 
it back to an attractable buyable status. If at any time the 
Masons no longer want the building the Town will get back 
a building that has been greatly improved. Robert Brooks 
moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article as amend- 
ed, motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as 
follows: 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey for considera- 
tion to be determined, all right, title and interest if any, 
held by the Town in the North Town Hall on Princeton 
Street; provided however that any sale shall be contingent 
upon a right of reversion to the Town in the event that the 
property is used for purposes other than those negotiated 
by the Selectmen,, and further contingent upon the Town 
being granted a right first refusal upon any subsequent sale. 
Also contingent upon suitable storage space being provid- 
ed elsewhere for the organizations now using the North 
Town Hall for storage. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Bernard Lynch, Town Manager 
moved to withdraw this article, due to the passage of arti- 
cle 5, this article is no longer needed. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 



35 



UNDER ARTICLE 7 Bernard Lynch, Town Manager 
moved that the Town vote to amend article 6 of the 1990 
Annual Town Meeting by transferring and appropriating 
the sum of $6,000 from line item #21 Commumity Services 
Salaries to Community Services Expenses line item #22. 

Bernard Lynch explained that the Recreation Depart- 
ment had set up a revolving account in order to be self 
supporting. They tought that they could use this account 
to cover expenses. This cannot be done. They must have 
separate accounts. The salary account had an overage of 
$6,000 in it. This article would allow the money to be 
transferred from the salary account and used as an expense 
account. The Finance Committee recommended the arti- 
cle. D. Lorraine Lambert wanted to amend the article to 
be increased by an additional $65,000 in order to increase 
the Library salaries account. Town Counsel James Harr- 
ington ruled the motion out of order. The article can only 
address the $6,000 figure. He then explained the procedure 
she should follow in order to get an article on the October 
meeting. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the ar- 
ticle, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Jeffrey Stallard moved that the 
Town vote to amend article 6 of the 1990 Annual Town 
Meeting by transferring and appropriating the sum of 
$18,700 from the General Government Line Item 2 Ex- 
penses, to Community Services (Human Service) line Item 
17 Salary. 

Jeffrey Stallard explained the article. This is to restore 
two staff positions at the Senior Center. The Clerk's posi- 
tion had been reduced from 37 V& hours to 20 hours and 
the Activity Coordinator had been reduced from 20 hours 
to hours. He felt that these positions were needed. The 
Finance Committee questioned the wording of the motion. 
Town Counsel explained that the wording on the original 
petition was not correct. He and Jeffrey Stallard rewrote 
the motion in order to make it comply and be in order so 
a vote could be allowed. The Board of Selectmen did not 
recommend the article. Town Manager explained that he 
felt this article should come before the Town Meeting Body 
for a vote. That is why he wanted Town Counsel to work 
with Jeffrey Stallard on the wording. He felt like at this 
past Jiine budget discussions, he supports the intention, but 
unfortunately cuts do have to be made and this is one of 
the areas. He did not support the motion. Jeffrey Stallard 
asked for support of the article. John Coppinger explain- 
ed that he respected Jeffrey Stallard's motion. However, he 
agrees with Bernard Lynch that cuts have to be made, be- 
cause next year the situation will be a lot worse. He asked 
Bernard Lynch what the shortfall will be for next year. Ber- 
nard Lynch said so far he estimated approximately 1 to 
1.5 million. Local aid will be a factor and this is without 
trash in the budget. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
this left the Chair in doubt, he asked for a show of hands, 
motion defeated. 

The Moderator announced tht the next scheduled 
meeting will be the annual on October 1st. Seeing there 



was no further business at hand he adjourned the meeting. 
The Meeting adjourned at 11:20 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

STATE PRIMARY ELECTION 

September 18, 1990 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at: 

Precinct 1: Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson 

Road 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson 

Road 
Precinct 4: Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 
Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium, 25 Maple Road 
Precinct 6: Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School Small Gymnasium, 250 

North Road 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School Small Gymnasium, 250 

North Road 
Precinct 9: Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 

On Tuesday the eighteenth day of September, 1990, from 
7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates 
of political parties for the following offices: 

U.S. Senator For the Commonwealth 

Governor For the Commonwealth 

Lt. Governor For the Commonwealth 

Attorney General For the Commonwealth 

Secretary For the Commonwealth 

Treasurer For the Commonwealth 

Auditor For the Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress .... Fifth Congressional District 

Councillor Third Councillor District 

Senator in General Court Fifth Mdsx. Senatorial District 

Representative in General 

Court Sixteenth Mdsx. Representative 

District 

District Attorney Northern District 

Register of Probate Middlesex County 

County Treasurer Middlesex County 

County Commissioner Middleex County 



36 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Given under our hands this 7th day of September, A.D. 
1990. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN OF 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Bonita A. Towle, Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

Pursuant to the within warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Town Office Building Gym, Harrington School 
Gymnasium, Harrington School Gymnasium, Westland 
School Cafeteria, Byam School Cafetorium, Westland 
School Cafeteria, McCarthy Middle School Small Gym- 
nasium, McCarthy Middle School Small Gymnasium, and 
Town Office Building Gym, and Town Office Building 
Lobby. 

Signed: 
William E. Spence 
Constable 
A True Copy Attest, 
William E. Spence, Constable 



DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY 

September 18, 1990 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 



Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Total 



U.S. SENATOR 

John F. Kerry 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

GOVERNOR 

Francis X. Bellotti 
Evelyn F. Murphy 
John Silber 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

LT. GOVERNOR 

Marjorie O'Neill Clapprood 
William B. Golden 
Nicholas A. Paleologos 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

James M. Shannon 
L. Scott Harshbarger 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

SECRETARY 

Michael J. Connolly 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



393 


384 


379 


438 


405 


425 


375 


417 


365 


3581 


























1 


1 


200 


167 


218 


187 


199 


230 


218 


188 


186 


1793 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


179 


192 


178 


189 


198 


195 


184 


193 


164 


1672 


16 


15 


11 


17 


12 


12 


15 


12 


17 


128 


381 


327 


395 


400 


383 


433 


382 


390 


351 


3442 











2 








1 








3 


17 


17 


13 


17 


11 


15 


11 


10 


20 


131 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


258 


239 


240 


248 


264 


266 


258 


269 


241 


2283 


147 


148 


140 


184 


138 


176 


138 


148 


129 


1348 


129 


89 


147 


130 


140 


148 


118 


118 


128 


1147 


59 


75 


70 


63 


62 


65 


79 


70 


54 


597 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


227 


233 


220 


262 


239 


236 


213 


261 


209 


2100 


347 


295 


357 


342 


343 


402 


357 


322 


323 


3088 


19 


23 


20 


21 


22 


17 


23 


22 


20 


187 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


352 


347 


349 


405 


357 


410 


347 


366 


326 


3259 


























1 


1 


241 


204 


248 


220 


247 


245 


246 


239 


225 


2115 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 



37 



TREASURER 



William Francis Galvin 


265 


262 


242 


280 


273 


310 


272 


270 


233 


2407 


George Keverian 


133 


99 


144 


155 


128 


143 


128 


152 


127 


1209 


Dick Kraus 


128 


107 


138 


115 


128 


123 


131 


100 


126 


1096 


All Others 


























1 


1 


Blanks 


67 


83 


73 


75 


75 


79 


62 


83 


65 


662 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


AUDITOR 






















A. Joseph DeNucci 


329 


329 


339 


385 


341 


395 


329 


353 


317 


3117 


All Others 


























1 


1 


Blanks 


264 


222 


258 


240 


263 


260 


264 


252 


234 


2257 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dist. 




















Chester G. Atkins" 


368 


343 


363 


386 


383 


396 


370 


388 


361 


3358 


All Others 


























1 


1 


Blanks 


225 


208 


234 


239 


221 


259 


223 


217 


190 


2016 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist. 






















Robert B. Kennedy 


343 


308 


328 


392 


330 


382 


323 


359 


303 


3068 


Edward F. Flood 


145 


126 


168 


130 


148 


167 


136 


126 


144 


1290 


Blanks 


105 


117 


101 


103 


126 


106 


134 


120 


105 


1017 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


SENATOR IN GENERAL CT. 5th Mldsx 






















Bryan P. McCarthy 


349 


336 


340 


402 


352 


370 


319 


377 


305 


3150 


All Others 


























1 


1 


Blanks 


244 


215 


257 


223 


252 


285 


274 


228 


246 


2224 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL CT. 


16th Mldsx. 




















All Others 








1 








1 


1 





5 


8 


Blanks 


593 


551 


596 


625 


604 


654 


592 


605 


547 


5367 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern Dist. 






















Joseph K. Mackey 


142 


151 


137 


161 


151 


143 


137 


143 


153 


1318 


Thomas F. Reilly 


280 


251 


302 


302 


243 


341 


277 


277 


227 


2500 


George W. Spartichino 


98 


94 


76 


94 


119 


87 


98 


96 


91 


852 


All Others 


























1 


1 


Blanks 


73 


55 


82 


68 


91 


84 


81 


89 


80 


703 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


REGISTER OF PROBATE Mldsx. Cty. 






















Thomas J. Larkin 


291 


279 


318 


314 


290 


329 


296 


311 


274 


2702 


Joseph L. Bradley 


170 


152 


153 


180 


170 


196 


153 


148 


148 


1470 


Blanks 


132 


120 


126 


131 


144 


130 


144 


146 


130 


1203 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 


TREASURER Mldsx. Cty. 






















James G. Fahey Jr. 


202 


192 


216 


243 


205 


237 


194 


199 


165 


1853 


Warren McManus 


95 


78 


96 


97 


100 


99 


87 


93 


87 


832 


Kevin J. Palmer 


120 


118 


112 


110 


120 


122 


102 


126 


125 


1055 


Blanks 


176 


163 


173 


175 


179 


197 


210 


197 


175 


1635 


TOTAL 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 



38 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER MIdsx. 

Bill Schmidt 

Barbara J. Auger Collins 

William J. Eckland 

Francis X. Flaherty 

William S. McFarland 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



73 


86 


105 


111 


93 


108 


96 


90 


92 


854 


118 


93 


114 


118 


107 


126 


112 


121 


125 


1034 


59 


53 


58 


62 


78 


59 


61 


61 


48 


539 


128 


118 


106 


118 


106 


144 


88 


107 


92 


1007 


51 


46 


44 


60 


51 


52 


49 


56 


38 


447 


164 


155 


170 


156 


169 


166 


187 


170 


157 


1494 


593 


551 


597 


625 


604 


655 


593 


605 


552 


5375 



REPUBLICAN PRIMARY ELECTION 

September 18, 1990 



US SENATOR 

Daniel W Daly 
Jim Rappaport 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

GOVERNOR 

Steven D. Pierce 
William F. Weld 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

LT. GOVERNOR 

Argeo Paul Cellucci 
Peter G. Torkildsen 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Guy A. Carbone 
William C. Sawyer 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

SECRETARY 

. Paul McCarthy 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

TREASURER 

Joseph D. Malone 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

AUDITOR 

Douglas J. Murray 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th hki 

Donal T Coleman 

John F. MacGovern 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


TOTAL 


133 


139 


139 


134 


152 


167 


143 


120 


149 


1276 


320 


333 


306 


270 


409 


320 


411 


317 


343 


3029 


49 


53 


49 


41 


74 


49 


73 


35 


46 


469 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


159 


181 


151 


187 


208 


152 


184 


149 


155 


1526 


335 


337 


341 


253 


422 


371 


439 


321 


377 


3196 




















1 





1 


2 


8 


7 


2 


5 


5 


13 


3 


2 


5 


50 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


310 


305 


293 


241 


389 


342 


366 


279 


313 


2838 


142 


177 


147 


155 


186 


138 


199 


150 


173 


1467 























1 





1 


50 


43 


54 


49 


60 


56 


62 


42 


52 


468 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


153 


187 


196 


156 


182 


158 


216 


175 


168 


1591 


291 


262 


229 


229 


365 


300 


312 


240 


302 


2530 

















1 











1 


58 


76 


69 


60 


88 


77 


99 


57 


68 


652 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


306 


335 


311 


289 


379 


365 


371 


282 


350 


2988 


196 


190 


183 


156 


256 


171 


256 


190 


188 


1786 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


362 


380 


355 


325 


436 


410 


426 


315 


413 


3422 


140 


145 


139 


120 


199 


126 


201 


157 


125 


1352 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


288 


321 


299 


266 


365 


348 


349 


273 


329 


2838 


214 


204 


195 


179 


270 


188 


278 


199 


209 


1936 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


St. 

148 


147 


113 


127 


130 


140 


139 


126 


136 


1206 


218 


236 


245 


214 


324 


272 


298 


213 


281 


2301 


136 


142 


136 


104 


181 


124 


190 


133 


121 


1267 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 



39 



COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist. 






















Thomas F. Healy 


291 


321 


292 


268 


367 


348 


351 


269 


329 


2836 


Blanks 


211 


204 


202 


177 


268 


188 


276 


203 


209 


1938 


TOTAL 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


SENATOR IN GENERAL CT. 5th Mldsx. 






















Lucile "Cile" Hicks 


335 


337 


349 


320 


429 


396 


435 


303 


392 


3296 


Blanks 


167 


188 


145 


125 


206 


140 


192 


169 


146 


1478 


TOTAL 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL CT. 16th Mldsx. 




















Carol C. Cleven 


323 


341 


355 


285 


429 


403 


444 


317 


344 


3241 


Nicholas Theochares 


162 


155 


126 


146 


184 


114 


163 


137 


186 


1373 


Blanks 


17 


29 


13 


14 


22 


19 


20 


18 


8 


160 


TOTAL 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern Dist. 






















All Others 


2 


1 








4 





2 


1 


2 


12 


Blanks 


500 


524 


494 


445 


631 


536 


625 


471 


536 


4762 


TOTAL 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


REGISTER OF PROBATE Mldsx. Cty. 






















Donna M. Lambert 


315 


349 


318 


297 


405 


366 


381 


286 


333 


3050 


Blanks 


187 


176 


176 


148 


230 


170 


246 


186 


205 


1724 


TOTAL 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


TREASURER Mldsx. Cty. 






















Walter Fish 


311 


340 


308 


283 


389 


358 


370 


275 


317 


2951 


Blanks 


191 


185 


186 


162 


246 


178 


257 


197 


221 


1823 


TOTAL 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER Mldsx. Cty. 






















All Others 


2 








1 








1 


2 





6 


Blanks 


500 


525 


494 


444 


635 


536 


626 


470 


538 


4768 


TOTAL 


502 


525 


494 


445 


635 


536 


627 


472 


538 


4774 



40 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
October 1, 1990 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 141 Representative Town 
Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator pointed out the fire exits located within 
the hall. Selectman Ready announced that the Holiday 
Decorating Committee is having a fund raiser and listed 
the names of people to contact. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman 
Towle then moved that the reading of the entire warrant 
be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked to allow Mary Mahoney a non- 
resident who is the Director of the Library to address the 
Town Meeting Body if need be from time to time. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Bonita Towle 
moved that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town Of- 
ficers and Committees. 

The Moderator explained that there were three commit- 
tee reports to be heard and that he would take them in 
alphabetical order. 

The Blueprint 2000 Committee: The Town Manager 
Bernard Lynch explained that this committee was formed 
ten months ago. The members are one board member from 
the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Com- 
mittee, also the Town Manager and the School Superin- 
tendent. It's a strategic planning Committee which will look 
at the long term plans of the community and assess the 
Town's needs for the next five to ten years. He asked each 
Town Meeting Member to have ten residents of their 
precincts fill out and return a questionnaire that he is pro- 
viding them with for actual input. 

The Moderator asked for a motion, which was so mov- 
ed to accept the report as given. He then asked for a voice 
vote to accept the report given, motion carried. 

The By-Law Committee: Thomas Doyle, Chairman of 
the Committee explained that this five member commit- 
tee was formed due to the adoption of the Chater. The pur- 
pose is to review any and all existing Town By-laws and 
make recommendations to conform them with the provi- 
sions of the charter. The Committee submitted their recom- 
mendations which appears as articles 9, 18, and 19, of the 
warrant. 

The Moderator asked for a motion, which was so mov- 
ed to accept the report as given. He then asked for a voice 
vote to accept the report given, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



Code of Ethics Committee: John Coddaire, Chairman 
of the Committee gave a brief presentation. The Commit- 
tee was also formed as a result of the Charter adoption. 
The seven member board was appointed by the Moderator 
with the purpose of preparing a code of ethics for the Town 
of Chelmsford. The Code of Ethics shall be applicable to 
all elected and appointed officials and town employees. The 
Committee's recommendation appears as article 14 in the 
warrant. 

The Moderator asked for motion, which was so moved 
to accept the report as given. He then asked for a voice 
vote to accept the report given, motion carried, unani- 
mously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
explained that when the Annual Town Meeting ended in 
June the Town had a balanced budget. Since then, three 
budgetary alterations have taken place which resulted as 
a shortfall of SI. 6 million dollars. The Massachusetts Legis- 
lature reneged on a commitment to level fund local aid. 
This resulted in a loss of $598,551.00. The availability of 
free cash to be appropriated is only $478,010.00, a loss of 
$677,000. This is due to outstanding property taxes which 
are nearly 75% above normal. Foreclosures and challeng- 
ed assessments account for much of this increase. The 
decrease in the Town Managers projections for miscel- 
laneous receipts by $236,523.00. The majority of this 
reduction is in motor vehicle excise tax receipts which ac- 
tually decreased in FY90. 

He said by using the remaining monies of the Brookline 
decision, the budget shortfall problem can immediately be 
reduced by $392,810.00 through borrowing for approved 
capital items rather than appropriating funds. By decreas- 
ing the appropriation for employee health insurance trust 
fund by $200,000.00. This still leaves the Budget shortfall 
of $1,012 million dollars. This figure has been divided in 
half with the Town and School both reducing their budgets 
by $506,430.00. 

He then went through a list of reductions under the town 
side, citing his recommended and amended figures. The 
General Government was reduced by restructuring the 
Veterans, and Town Manager's Office personnel. Hiring a 
new Town Accountant at a lower rate. Employee's benefits 
in the area of sick time buy back for non-union employees. 
Traffic and Safety Expenses have been reduced. The Salary 
account will be reduced by $4,500.00, and the expenses 
have an amended figure of $291,000.00. He felt that at 
the end of his presentation the School Department would 
give their recommendations, but he is recommending the 
amended figure of $496,000.00. Under Public Safety he 
recommended a reduction in salaries with an amended 
figure of $245,000.00, and expenses by $2,000.00. He was 
cutting back on the travel allowance and miscellaneous ex- 
penses in the Inspection Department. Within the Police 
Department it would be reduced in salaries. By working 
with the Chief hopefully due to the elimination of the 
Highway Superintendent position, additional monies are 
available and may avoid layoffs for some time. But clearly 
there would be a reduction in overtime, and reorganiza- 
tion due to the retirement of the Deputy Chief may save 
additional money. The Fire Department will still be able 



41 



to keep the West Fire Station opened. What will occur will 
not be the filling of the 3rd man position at the North Fire 
Station. South, East, and West stations will have two men. 
Public Works, reducing the salaries by $35,252.00, by 
eliminating the Highway Superintendent's position and 
reorganization will take place. Cutting back in overtime, 
careful of call outs, when they occur reclassify the position 
to reduce it to part-time people, the expenses would be 
reduced by $54,825.00, by cutting back on road repairs. 
The Sewer Department's out of state travel would be re- 
duced by $1,500.00 and Snow and Ice account would be 
reduced by $20,000.00. Community Service salaries would 
be reduced by $11,500.00. By eliminating the Veteran's 
clerical staff by combining with the Council on Aging 
facilities. The Council on Aging Clerk's clerical hours would 
be increased from 20 to 30 hrs. Due to this reorganization 
eventually the Council on Aging's Director will assume some 
of the Veteran Agent's responsibilities. Expenses would be 
reduced by $24,738.00. The reduction will be under miscel- 
laneous expenses of Elder Affairs. And without effecting 
services a great deal, the Health Department's reduction 
in the Mosquito Control & Hazardous Waste Day programs. 
Under the Community Services, the Library is reducing 
in salaries by $6,459.00 and books and periodicals by 
$24,738.00. The Cemetery Department will reduce the 
salaries by $3,418.00 and expenses by $2,950.00. He felt 
that these cuts were made with the minimal impact to the 
citizens of the Town. Both libraries will be kept open, along 
with all the fire stations. Most of the programs were kept 
in tack. Some personnel have been reduced due to the reor- 
ganization process. He stressed that none of the cuts were 
easy particularly for the department heads. If these cuts 
aren't made tonight then next year's level funded budget 
could have a shortfall of $1.4 million dollars. He asked for 
the body's support on his decisions. 

The Moderator read the motion again with the figures 
which were to be amended. Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved to amend the following figures: Under General 
Government Line item 2 expenses $291,000.00. Chelmsford 
School Department Line item 6 total Budget $496,000.00. 
Public Safety Line item 8 Salary $245,000.00. Public Works 
Line item 12 Salary $34,252. 

The Finance Commmittee recommended the motion to 
amend. The Moderator explained that he would go 
through each section and ask for any discussion. He read 
the General Government thru Chelmsford School Depart- 
ment. Richard Codling spoke about the continuing asbestos 
removal program being done and urged for it to stop, and 
to come up with a system to avoid the additional expenses 
that occur when snow removal is done on weekends. An- 
drew Alinish wanted to hear the School Committee's recom- 
mendation. Chairman Wendy Marcks said it was the School 
Committee's intent to leave the Town Meeting with a 
balanced budget. The Committee had to adjourn their 
scheduled meeting tonight due to the beginning of the 
Town Meeting, but would continue the meeting after the 
adjournment of the Town Meeting. At which time a for- 
mal vote would be taken on where the cuts would be made. 
The vote would be based on the Town Meeting's action of 
the figure voted for the total School budget. The Superin- 
tendent did have a presentation prepared to show where 
the cuts would be made, if the body wanted to hear it. The 



Moderator asked for a show of hands of those interested 
in hearing Superintendent Moser's presentation. Motion 
carried. Superintendent Moser gave a list of reductions. 
$276,237.00 under staffing would be reduced. Under Pro- 
gram Operations $60,175.00. Under Supplies and Equip- 
ment $107,813.00. And under substitutes a reduction of 
$61,775,000. He then proceeded to explain what the ac- 
tual reductions would be. Every student in general will be 
effected by these cuts. A discussion took place. Grace Dunn 
spoke against the proposed cuts. The Moderator read fur- 
ther along where under Community Services Library 
Trustee, Janet Hendl, expressesd the Trustee's concerns 
about the cuts being made under the Library budget. 
William Keohane spoke about the Town's responsibility to 
maintain it's operating budget on its own. The communi- 
ty shouldn't depend on the state or federal government's 
help. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to amend. Motion carried. He then asked for a voice vote 
on the article as amended, motion carried, unanimously. 
The article reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the town vote 
to decrease the sum of money to be raised and appropriated 
to defray Town charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 
1990 to June 30, 1991 by the sum of $1,212,467.00 by 
decreasing the following line items of the Fiscal 1991 
Budget: 



LINE 


ACCOUNT 

General Government 


DECREASE 


1 


Salary 


4,500.00 


2 


Expenses 

Chelmsford School Department 


291,000.00 


6 


Total Budget 
Public Safety 


496,000.00 


8 


Salary 


245,000.00 


9 


Expenses 
Public Works 


2,000.00 


12 


Salary 


35,252.00 


13 


Expenses 


54,825.00 


14 


Out of State 


1,500.00 


16 


Snow and Ice 


20,000.00 



21 
25 



28 
29 



Community Services (Human Services) 

Salary 11,500.00 

Expenses 13,325.00 

Community Services (Cult, and Recreation) 

Salary 6,459.00 

Books and Periodicals 24,738.00 



Cemetery Department 

Salary 
Expenses 



Total 



3,418.00 
2,950.00 

1,212,467.00 



UNDER ARTICLE 3 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board of Assessors 
to issue the sum of $478,010.00 from Free Cash in the 
Treasury for the reduction of the fiscal year 1991 tax rate. 



42 



The Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that this 
is part of the budget process balancing and asked for sup- 
port. The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
supported the article. A discussion took place. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 



Michael McCall, Patrick Calnan, Helen Manahan, 
Dorothy Frawley. 

Result Yes 59 No 66, motion defeated, the discussion 
continued. 



UNDER ARTICLE 4 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 8 of the June 4, 1990 Annual Town Meeting by 
reducing the sum of money to be raised and appropriated 
by $392,810 and by increasing the sum of money to be bor- 
rowed by $392,810.00 for a total sum to be borrowed 
$1,311,955.00. 

Bernard Lynch explained the article. The Finance Com- 
mittee recommended the article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote, motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Treasurer James Doukszewicz 
moved that the Town vote to rescind the balance of the 
authorized but unissued debt under Article 10 of the 1989 
Annual Town Meeteing in the amount of $150,000.00. 

James Doukszewicz explained the article. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Select- 
men were in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Thomas Firth, Chairman of the 
Planning Board moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-law Section 2600 INTENSITY OF 
USE SCHEDULE, by deleteing "15" under Maximum 
Building Coverage Percent in the CA District (NEIGH- 
BORHOOD COMMERCIAL) and inserting "30." 

Planning Board Member Christine Gleason explained 
the purpose of the article. The property owner's represen- 
tative came before the Planning Board citing that when 
the zoning master plan was done in 1986 the intensity and 
use schedule reflected a change that wasn't intended. The 
CA zone should have been kept at 30%. Instead a change 
of 15% was added. After researching the issue the board 
recommended to amend the zoning section. She then read 
the Board's recommendation. "The Planning Board held 
a public hearing on September 12, 1990 and voted 
unanimously (6-0) to recommend amendment to the 
Chelmsford Zoning by-law section 2600 (Intensity of Use 
Schedule), by deleting '15' under Maximum Building 
Coverage Percent in the CA District (Neighborhood Com- 
mercial and inserting '30;' or act in relation thereto." A 
discussion took place. The Finance Committee and Board 
of Selectmen are in favor of the article. Sue Olsen requested 
to have the owner of the property identified and question- 
ed the location of the property. The owner was Raymond 
Carye and the area is the Chelmsford Mall located on Rt. 
110. A discussion took place. It was stated that the in- 
dividual presently owes payment on real estate tax bills. 
The property is being appealed to the Appealant Tax 
Board. Plus there are other areas in town where the CA 
zone exits that this effects. A number of Representatives 
spoke against the article. Robert Sexton moved to table the 
article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote which left 
the chair in doubt. The following tellers came forward and 
a hand count was taken: 



Donald Keirstead spoke in favor of the article. The non- 
payment of the real estate taxes shouldn't be the issue at 
hand. This property and any other listed in a CA zone 
shouldn't be kept non-conforming because of an oversite. 
John Emerson cautioned the Representatives on their com- 
ments being made, they could be held liable. Sue Olsen 
questioned if a possible lawsuit could be initiated as a result 
of non-passage of the article. Town Counsel James Har- 
rington expressed that the issue shouldn't be influenced by 
the non-payment of taxes. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the article. Motion defeated, John Emerson re- 
quested "that it be written into the Town Meeting minutes 
as being opposed to that vote." 

UNDER ARTICLE 7Chairman of the Planning Board 
Thomas Firth, explained the purpose of the article. The 
land in question was located between the old Town Hall 
and Fire Department on North Road. It was listed as "P" 
public instead of RA residential. He then read the Board's 
recommendation: "The Planning Board held a public hear- 
ing of September 12, 1990 and voted unanimously (6-0) 
to recommend a vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Zon- 
ing Map to change from Public District (P) to Residential 
District (RA) for Parcel 1/1-3 North Road and Parcel II/5 
North road; or act in relation thereto." 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen have no recommendation. The Moder- 
ator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 
The article reads as follows: 

Thomas Firth, Chairman of the Planning Board moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Zon- 
ing Map to change from Public District (P) to Residential 
A District (RA) the following described parcels: 

Parcel I. A certain parcel of land located at 1-3 

North Road on the easterly side of 
said North Road containing 10,786 
square feet of land more or less and 
being shown on Assessors Map 104 as 
Lot 40 and being bounded and 
described as follows: 

BEGINNING at the southwesterly cor- 
ner of said premises on the easterly 
side of said Road and at the nor- 
thwesterly corner of land of the Town 
of Chelmsford; thence Easterly by said 
Town land, one hundred forty-five feet 
to a corner; thence Northerly still by 
said Town land and by land supposed 
to belong, now or formerly, to 
Theodore W. Emerson, sixty-seven feet 
to land conveyed by Mary Elizabeth 
Richardson to Leslie Richardson Davis 
by deed dated October 30, 1907, 
recorded with Middlesex North 



43 



District Registry of Deeds, Book 441, 
page 492; thence Westerly by said last 
mentioned land, one hundred forty- 
two and 70/100 feet to said North 
Road; thence Southerly along said 
Road, eighty feet to the point of 
beginning; or however otherwise said 
premises may be measured, bounded 
or described. 

Parcel II. A certain parcel of land located at 5 

North Road on the easterly side of 
said North Road containing 9,853 
square feet more or less and being 
shown on Assessors Map 104, Lot 39 
and being bounded and described as 
follows: 

BEGINNING at the Northwesterly 
corner of the granted premises at said 
road and at land belonging to the 
Town of Chelmsford, known as the 
"Schoolhouse Lot;" thence running: 

EASTERLY along said last named land one hun- 
dred thirty-eight and 67/100 (138.67) 
feet to land now or formerly of James 
P. Emerson; thence running 

SOUTHERLY along said last named land, seventy 

and 16/100 (70.16) feet to land now or 
formerly of Mary Elizabeth Richard- 
son; thence running 

WESTERLY along said last named land, one hun- 
dred forty-two and 70/100 (142.70) 
feet to said road; thence running 

NORTHERLY along said road, seventy (70) feet to 
the point of beginning. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 The Moderator read the article. 
Chief of Police Raymond McKeon explained the article. 
Due to a situation that occurred in another town during 
the summer, it was felt that the Town's present soliciting 
by-law should be amended to reflect more stringent rules 
and regulations. The Finance Committee spoke in favor 
of the article, but questioned the non-profit organization 
wording. A discussion took place. Dennis Ready moved to 
amend the first paragraph by inserting the words "for pro- 
fit" before organization in the last sentence. And at 
paragraph 4 delete the word "and" after forenoon and in- 
sert the word "or after." The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried. Linda Allen moved to amend the se- 
cond paragraph by adding The Police Chief may waive the 
$25.00 fee at his discretion. A discussion took place. It was 
felt that the Police Chief shouldn't have to decide on waiv- 
ing the required fee for any person or organization. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. Robert 
Joyce questioned if this would apply to businesses. It was 
answered as yes. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on 
the article as amended, motion carried, unanimously. The 
article reads as follows: 



Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-laws by deleting Article VI Police 
Regulations Section 16 Solicitors and inserting in its place 
the following: 

Section 16 Licensing of Solicitors 

1. It shall be unlawful for any person to solicit 
orders, or subscription for goods or services, or 
to sell goods or services door to door, in the 
Town without first having registered with the 
Police Department. The registrant shall provide 
proof of identification, his signature, the name 
of his employer, the type of products or services 
which he or she is soliciting, and such other in- 
formation as may be requested by the Police 
Department. Each person soliciting in the Town 
on behalf of a corporation, business, or other 
for profit organization shall be required to 
register with the Police Department. 

2. Each person shall pay to the Police Department 
at the time of registration an annual registra- 
tion fee of twenty-five dollars. 

3. a) Each person who pays the fee provided 

herein shall be furnished a permit in- 
dicating that he or she has registered and 
showing the dates covered by such 
registration. 

b) Each person shall at all times while 
soliciting in the Town carry upon his person 
the registration permit and the same shall 
be exhibited by such person whenever re- 
quired to do so by any police officer or by 
any person solicited. 

c) In addition to the permit, the Town shall 
issue an identification badge to every person 
registered hereunder. Permittees shall wear 
their badges in such a manner that the 
badges may be easily read while transacting 
business. If badge becomes damaged or 
obscured, the permittee shall return it to 
the Town and receive another badge. 
Badges issued hereunder shall conspicuously 
state that the Town of Chelmsford does not 
endorse the goods or services being 
solicited. 

d) Permits and identification badges shall be 
used only by the person to whom they were 
issued, and may not be transferred or ex- 
tended to include any other person. 

4. There shall be no door to door solicitation or 
selling before 9 o'clock in the forenoon or after 
6 o'clock in the afternoon. 

5. Any permit issued under this ordinance may be 
suspended or revoked by the Chief of Police for 
any of the following reasons: 



44 



a) Fraud or misrepresentation in the applica- 
tion of the permit; 

b) Fraud or misrepresentation in the course of 
soliciting; 

c) Conducting the business of soliciting con- 
trary to the conditions specified in this 
by-law. 

d) Conducting the business of soliciting in 
such manner as to violate any of the laws of 
regulations of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts or the Town of Chelmsford. 

6. Any person who violates any provision of this 
by-law shall be punished by a fine not ex- 
ceeding $200.00. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Edward S. Marshall, member of 
the By-law Committee moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the appointment of a multiple member Rules 
Committee consisting of the Moderator and one Town 
Meeting Representative from each precinct to be elected 
by the incumbent Town Meeting Representatives within 
each precinct, for the purpose of proposing rules of order 
for the orderly conduct of town meeting. The committee 
shall submit their proposal no later than the next October 
session of the Annual Town Meeting. 

Jane McKersie, Member of the By-law Committee ex- 
plained the article. The Finance Committee and the Board 
of Selectmen were in favor of the article. Robert Joyce ques- 
tioned the fact that an even amount of people are members, 
and moved to amend the article. He moved to add after 
the word precinct in the fifth sentence "a member of the 
By-law Committee to be appointed by them." A discussion 
took place. The Moderator appointed the Town Counsel 
at this time to take over the rest of the discussion and vote 
of the article. He felt that because he appointed this com- 
mittee that there was a conflict. Town Counsel James Har- 
rington acting as the Temporary Moderator, proceeded with 
the meeting. The Temporary Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion. Motion defeated. Robert Sexton mov- 
ed to amend the article by adding "the Moderator as a non- 
voting member." And "this committee will expire upon 
presentation of their recommendation to Town Meeting." 
More discussion took place. The Temporary Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote, motion defeated. He then asked if there 
was any need for further discussion. Robert Joyce moved 
the question. The Temporary Moderator asked for a voice 
vote. A unanimous or %'s vote is needed. The tellers came 
forward and conducted a hand count: Yes 93 No 15 %'s 
is 72, motion carried to stop debate. The Temporary 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article. Motion 
carried. 

Moderator Dennis McHugh returned to the Chair and 
the meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Thomas Moran proponent of 
the petitioned article moved to withdraw the article due 
to the passage of article 9. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE llTown Clerk Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws 
article VII Miscellaneous, Section 1 Dog Regulations 
Subsections 5 by increasing fees as follows: 

The fee for every kennel licenses shall be as follows: 

Forty Dollars ($40.00) for every kennel license 
for 4 dogs or less. 

Eighty Dollars ($80.00) for every kennel license 
for over 4 dogs but not over 10 dogs. 

One Hundred Fifty Dollars ($150.00) for every 
kennel license for over 10 dogs but not over 25 
dogs. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that these fees 
should have been increased when the actual individual dog 
licenses were increased at the past June Town Meeting from 
$5.00 to $10.00 per dog. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved that the town vote to transfer the sum of $5,000.00 
from the Insurance Sinking Fund, to General Government 
Expenses, Line item #2, for the purpose of insurance 
deductible reimbursement. 



The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. Mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to convey in accordance with MGL Chapter 30B, for con- 
sideration to be determined, all right, Title and interest, 
if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land located 
on Wightman Street, shown as Lot 14 on Assessors Map 
19, containing 5,300 square feet more or less and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 2866, page 71. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that under this 
law all propertly valued over $500.00 must go out for public 
bid. The above described property does exceed $500.00 
in value, and this will allow the Board of Selectmen to pro- 
cess the sale accordingly. The Finance Committee was in 
favor of the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved to adjourn the meeting 
until 7:30 p.m., Monday evening October 15, 1990, at the 
McCarthy Middle School Auditorium. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 11:05 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



45 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
October 15, 1990 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:42 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 129 Representative Town 
Meeting Members present. The Moderator announced this 
would be the last town meeting for Finance Member 
Donald Elias, and thanked Mr. Elias for his years of service. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Barry Balan moved to waive the 
reading of the article. Motion carried. John Coddaire, 
Chairman of the Code of Ethics Committee, explained the 
article. The Charter mandated that the Moderator appoint 
a seven member board to prepare a Code of Ethics for the 
Town of Chelmsford. The Committee held a public hear- 
ing on July 11, 1990, and recommends the article before 
the body. The State of Massachusetts already has a con- 
flict of interest law on the books. The purpose of this by- 
law is to be an awareness law. To educate elected and ap- 
pointed officials and all Town Employees of possible con- 
flicts that they may be unaware of. The Finance Commit- 
tee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen sup- 
port the article. 

Edward Hilliard moved to amend the article. Under Sec- 
tion C. Paragraph #2 to add the words "paid employment," 
in the 3rd sentence after the words "includes but is not 
limited to" so that the sentence reads as follows: "Substan- 
tial value includes but is not limited to paid employment, 
additional compensation, waived fees, ...etc." The Finance 
Committee could not make a recommendation at this time, 
they requested further discussion. Edward Hilliard ex- 
plained the purpose of his motion. A discussion followed. 
Andrew Slinish moved the question. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote on the motion, which carried. He then 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, it was 
defeated. More discussion took place. Edward Hilliard mov- 
ed to amend the article. Under Section C to add a 13th 
paragraph to read as follows: 

"13. Municipal employees shall not perform private du- 
ty details in uniform in any establishment that serves 
alcoholic beverages." He then explained the purpose for 
the amendment. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on 
the motion to amend. Motion defeated. Loretta Gelenian 
questioned the wording in Paragraph 4 and 5 , and moved 
to delete them in their entirety. John Coddaire, Chairman 
of the Ethics Committee, spoke against the motion to 
amend. Loretta Gelenian moved to withdraw the motion 
due to the fact that she wanted to reword the motion. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. Loretta 
Gelenian moved to amend Section C Paragraph #4 to in- 
sert the words "acting on Town business" after the words 
"Municipal Employees." And to amend Paragraph #5 in 
Section C the same way. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion defeated. James Doukszewicz moved to delete 
Section C Paragraph #2 in its entirety. Town Counsel ruled 
the motion out of order because Mr. Doukszewicz is not 
a Town Meeting Member, and only a member may make 
motions. David McLachlan, Code of Ethics member, ex- 
plained the purpose for this article. Steven Temple ques- 



tioned why the Town needed to have this by-law if it was 
already a state law? John Coddaire explained that the 
Charter required the Town to have its own separate Code 
of Ethics. Kathleen Hillman moved to delete Section C 
Paragraph #2 in its entirety. She said that she agreed with 
Jim Doukszewicz's concept. David McLachlan explained 
why the Board felt that this paragraph should not be 
deleted. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion de- 
feated. More discussion took place. Kay Roberts moved to 
Amend Section C Paragraph #4 & #5 as follows: 

"4. After the word Chelmsford, add "And with whom 
the municipal Employee has had or is likely to have official 
dealings." 

5. After the word Chelmsford, add the same as above." 

John Coddaire said that the Committee was in favor of 
the motion. The Finance Committee recommended the 
motion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried to amend. He then asked for a voice vote on the arti- 
cle as amended. This left the Chair in doubt, he asked for 
a show of hands, motion carried. The article reads as 
follows: 

Daniel W. Burke, Member of the Code of Ethics, moved 
that the town vote to amend the General By-laws by ad- 
ding Article XIII, Code of Ethics as follows: 

ARTICLE XIII CODE OF ETHICS 

A. WHO THE BY-LAW GOVERNS 

This By-Law governs all municipal employees. A 
municipal employee is a person performing ser- 
vies for or holding an office, position, employ- 
ment or membership in a municipal agency, 
whether by election, appointment, contract of 
hire or engagement, whether serving with or 
without compensation, on a full, regular, part- 
time, intermittent, or consulting basis, but ex- 
cluding (1) elected members of a Town Meeting 
and (2) members of a charter commission 
established under Article LXXXIX (89) of the 
Amendments to the Constitution. 

B. PURPOSE 

The purpose of this By-Law is to ensure that 
municipal employees' private financial interests 
and personal relationships do not conflict with 
their public obligation to act objectively and with 
integrity. This By-law is written to prevent 
municipal employees from becoming involved in 
a situation which could result in or give the ap- 
pearance of unethical or illegal behavior. This 
By-law restricts what municipal employees may 
do on the job, after hours and after leaving 
public service. 

It is essential for the continued well-being of the 
Town of Chelmsford that its citizens have full 
confidence in the integrity of its municipal 
employees. The Town of Chelmsford desires to 
promote such confidence by demanding the 
highest standards of ethical conduct for each 



46 



municipal employee. It is required that 
municipal employees conduct themselves in a way 
that their behavior, both in practice and ap- 
pearance, conform to the highest standards of 
ethical conduct. The Town of Chelmsford 
recognizes the Massachusetts Conflict of Interest 
Law (Chapter 268A of the General Laws) as the 
basis for setting the minimum standard of ethical 
conduct for all municipal employees. It is con- 
sidered an integral component of this By-law and 
should read in its entirety. 

C. WHAT THE BY-LAW PROHIBITS 

This By-law provides that municipal employees 
for the Town of Chelmsford will "pay their own 
way." Municipal employees must avoid conduct 
which creates the impression that they will act 
with bias. 

1. Municipal employees shall not engage in the 
most obvious kind of corruption: bribery. 
Massachusetts law imposes criminal penalties, 
not only on municipal employees who seek or 
receive payoffs or kickbacks, but also on 
anyone who bribes or attempts to bribe a 
public official for any action or inaction. 

2. Municipal employees shall not request, ac- 
cept or offer anything of "substantial value" 
from or to anyone with whom the 
municipal employee has had or is likely to 
have official dealings even if the motivation 
for the gift is to express gratitude for a job 
well done or to foster goodwill. The Town of 
Chelmsford deems "substantial value" to be 
$50.00 or more in any calendar year. 
Substantial value includes but is not limited 
to additional compensation, waived fees, 
sporting event tickets, golf outings, parties, 
meals, discounts, gift certificates, entertain- 
ment, and refreshments at testimonials, 
retirement functions and ground breaking 
and dedication ceremonies. Free or dis- 
counted services such as construction or ac- 
counting work are considered gifts. The pur- 
chase of property at less than full market 
value, from any entity having matters before 
any town Board or Agency is strictly pro- 
hibited. 

3. Municipal employees shall not solicit con- 
tributions, sell tickets or otherwise seek or ac- 
cept payment for a testimonial or retirement 
function, or any function having a similar 
purpose, held for themselves, for a member 
of their immediate family, or other employee, 
if the contributor is a person or entity doing 
business with the Town of Chelmsford and 
the admission price or payment exceeds the 
actual per-person cost of the food and 
beverages served at the function. Municipal 
employees shall not request or require any 
person or entity to sponsor or contribute to 
any groundbreaking ceremony, dedication 



ceremony or similar occasion. The Town of 
Chelmsford, if it deems the occasion ap- 
propriate, shall plan and pay for the 
ceremony. 

4. Municipal employees shall not accept reim- 
bursement for travel expenses from any per- 
son or entity having business with or wishing 
to do business with the Town of Chelmsford. 
And with whom the municipal Employee has 
had or is likely to have official dealings. 
Municipal employees shall not utilize private 
aircraft for travel, whether business or 
pleasure, this is owned, leased or rented by 
entities doing business with or wishing to do 
business with the Town of Chelmsford and 
with whom the municipal Employee has had 
or is likely to have official dealings. Travel 
expenses for municipal employees for 
municipal business shall be paid by the 
Town. 

5. Municipal employees shall not use the non- 
business facilities of entities having financial 
contracts with or wishing to have financial 
contracts with the Town of Chelmsford. And 
with whom the municipal Employee has had 
or is likely to have official dealings. This in- 
cludes but is not limited to, staying at vaca- 
tion spots, lodges, or condominiums. 

6. Municipal employees are prohibited from 
taking action on any "particular matter" as 
defined in Chaptre 268A of the General Laws 
which would affect their own financial in- 
terest or the financial interest of: 

a. their immediate family (themselves, their 
spouse, children, parents, brothers and 
sisters); 

b. their partner(s); 

c. a business organization in which they serve 
as an officer, director, trustee, partner, 
silent partner, or employee (including a 
non-profit organization); and 

d. any person or organization with whom 
they are negotiating or have any arrange- 
ment concerning future employment. 

An exception is available to appointed 
municipal employees who may act on a 
matter in which they, their family or 
business has a financial stake, providing 
that they receive written permission from 
their appointing official prior to taking 
the action. 

7. Municipal employees shall not participate in 
any way in the hiring, promotion, perfor- 
mance review or salary recommendation of 
any immediate family member. An exception 



47 



is available to appointed municipal em- 
ployees who may act on a budget affecting 
an immediate family member's financial in- 
terest provided that they receive written per- 
mission from their appointing official prior 
to taking the action. 

8. Municipal employees shall not use their posi- 
tion to benefit from municipal contracts and 
must avoid conduct which creates the public 
perception that municipal employees have an 
"inside track" on obtaining municipal con- 
tracts or jobs. 

9. Municipal employees shall not use or attempt 
to use their municipal position to obtain un- 
warranted privileges for themselves or anyone 
else. Municipal employees shall avoid conduct 
which creates the impression that they can be 
improperly influenced or that they will act 
with bias. Municipal employees are pro- 
hibited from misusing confidential informa- 
tion obtained on the job and from accepting 
outside employment which is inherently in- 
compatible with their public position. 

10. Municipal employees shall not act as agent 
or attorney for a private party before the 
Town. There are exceptions which are 
covered under Chapter 268A of the General 
Laws, Section 17. 

11. Former municipal employees shall not derive 
unfair advantage by misusing friendships 
formed or confidential information obtained 
while serving the Town. 

12. Municipal employees shall not use Town pro- 
perty or any kind, either directly or indi- 
rectly, for other than officially sanctioned ac- 
tivities, except to the extent that said pro- 
perty is available to the public. 

D. RESPONSIBILITIES OF APPOINTING 
AUTHORITY: 

Appointing authorities shall appoint only those 
persons who do not have vested interests in any 
matter coming before that persons' appointed 
body which would violate or give the appearance 
of violating the provisions of this By-Law. 

E. IMPLEMENTATION OF BY-LAW 

All municipal employees are required to be 
familiar with the standards of this By-Law. A 
procedure for the proper orientation of each in- 
dividual is hereby established: 

The Town Manager and the Superintendent of 
Schools shall jointly develop a program to an- 
nually inform and educate all municipal 
employees of the required standards of conduct. 
The Town Manager and the Superintendent of 
Schools shall develop a program to inform and 
educate all incoming municipal employees of said 



standards of conduct. They shall include in their 
program, as a minimum, a procedure that will 
produce for the Town's records a signed docu- 
ment from each municipal employee indicating 
that each individual has read this By-Law and is 
familiar with the requirements of Chapter 268A 
of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

The Town Manager shall place the State Ethics 
Commission publication entitled "A Practical 
Guide to the Conflict of Interest Law for 
Municipal Employees" conspicuously in the Town 
Manager's and Town Clerk's office and shall pro- 
vide copies for placement in all public buildings 
for the benefit of all municipal employees and 
the public. 

All citizens and municipal employees shall 
regularly be made aware that if they believe a 
violation of this By-Law has occurred or is occur- 
ring, they should call or visit the State Ethics 
Commission's enforcement staff, or they may 
speak with the Town Manager or the Superinten- 
dent of Schools. 

The Town Manager and the Superintendent of 
Schools shall report to the State Ethics Commis- 
sion any suspected violations of the State Conflict 
of Interest Law. The Town Manager and the 
Superintendent of Schools shall report annually 
to their Respective Boards the educational in- 
itiatives they have taken to comply with this By- 
Law. They shall also report the status of alleged 
violations brought to their attention which report 
shall only be statistical in nature. 

When a violation of this By-Law has occurred, 
administrative action as is warranted shall be 
taken by the appropriate authority. 

If any provisions of this By-Law shall be held to 
be invalid, the validity of the remainder of this 
By-Law shall not be affected thereby. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Barry Balan moved to waive the 
reading of the article. Motion carried. James McBride of 
the Conservation Commission explained the article. The 
Board of Selectmen wanted to hear further comments 
before making their recommendation. Attorney Joseph 
Shanahan representing Louise Harrington, addressed the 
Body. He explained that Mrs. Harrington owned a piece 
of property in the town since 1908, questioned the wor- 
ding of "within 50 feet." He said that this does not leave 
any appeal process within the Town boards. The only way 
an appeal can be made is thru the Superior Court System. 
Which can be a costly and lengthy process for both the 
public and Town to go through. He felt that a public hear- 
ing should be held and any decision be made from the 
hearing. Jeffrey Brem moved to amend Section 2 by replac- 
ing the words fifty feet with twenty-five feet, so it reads 
"Shall be prohibited within 25' of any bank. . . . He said that 
the Board of Appeals should be able to make a decision 
on the matter. The public shouldn't have to go through 
the Superior Court. The Finance Committee didn't recom- 



48 



mend the motion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion defeated. Further discussion took place. Joseph 
Shanahan questioned the legality of the fifty feet wording. 
Town Counsel, James Harrington said that the Attorney 
General would make the final decision once the by-law is 
submitted to him. Robert Joyce moved to amend the arti- 
cle by adding to the end the following paragraph: "If any 
provision of this amendment shall be determined to be in- 
valid, the validity of the remaining portion of the amend- 
ment shall not be affected thereby." The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote, motion carried. More discussion took place. 
Fran McDougall moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. He then 
asked for a voice vote on the article as amended, which 
left the Chair in doubt. He then asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

David J. McLachlan, Member of the Conservation Com- 
mission, moved that the Town vote to amend the General 
By-Laws Article XI General Wetlands By-Laws as follows: 

1. Deleting the first paragraph of Section 6 Order 
of Conditions in its entirety and insert in its 
place the following: 

Section 6: Order of Conditions 

If after said hearing, the Conservation Commis- 
sion determines that the land on which the pro- 
posed work is to be done is significant to the in- 
terests protected by this By-Law, it shall by writ- 
ten order, within 21 days or such further time as 
the Commission and applicant shall agree upon, 
impose such conditions reasonably necessary for 
the protection of interests described herein and 
all work shall be done in accordance therewith. 
The Conservation Commission may impose such 
conditions on any proposed removing, dredging, 
filling or altering as it deems necessary to protect 
and preserve the interests covered by this By-Law. 
Such Order of Conditions shall be in writing and 
may be subject to the same constraints as any 
such order issued by the Chelmsford Conservation 
Commission under the provisions of G.L. 131, 
Section 40, or successor statutes, and shall be 
issued within 21 days after the Public Hearing. 
Such Order of Conditions shall expire 3 years 
from the date of issuance. The Conservation 
Commission may extend an Order of Conditions 
for one or more periods of up to three years 
each. The request for an extension shall be made 
to the Conservation Commission in writing at 
least thirty (30) days prior to expiration of the 
Order of Conditions. The Commission may deny 
the request for an extension and require the fil- 
ing of a new Notice of Intent for the remaining 
work. No proposed work governed by an Order 
of Conditions shall be undertaken until all per- 
mits, approvals, and variances required by the 
local By-Law have been obtained and all ap- 
plicable appeal periods have expired. 

2. Under Section 1, Application, by adding the 
following sentences: 



Provided however that the construction of any 
building as defined herein on any lot having an 
area of 40,000 square feet or more, shall be pro- 
hibited within fifty (50) feet of any bank, fresh 
water wetland, beach, flat, marsh, meadow, bog, 
swamp, or lands bordering or on any estuary, 
creek, river, stream, or lake or any land under 
said waters. 

Construction of a building shall not include any 
reconstruction, alteration, extension of structural 
change to a building existing on October 15, 
1990. 

3. Under Section 16 Definitions by inserting after 
paragraph e) the following paragraph: 

f) The term building as used in this By-Law 
shall mean a structure enclosed within ex- 
terior walls or firewalls, built, erected, and 
framed or a combination of any materials, 
whether portable or fixed, having a roof, to 
form a structure for the shelter of persons, 
animals, or property. For the purpose of this 
definition, "roof shall include an awning or 
any similar covering, whether or not perma- 
nent in nature. 

4. Under Section 1 Applications by adding the 
following paragraph: 

The Commission shall be prohibited from issuing 
a permit for any parcel where at least eighty (80) 
percent of the lot area required by the Zoning 
By-Law Section 2600 Intensity of Use Schedule, 
Minimum Lot Requirements, is not contiguous 
land other than that under any water body or 
bog, swamp, wet meadow, marsh, or any other 
wetland as defined in MGL Chapter 131, Section 
40; 

If any provision of this amendment shall be 
determined to be invalid, the validity of the re- 
maining portion of the amendment shall not be 
affected thereby 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Barry Balan moved to waive the 
reading of the article. Motion carried, unanimously. Peti- 
tioner Richard DeFreitas explained why he felt that the 
present Board of Health Rules and Regulations for Residen- 
tial Refuse Collection Licensing and disposal should 
become a town by-law. According to the Attorney General's 
Office only zoning or general by-laws can be voted or 
amended by the Town Meeting process. In order for any 
citizen to change the present Board of Health Rules & 
Regulations they must become a by-law. Presently only the 
Board of Health can change their own rules. He asked for 
support of the article and requested the body not amend 
the article in any way. He wanted the article submitted ex- 
actly as the Board of Health accepted them at their 
meeting, and let the A.G. decide the legality of them. The 
Finance Committee did not have an opinion for or against 
the article. The Board of Selectmen wanted to hear fur- 



49 



ther input. Richard DeFreitas felt that the Board should't 
be allowed to make policy on non-health issues. He went 
thru the article and pointed out the sections that were in 
question. A discussion took place. Dennis Ready asked for 
Town Counsel's opinion on if the article passed which law 
take presidence for enforcement, the By-law or the Health 
Rules and Regulations? James Harrington, Town Counsel 
explained that according to Chapter III of the State Law, 
the Board of Health has the right to make their own rules 
and regulations, and enforce them. Confusion could oc- 
cur because conflicting statutes are established. Paul 
McCarthy, Board of Health Member, explained that the 
Board of Health can changed their rules and regulations 
immediately at any time, at any monthly meeting. Time 
would be lost if the Board had to go thru the Town Meeting 
process of posting a warrant, and waiting for the Attorney 
General's approval. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the article, which left the chair in doubt. He asked for 
a show of hands. The article was defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Barry Balan, Chairman of the 
Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
the sum of $550,000.00 from Sewer betterments, special 
revenue, to reduce the exempt portions of debt and interest. 

Barry Balan explained the article. The Sewer Commis- 
sion's intent is to apply this money to the betterments to 
offset indebtedness caused from the cost of sewer construc- 
tion. The Finance Committee supports the article. It 
reduces the tax rate and uses the funds for the purpose of 
which they were intended. Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, 
cited the different opinions. That over the past ten years 
the Town Budget has been paying for the operation of the 
sewer commission, which promised to be self-supporting. 
An estimation of two million has been spent. The Com- 
mission should pay it back by applying it to the budget. 
If the CLT question passes in November then further 
budgetary cuts will have to be made it would seem that 
the money now available should be applied to the opera- 
tion of the Town. It should be used strictly for the con- 
tinuation of the sewer program. State and Federal funds 
are driving up. The money could be used to area's that 
needed to be done. Finally the money belongs to the tax- 
payers and should be returned to the taxpayer. He felt that 
the most rational decision at this time would be to wait 
until after the CLT question is voted, then apply the funds 
if need be towards the budget. Dennis Ready spoke in favor 
of Bernard Lynch's request. Town Treasurer James 
Doukszewicz reminded the Town Meeting Representatives 
that this is a townwide issue. Additional monies will be 
available at the end of the third quarterly tax payment. 
Those people who decided to spread the cost of tying into 
the sewage over the period of time alloted, will be due to 
make a payment along with their real estate taxes. This 
money could be added to the $550,000.00, already on 
hand. The Body may want to table or defeat the article 
if they are not comfortable with making a decision at this 
time. If the CLT question passes, then either further cuts 
will be made or an override question may be put on the 
ballot. In which case it may be better come February to 
have more monies to apply if need be to the operating 
budget. Sam Poulten felt it would be best to wait. Jeff Brem 
urged the Body to talk to their constitutents about which 
way the money should be spent. Barry Balan moved to 



withdraw the article. He wanted to remind the Body that 
the Commission wanted the funds used on behalf of the 
sewer project, either to offset the cost or applied toward 
the ongoing project. Ann Graham felt that the monies 
should be voted on tonight and applied to the sewer pro- 
ject. She felt it would be best to apply the money towards 
the betterment debt as was originally intended. Dennis 
Ready supported the motion to withdraw. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to withdraw, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Edward S. Marshall moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-laws as follows: 

1. Under Article V Streets and Sidewalks 

substitute "Director of Public Works" for "High- 
way Superintendent" in all sections of Article V. 

2. Under Article VII Miscellaneous Section 1 
Regulations of Dogs Subsection 6 Dog Officer 

by deleting the first paragraph and substituting 
the following: 

"The Town Manager shall annually appoint a 
Dog Officer and as many Assistant Dog Officers 
as he determines necessary to enforce this By-law 
and, said individual(s) shall enforce this By-law 
and perform such other duties as the Town Man- 
ager may determine. The Town Manager shall 
determine hours and conditions of work for the 
Dog Officers. Compensation for persons ap- 
pointed under this By-law shall be consistent with 
other By-laws dealing with salaries of appointed 
officials. 

3. Under Article VII Miscellaneous Section 1 
Regulations of Dogs Subsection 19 Dog Fund 

delete "Town Accountant" and substitute 
"Treasurer-Collector" in all applicable places. 

4. Under Article VII Miscellaneous Section 2 Tree 
Planting delete "Tree Warden" and substitute 
"Director of Public Works." 

Thomas Doyle Chairman of the By-law Committee ex- 
plained that this article and the next two are the results 
of by-laws that were mandated to be changed due to the 
adoption of the Charter. This particular article is a result 
of going thru the Charter and applying the technical 
changes required to the present by-laws in order to make 
them comply with the Charter. The Finance Committee 
supported the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
to waive the reading of the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. Thomas Doyle explained that these changes 
are mandated due to the adoption of the Charter. He would 
be glad to answer any and all questions at the appropriate 
sections. The Finance Committee was in favor of the arti- 
cle in general, but moved to amend under number 3. Sec- 
tion 1 Annual Budget Process the word(s) sixty (60) days 
to be ninety (90) days. He felt that more time was needed 
by the Finance Committee for review the individual 



50 



budgets. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried, unanimously to amend. Jeffrey Stallard moved to 
amend by adding number 1. Section 2.2 Publication, The 
warrant articles for any Special Town Meeting shall be 
made available to the Town Meeting Members not less than 
14 days before the Special Town Meeting. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. Dennis J. Ready moved to amend 
number 1. Section 3 Time of Meetings by inserting the 
word "annual" after "the Representative" and before "Town 
Meetings." He explained that this would further clarify the 
Charter and present by-law that the April and October 
meetings held on the dates mentioned in the by-law are 
both considered Annual Meetings. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote, motion carried. Under number 3. Sec- 
tion 2 Fees — Town Clerk and Treasurer a discussion took 
place Robert Joyce requested an explanation on the in- 
creases. Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that 
would bring the Town up to the same rates that the sur- 
rounding cities and towns are currently charging for their 
services. A majority of the rates haven't been raised in ten 
years. He estimated that it would bring in an additional 
$7,000.00 in revenues. Robert Joyce moved to delete the 
column marked "effective 12/1/90" in its entirety. He felt 
that this should have been a separate article. The Charter 
doesn't require these changes. Only those before and after 
this section within the article are mandated. The Finance 
Committee was not in favor of the motion to delete. Frances 
McDougall spoke in favor of the motion. She felt that it 
wasn't that much of an increase, and people should pay 
the fee when requiring certain services. David McLachlan 
felt that these are reasonable fees, and urged for the mo- 
tion to be defeated. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion defeated. Jeffrey Stallard moved to amend number 
3. Section 1 Annual Budget Process. After hearing the 
proposed amendment, Town Counel James Harrington 
ruled it out of order, because it does not comply with the 
Charter. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the en- 
tire article as amended, motion carried. The article reads 
as follows: 



weeks before either Town Meeting. The warrant 
articles for any Special Town Meeting shall be 
made available to the town meeting members not 
less than fourteen (14) days before the special 
town meeting. 

SECTION 3 TIME OF MEETINGS -The Representa- 
tive Annual Town Meetings shall be held on the last Mon- 
day in April and on the third (3rd) Monday October in 
each year. The April Town Meeting is expected to be 
primarily concerned with the determination of matters in- 
volving the expenditure and commitment of Town funds, 
including but not limited to the adoption of an annual 
operating budget for all Town agencies. 

The Board of Selectmen may, in any manner provided 
under the laws of the Commonwealth of the Charter, for 
the purpose of acting upon the legislative business of the 
Town in an orderly and expeditious manner, call the 
Representative Town Meeting into session at other times 
by the issuance of warrants therefore. 

ARTICLE 4 PROCEDURES - 

4.1 ORDER OF PRECEDENCE OF MOTIONS -At 
all sessions of Town Meeting, the following mo- 
tions shall be recognized and shall have 
precedence in the order in which they are ar- 
ranged in this section: 



1. Under Article II Town Meeting delete sections 1-6 
inclusive in their entirety and substitute the 
following: 

SECTION 1 ANNUAL ELECTION -The Annual Elec- 
tion shall be on the first Tuesday of April. 

SECTION 2 WARRANT ARTICLES - 

2.1 SUBMISSION DEADLINE-A11 warrant articles 
shall be in the hands of the Board of Selectmen 
no later than 1) the first (1st) Monday in January 
for the Town Meeting to be held in April, and b) 
the first (1st) Monday in August for the Town 
Meeting to be held in October. The Board of 
Selectmen may waive this requirement if deemed 
in the best interest of the Town or as required by 
statute. 



2.2 PUBLICATIONS -The warrant article shall be 
included in the Finance Committee report which 
shall be made available to Town Meeting 
Members and the public not less than two (2) 



51 



ORDER OF PRECEDENCE OF MOTIONS 



Privileged Debatable 



Can be Can be Vote 

Amended Reconsidered Required 



a) 


Adjourn (unqualified) 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


Majority 


b) 


Adjourn at or to a Certain Time 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Majority 


c) 


Recess 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


No 


Majority 


d) 


Question of Privilege, Order of Information 


Yes* 


No 


No 


No 


None 


e) 


Take out of Order 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


No 


Majority 





Reconsider 


Yes* 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Majority 


g) 


Lay on or Take from the Table 


No 


No 


No 


No 


Majority 


h) 


Previous Question 


No 


No 


No 


No 


2/3 


i) 


Limit or Extend Debate 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


2/3 


J) 


Postpone to a Certain Time 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Majority 


k) 


Commit, Recommit or Refer 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Majority 


1) 


Amend 


No 


Yes 


Once 


Yes 


Majority 


m) 


Main Motion 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Majority 



*Note: the privileged motions marked by an asterik may interrupt the speaker. 



The above table of motions in order of their precedence 
shall be printed on the inside of the front cover of the 
Finance Committee report for each of the annual Town 
Meetings. 

The following listing of common motions, classified ac- 
cording to their objectives, shall be printed on the inside 
of the back cover of the Finance Committee report for the 
annual Town Meetings. 

COMMON MOTIONS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING 
TO THEIR OBJECTIVES 



To Modify or Amend (a) 

(b) 

To Defer Action (a) 

(b) 
(c) 

To Suppress or Limit 

Debate (a) 



(b) 
To Suppress the Question (a) 

(b) 
To Consider a Question a (a) 
Second Time (b) 



Amend 

Commit or Refer 
Postpone to a certain time 
Lay on the Table 
Commmit or Refer 

Previous Question (to close debate 

now) (% vote) 

Limit Debate (% vote) 

Previous Question (% vote) and 

Reject Question 

Lay on the table 

Take from the Table 

Reconsider 



4.2 RECONSIDERATION -A motion at any ad- 
journed Town Meeting for reconsideration or 
rescinding of any action taken at a previous ses- 
sion of the adjourned Town Meeting shall not be 
entertained or allowed by the Town Moderator. 

4.3 AMENDMENTS— Any article appearing in the 
warrant and considered at any Town Meeting 
may be amended and any portion thereof may be 
deleted or added to by a vote of the Town 
Meeting Members provided, however, that in said 
notice the words "or act in relation thereto" or 
"do anything pertaining thereto" or words of 
similar import appears at the end of said article. 



An amended amendment cannot be amended 
and no motion or proposition of a subject dif- 
ferent from that under consideration shall be 
entertained under color of an amendment. 

4.4 AMENDMENT OF BY-LAWS -Town By-Laws 
may be amended or rescinded by a majority vote 
of those present and voting at any Town Meeting 
provided that the proposed action was published 
in the warrant of that Town Meeting and further, 
provided that any such amendment is in com- 
pliance with the Charter. 

4.5 REPORTS— When the report of a committee is 
placed in the hands of the Town Moderator, it 
shall be deemed to be received a vote to accept 
the report shall discharge the committee unless 
the report is one of progress and not final; in 
which case the committee continues to serve 
unless the Town Meeting Members vote to dis- 
charge same. 

All reports, resolutions, motions or amendments 
submitted to the Town Meeting for consideration 
involving the expenditure of money shall be 
presented in writing to the Town Moderator. 

4.6 APPROPRIATIONS — No money shall be trans- 
ferred at a Special Town Meeting except by a 
majority vote of those present and voting. 

All motions on articles involving bond or note 
issues shall require a two-thirds (%'s) vote of 
those present and voting. 

4.7 APPROPRIATIONS AT SPECIAL TOWN 
MEETINGS — No money shall be appropriated at 
a Special Town Meeting except by a two-thirds 
(%'s) vote of the voters present and voting. 

4.8 ATTORNEYS SPEAKING -Any person who is 
employed as an attorney by another interested in 



52 



any matter under discussion at a Town Meeting 
shall disclose the fact of his employment before 
speaking thereof. 

4.9 TOWN COUNSEL-The Board of Selectmen 
shall assure that the guidance of the Town 
Counsel be available both to the Town Moderator 
and to the body at all Town Meetings whenever 
practical. 

2. Under Article III Town Officers delete Sections 
1-8 inclusive in their entirety and substitute the 
following: 

SECTION 1 FINANCE COMMITTEE -The Town 
Moderator shall appoint a Finance Committee which shall 
be composed of seven (7) members; each of whom shall 
serve for a term of not more than three (3) years from the 
date of appointment. 

SECTION 2 PERSONNEL BOARD -There shall be a 
Personnel Board consisting of five (5) members, four (4) 
of whom shall be known as public members, and shall be 
appointed by the Town Manager. In the beginning, two 
(2) of these shall be appointed for a term of one (1) year 
and two (2) shall be appointed for a term of two (2) years. 
Thereafter, each public member shall be appointed for a 
term of two (2) years. Each term shall expire at the end 
of the appropriate fiscal year. 

The fifth (5th) member, to be known as the personnel 
member, shall be elected by Town employees who are sub- 
ject to the personnel system and whose name appears on 
the Town payroll list for the Wednesday prior to the elec- 
tion or who otherwise is identified as an eligible voter. Each 
voter must be eighteen (18) years of age or over on the day 
of the election. The term of office shall be for two (2) years 
and shall expire on July 1 of each odd numbered year. The 
election of the personnel member shall be secret and shall 
be supervised by a board of three (3) election officers ap- 
pointed by the Town Manager. The election shall be held 
in June to be effective in July. Special elections shall be held 
to fill the unexpired term of the personnel member who 
resigned before the term has expired. All elections shall 
be held between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on a week- 
day selected by the above mentioned board of three (3) elec- 
tion officers. Each permanent full time employee or part- 
time regular employee with a work schedule over twenty 
(20) or more hours per week will be granted one (1) vote. 
All other eligible voters will be granted one half (V6 ) vote 
each. 

At the first meeting of each fiscal year at which all Per- 
sonnel Board Members are present, a chairman of the Per- 
sonnel Board shall be elected by a majority vote. 

All members of the Personnel Board shall be registered 
voters of the Town of Chelmsford. 

No public member of the Personnel Board shall be an 
employee of the Town nor hold office whether appointed 
or elected. The personnel member of the Personnel Board 
shall not be an elected official or appointed department 



head but may otherwise be an employee who is subject to 
this By-Law. 

Members of the Personnel Board shall serve without 
compensation. 

The Personnel Board shall meet regularly as necessary 
to consider such business as may be presented by Town of- 
ficials, Town employees, or others. 

At any meeting of the Personnel Board, action by a ma- 
jority of those Board members shall be binding upon the 
Personnel Board. At least three (3) members of the Board 
shall be present in order to constitute a legal meeting. 

SECTION 3 TOWN TREASURER-COLLECTOR- 
The Collector of Taxes shall be the Town Collector. The 
Town Collector, within the time limits prescribed by law 
for the collection of accounts due the Town, shall collect 
all accounts due the Town, except those set forth in Sec- 
tion 38A of Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
as amended. The said Town Collector may settle and ad- 
just any such accounts upon such terms as he thinks for 
the best interests of the Town, or he may cause legal pro- 
ceedings to be commenced in his name as Town Collector 
for the collection of any such accounts and may employ 
counsel for that purpose. The costs of said legal pro- 
ceedings, including counsel fees, shall be charged to and 
paid by the Treasurer from the Collector's expense account. 
All bills for accounts due the Town shall state that all 
checks, drafts or money orders shall be made payable to 
or to the order of the Town of Chelmsford. 

SECTION 4 CONTRACTS BY TOWN OFFICERS - 
No officer or board of the Town shall make any contract 
on behalf of the Town in which such officer or any member 
of such board is directly or indirectly financially interested, 
except by competitive contracts. 

SECTION 5 AGENTS FOR SUITS -The Board of 
Selectmen are authorized to act as agents of the Town in 
any suit or suits which may arise with authority to settle 
and adjust claims or demands for or against the Town; and 
to employ counsel whenever in their judgment it is neces- 
sary. 

SECTION 6 REVOCATION OF APPOINTMENT- 

Whenever an appointment to an uncompensated Town of- 
fice is revoked, the appointing authority shall cause a writ- 
ten notice of that action, along with a statement of the 
specific reason or reasons therefor, to be sent within forty- 
eight (48) hours by registered mail to the affected individual 
at his last known address. 

This requirement shall apply to revocation only, and not 
to a decision against reappointment at the expiration of 
a fixed term. 

3. Under Article IV Financial Regulations delete 
Sections 1-4 inclusive in their entirety and substi- 
tute the following: 



53 



SECTION 1 ANNUAL BUDGET PROCESS -The Town 
Manager shall submit to the Finance Committee a pro- 
posed budget and capital improvement program for the 
ensuing fiscal year with an accompanying budget message 
and supporting documents as set forth in Section 6-2 of 
the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter at least ninety (90) days 
prior to the spring session of the annual Town Meeting. 

SECTION 2 FEES -TOWN CLERK AND TREA- 
SURER— All fees received by the Town Clerk and Town 
Treasurer by virtue of their office shall be paid into the 
Town Treasury. 





Prior to 


Effective 




12/1/90 


12/1/90 


(1) For filing and indexing assign- 






ment for the benefit of creditors 


$10.00 


$10.00 


(2) For entering amendment of a 






record of the birth of an illegiti- 






mate child subsequently 






legitimized 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(3) For correcting errors in a record 






of birth 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(4) For furnishing certificate of a 






birth 


$3.00 


$5.00 


(5) For furnishing an abstract copy of 






a record of birth 


$2.00 


$3.00 


(6) For entering delayed record of 






birth 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(7) For filing certificate of a person 






conducting business under any ti- 






tle other than his real name 


$10.00 


$20.00 


(8) For filing by a person conducting 






business under any title other 






than his real name, or statement 






of change of his residence, or of 






his discontinuance, retirement or 






withdrawal from or a change of 






location of such business 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(9) For furnishing certified copy of 






certificate of person conducting 






business under any title than his 






real name or a statment by such 






person of his discontinuance, 






retirement or withdrawal from 






such business 


$3.00 


$5.00 


(10) For recording the name and ad- 






dress, the date and number of the 






certificate issued to a person 






registered for the practice of 






podiatry in the Commonwealth 


$10.00 


$20.00 


(11) For correcting errors in a record 






of death 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(12) For furnishing a certificate of 






death 


$3.00 


$5.00 


(13) For furnishing an abstract copy of 






a record of death 


$2.00 


$3.00 


(14) For entering notice of intention of 






marriage and issuing certificates 






thereof 


$10.00 


$20.0 


(15) For entering certificate or mar- 






riage filed by persons married out 






of the Commonwealth 


$3.00 


$5.00 


(16) For issuing certificate of marriage 


$3.00 


$5.00 



(17) For furnishing an abstract copy of 






record of marriage 


$2.00 


$3.00 


(18) For correction errors in record of 






marriage 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(19) For recording power of attorney 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(20) For recording certificate of regis- 






tration granted to a person to 






engage in the practice of op- 






tometry, or issuing a certified copy 






thereof 


$10.00 


$20.00 


(21) For recording the name of the 






owner of a certificate of registra- 






tion as a physician or osteopath in 






the Commonwealth 


$10.00 


$20.00 


(22) For recording order granting loca- 






tions of poles, piers, abutments or 






conduits, alterations or transfers 






thereof and increase in the 






number of wires and cable or at- 






tachments under the provisions of 






Sec. 22 of Chap. 166 


$25.00 


$40.00 


Additional fee for each street or 






way included in such order 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(23) For examining records or papers 






relating to birth, marriage or 






deaths upon the application of 






any person, the actual expense 






thereof, but not less than $5.00 


Actual 


Expense 


(24) For copying any manuscript or 






record pertaining to a birth, mar- 






riage or death 


$3.00 


$5.00 per 
page 


(25) For receiving and filing of a com- 






plete inventory of all items to be 






included in a "closing out sale," 
etc. 

First page 






$2.00 


$10.00 


Each additional page 


$2.00 


$2.00 


(26) For filing a copy of written instru- 






ment or declaration of trust by 






the trustees of an association or 






trust, or any amendment thereof 






as provided by Sec. 2, Chap. 182 


$10.00 


$20.00 


(27) For recording deed of lot or plot 






in a public burial place or 






cemetery 


$5.00 


$10.00 


(28) Recording of any other document 






First page 


$5.00 


$10.00 


Each additional page 


$2.00 


$2.00 


(29) For license, registrations, or cer- 






tificates of the Fire Department 






issued pursuant to Gen. Law. 






Chap. 148 Sec. 13 






(a) Each new license appplication, 






etc. 


$50.00 


$50.00 


(b) Each renewal application, etc. 


$25.00 


$25.00 



SECTION 3 COLLECTIVE BARGAINING ITEMS - 
Any budget item presented at any annual or special Town 
Meeting for salaries or the payment of any benefit or ex- 
pense that is the subject of collective bargaining shall ac- 
curately reflect the most recently negotiated or agreed pay- 
ment and shall not be inflated to reflect anticipated 
negotiated contractual amounts. 



54 



SECTION 4 CAPITAL PLANNING COMMITTEE - 
A committee to be known as the Capital Planning Com- 
mittee shall be established and shall be composed of the 
following members: The Town Accountant (non-voting 
member), the Town Treasurer, one (1) member designated 
by the School Committee, one (1) member designated by 
the Finance Committee, one (1) member designated by the 
Board of Library Trustees, and two (2) citizens of the Town 
of Chelmsford to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen 
who are neither a municipal employee of the Town or an 
elected or appointed Town official except that they may 
be Town Meeting Members. The committee shall study pro- 
posed capital outlays having a useful life of at least one 
(1) year or the acquisition of land. The committee shall 
promulgate rules and regulations, make such investigations 
and hold public hearings as it deems appropriate. 

Sam Poulten questioned what would the impact be if 
the CLT vote passes. Town Counsel, James Harrington, ex- 
plained that a Special Town Meeting would have to be call- 
ed and further action would be taken. The Moderator an- 
nounced that absentee ballots are now available at the 
Town Clerk's Office for the November 6th election. See- 
ing that there was no further business at hand he declared 
the meeting adjourned. The Meeting adjourned at 10:35 
p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



1). To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political 
parties for the followikng offices: 

U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

LT GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REP. IN CONGRESS FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT 
COUNCILLOR THIRD COUNCILLOR 

DISTRICT 
SENATOR IN GENERAL 
COURT FIFTH MDSX. SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT 
REP. IN GENERAL COURT SIXTEENTH MDSX. REP. 

DISTRICT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY NORTHERN DISTRICT 

REGISTER OF PROBATE MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

COUNTY TREASURER MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER . . . .MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

2.) To vote on the following questions: 

QUESTION 1 

Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 
Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to 
the constitution summarized below, which was approved 
by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Rep- 
resentatives and the Senate on December 17, 1987 by a vote 
of 180 to 6, and on June 11, 1990 by a vote of 186 to 6? 



TOWN WARRANT FOR STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 6, 1990 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 



SUMMARY 
The proposed constitutional amendment would repeal 
the constitutional provision that state census be taken and 
used as the basis for determining state representative, 
senatorial and councillor districts. The proposed constitu- 
tional amendment would provide that the federal census 
shall be the basis for determining such districts. 



Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Election to vote at: 

Precinct 1. Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 
Precinct 2. Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson Road 
Precinct 3. Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson Road 
Precinct 4. Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 
Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium, 25 Maple Road 
Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 
Precinct 7. McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium, 

250 North Road 
Precinct 8. McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

250 North Road 
Precinct 9. Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 

On Tuesday the sixth day of November, 1990, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 
p.m. for the following purposes: 



QUESTION 2 

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 
Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate or House of Representatives 
before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 
The proposed law would place restrictions on the State's 
use of consultants. It would place various limits on the 
amount of profit, overhead charges and expenses that the 
Senate could pay consultants. It would limit the duration 
of consultant contracts to two years and any extension to 
one year, and it would limit the degree to which such con- 
tracts could be changed to require payments in excess of 
the original contract. The proposed law would limit to 
$100,000 the amount the State could pay on a consultant 
contract with an individual and would require all other 
consultant contracts in excess of $25,000.00 to be sought 



55 



through competitive bidding. It would prohibit consultants 
from supervising State employees, and it would limit the 
use of consultants as substitutes for State employee 
positions. 

In addition, the proposed law would place limits on that 
total amount of money State agencies, departments and 
Authorities could spend on consultants each year. Sub- 
sidiary provisions would also establish a method for these 
entities to gradually come into compliance with the new 
spending limits and would give authority to the State 
Secretary of Administration and Finance, on request, to 
permit some spending in excess of the new limits. The pro- 
posed law would also require State agencies, departments 
and Authorities as well as the Secretary of Administration 
and Finance to submit yearly reports concerning the State's 
consultant contracts to certain legislative committees and 
to the Inspector General. 

Finally, the proposed law provides that any of its provi- 
sions, if found by a court to be unconstitutional or other- 
wise unlawful, would be severed from the law and the re- 
maining provisions would continue in effect. 



vision of the Massachusetts general laws relating to taxes 
shall be the same as it was on August 2, 1989, or the effec- 
tive date of the proposed law, whichever language yields 
less tax revenue. The tax provisions affected include sec- 
tions relating to the surtax on business income, corporate 
excise taxes, S corporation taxes, taxes on security corpora- 
tions, taxes on Part A income (in general, unearned in- 
come), bank taxes, excise taxes on alcoholic beverages and 
cigarettes, excise taxes on deeds, estate taxes, payments to 
the Commonwealth relating to horse and dog racing, pay- 
ment to the Commonwealth relating to boxing and sparr- 
ing matches, taxes on utility companies, gasoline taxes, 
taxes on insurance companies, excise taxes on motor 
vehicles, taxes on urban redevelopment corporations, sales 
tax, use tax, room occupancy excise tax, property taxes, 
and taxes on proceeds from raffles and bazaars. 

The proposed law also contains a provision that if any 
sections of the law are held to be invalid, all other sections 
of the law are to remain in effect. 



QUESTION 3 

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 
Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Represen- 
tatives before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state income tax 
rate, affect language contained in certain tax provisions, 
and regulate the setting of fees by state agencies and 
authorities. 

The proposed law would set the state income tax rate 
on Part B taxable income (in general, earned income) at 
4.25% for 1991 and 4.625% for 1992, except for income 
from unemployment compensation, alimony, Massachu- 
setts bank interest, rental income, pension and annuity in- 
come, and IRA/Keough deductions, which would be taxed 
at 5%. 

The proposed law also provides that the fee imposed by 
any state agency or authority shall be no more than the 
fee that was in effect on or before June 30, 1988. The state 
Secretary of Administration would determine the amount 
to be charged for any service registration, regulation, 
license, fee, permit or other public function, except for the 
rates of tuition or fees at state colleges and universities or 
any fees or charges relative to the administration and opera- 
tion of the state courts. Any increase or decrease in a fee, 
or the establishment of any new fee, would require the ap- 
proval of the Legislature. Any increase in a fee would not 
apply to persons 65 years of age or older. No state agency 
or authority could collect any fee which exceeds the ad- 
ministrative costs directly incurred by the state agency or 
authority to produce and process the application for any 
license or permit. The Secretary of Administration must 
report information concerning fees to the Legislature on 
an annual basis. 

The proposed law provides that for tax periods commen- 
cing on or after January 1, 1991, language in certain pro- 



QUESTION 4 

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 
Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate or House of Representa- 
tives before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state election laws 
governing the establishment of political parties and the 
nomination of candidates. 

The proposed law would allow voters to register under 
a political designation other than "independent" and in 
addition to the two political parties previously recognized 
by law (Republican or Democrat), if at least fifty voters 
request to be permitted to do so. It would allow any group 
to qualify as a political party under Massachusetts law if 
at least one percent of the total number of registered voters 
register to vote using that group's political designation, or 
if at least three percent of the votes cast at the preceding 
election for any statewide office were cast for a candidate 
running under that group's political designation. 

The proposed law would set the minimum number of 
signatures needed on independent or minor part nomina- 
tion papers for state office at one -half of one percent ( V& %) 
of the entire vote cast in the previous state election for 
governor (as compared to 2% as of 1989), and would also 
establish this number of signatures as the upper limit need- 
ed for major party candidates. The proposed law would 
also permit voters to sign the nomination papers of any 
number of candidates for the same office, would require 
that all blank forms to be used for nomination papers and 
initiative and referendum petitions be no more than 8 !/£ " 
by 14 " in size, and would allow signatures to be collected 
on exact copies of these forms. 



56 



QUESTION 5 

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 
Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Represen- 
tatives before May 2, 1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would regulate the distribution to 
cities and towns of the Local Aid Fund, which consists of 
at least 40 % of the revenue generated by the state income, 
sales and corporate taxes, as well as the balance of the State 
Lottery Fund. 

Subject to appropriation by the Legislature, the State 
Treasurer would distribute the Local Aid Fund to cities and 
towns on a quarterly basis, and each city or town would 
receive at least the same amount of local aid it received 
in the previous fiscal year unless the total Local Aid Fund 
decreases. In fiscal year 1992, if there has been any increase 
over the fiscal year 1989 fund, half of the increase would 
be distributed in accordance with the distribution formula 
used for fiscal year 1989, and half would be distributed 
to each city and town in proportion to its population. 

In each year after 1992, if the fund increase, the excess 
would be distributed through a formula devised by the state 
Secretary of Administration and Finance, with the advice 
and consent of the Local Government Advisory Commit- 
tee. If the fund decreases after 1992, each town or city will 
have the amount it receives decreased by the same 
percentage. 

This proposed law also requires that the Treasurer 
publish an annual report about the Local Aid Fund, that 
the state Auditor publish an annual audit of the Account, 
and that the Secretary of Administration and Finance issue 
to each city and town an estimate of funds it will receive 
from the Local Aid Fund. 

Each city or town would be allowed to bring a lawsuit 
to force distribution of the account, and would be entitl- 
ed to a late payment fee if distribution is not timely. 



The Probate Court/ Registry of Deed building 
and land in Cambridge, Massachusetts occupied 
by the judicial branch and owned by the county? 



Hereof fail not and make return of the warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said election. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of October, A.D. 
1990. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
OF TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Bonita A. Towle, Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Roger A. Blomgren 



QUESTION 6 

THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall radio and television broadcast outlets be required 
to give free and equal time to all certified candidates for 
public office in the Commonwealth? 



YES 
NO 



QUESTION 7 

Middlesex County Land Transfers 
Shall Middlesex County elect to transfer to the Com- 
monwealth all right, title and interest held by said County 
in: 

A. The Superior Court House building and land in 
Lowell, Massachussetts 

B. The Superior Court House building and land in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 



57 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD— STATE ELECTION— NOVEMBER 6, 1990 

OFFICES & CANDIDATES 

Pctl Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Totals % 
SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Blanks 44 55 52 63 43 67 53 38 40 455 2.9% 

John F. Kerry 831 895 786 765 853 810 900 815 793 7,448 46.9% 

Jim Rappaport 778 898 813 795 1,027 888 971 801 920 7,891 49.7% 

0.0% 

Write-in 4 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 2 18 0.1% 

Misc* 7 9 5 6 5 7 7 5 10 61 0.4% 



TOTAL 


1,664 


1,858 


1,657 


1,634 


1,930 


1,773 


1,932 


1,660 


1,765 


15,873 




GOVERNOR & LT GOVERNOR 
























Blanks 


26 


24 


21 


32 


28 


23 


29 


21 


26 


230 


1.4% 


Silber & Clapprffod 


668 


725 


669 


689 


670 


720 


703 


678 


680 


6,202 


39.1% 


Weld & Cellucci 


919 


1,075 


926 


874 


1,162 


984 


1,157 


916 


999 


9,012 


56.8% 


Umina & DeBerry 


48 


30 


36 


34 


64 


41 


32 


40 


51 


376 


2.4% 


Dorothy Stevens, W/In 








1 














1 





2 


0.0% 


Write-In 


2 


3 


3 


3 


1 





9 


1 


6 


28 


0.2% 


Misc* 


1 


1 


1 


2 


5 


5 


2 


3 


3 


23 


0.1% 



70 


76 


70 


75 


58 


78 


78 


40 


66 


611 


3.8% 


949 


1,023 


947 


959 


1,051 


1,015 


1,039 


944 


949 


8,876 


55.9% 


643 


753 


638 


599 


815 


676 


808 


675 


745 


6,352 


40.0% 
































0.0% 











1 


6 


1 


2 


1 





11 


0.1% 


2 


6 


2 








3 


5 





5 


23 


0.1% 



TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Blanks 

L. Scott Harshbarger 

William C. Sawyer 

Write-In 
Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Blanks 113 156 98 116 132 126 145 114 119 1,119 7.0% 

Michael J. Connolly 550 600 543 610 583 589 554 541 537 5,107 32.2% 

Paul McCarthy 749 838 794 698 905 823 955 758 837 7,357 46.3% 

Barbara F. Ahern 248 260 222 208 307 233 277 246 265 2,266 14.3% 

0.0% 

Write-in 110 2 110 10 7 0.0% 

Misc* 3 3 2 1 1 7 17 0.1% 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

TREASURER 

Blanks 

William Francis Galvin 
Joseph D. Malone 
C. David Nash 

Write-In 
Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

AUDITOR 

Blanks 

A. Joseph DeNucci 
Douglas J. Murray 
Steven K. Sherman 

Write-In 
Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 



70 


84 


79 


71 


85 


82 


97 


75 


74 


717 


4.5% 


453 


535 


431 


473 


470 


434 


418 


471 


467 


4,152 


26.2% 


1,038 


1,138 


1,044 


1,004 


1,251 


1,163 


1,296 


1,019 


1,130 


10,083 


63.5% 


98 


99 


102 


85 


123 


93 


120 


93 


91 


904 


5.7% 
































0.0% 


3 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 








8 


0.1% 


2 


2 

















2 


3 


9 


0.1% 



133 


170 


134 


131 


148 


143 


168 


130 


147 


1,304 


8.2% 


660 


749 


675 


709 


731 


716 


734 


668 


645 


6,287 


39.6% 


712 


787 


710 


661 


879 


793 


864 


707 


809 


6,922 


43.6% 


152 


147 


137 


131 


169 


119 


163 


152 


160 


1,330 


8.4% 
































0.0% 











1 





1 








1 


3 


0.0% 


7 


5 


1 


1 


3 


1 


3 


3 


3 


27 


0.2% 



53 


71 


55 


58 


54 


55 


70 


46 


64 


526 


3.3% 


772 


805 


760 


722 


850 


801 


863 


762 


768 


7,103 


44.7% 


835 


976 


841 


852 


1,023 


912 


993 


848 


929 


8,209 


51.7% 
































0.0% 











1 





2 


1 








4 


0.0% 


4 


6 


1 


1 


3 


3 


5 


4 


4 


31 


0.2% 



58 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Totals 
REP. IN CONGRESS 

Blanks 

Chester G. Atkins 

John F. MacGovern 

Write-in 

Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

COUNCILLOR 

Blanks 

Robert B. Kennedy 

Thomas F. Healy 

Write- In 
Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

SENATOR IN GENERAL CT 

Blanks 111 161 117 114 117 124 146 120 119 1,129 7.1% 

Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 1,027 1,086 1,073 954 1,261 1,137 1,265 976 1,168 9,947 62.7% 

Bryan P. McCarthy 

Write-In 
Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT 

Blanks 

Carol C. Cleven 

Write-In 
Misc* 



162 


190 


163 


138 


183 


174 


221 


152 


163 


1,546 


9.7% 


650 


761 


602 


745 


668 


664 


663 


662 


603 


6,018 


37.9% 


849 


903 


890 


750 


1,071 


930 


1,044 


843 


995 


8,275 


52.1% 
































0.0% 








1 


1 





2 





1 





5 


0.0% 


3 


4 


1 





8 


3 


4 


2 


4 


29 


0.2% 



520 


605 


464 


563 


549 


510 


509 


561 


471 


4,752 


29.9% 
































0.0% 





3 





1 





1 


3 








8 


0.1% 


6 


3 


3 


2 


3 


1 


9 


3 


7 


37 


0.2% 



308 


338 


253 


287 


327 


290 


326 


292 


289 


2,710 


17.1% 


1,316 


1,486 


1,368 


1,320 


1,572 


1,448 


1,573 


1,336 


1,440 


12,859 


81.0% 
































0.0% 


7 


5 


10 


7 


6 


6 


12 


5 


10 


68 


0.4% 


33 


29 


26 


20 


25 


29 


21 


27 


26 


236 


1.5% 



616 


662 


621 


536 


772 


688 


825 


662 


712 


6,094 


38.4% 


1,008 


1,142 


985 


1,065 


1,103 


1,050 


1,058 


970 


997 


9,378 


59.1% 
































0.0% 


8 


2 


13 


12 


5 


8 


3 


1 


2 


54 


0.3% 


32 


52 


38 


21 


50 


27 


46 


27 


54 


347 


2.2% 



TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Blanks 

Thomas F. Reilly 

Write-in 
Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 

Blanks 

Donna M. Lambert 

Thomas J. Larkin 

Write -In 
Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 

COUNTY TREASURER 

Blanks 263 344 296 252 326 298 382 277 301 2,739 17.3% 

James E. Fahey, Jr. 550 603 501 597 584 560 530 533 510 4,968 31.3% 

Walter Fish 837 897 853 781 1,009 910 1,012 843 945 8,087 50.9% 

0.0% 

Write-In 10 10 13 0.0% 

Misc* 14 14 7 3 11 4 8 7 8 76 0.5% 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 




668 


729 


693 


601 


815 


753 


913 


715 


757 


6,644 


41.9% 


948 


1,067 


918 


1,003 


1,056 


981 


969 


915 


951 


8,808 


55.5% 
































0.0% 





4 


10 


13 


7 


10 


5 


4 


3 


56 


0.4% 


48 


58 


36 


17 


52 


29 


45 


26 


54 


365 


2.3% 



75 


87 


37 


103 


66 


88 


57 


61 


59 


633 


4.0% 


1,324 


1,477 


1,404 


1,267 


1,586 


1,449 


1,626 


1,361 


1,476 


12,970 


81.7% 


265 


294 


216 


264 


278 


236 


249 


238 


230 


2,270 


14.3% 



59 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Totals 
COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Blanks 

Francis X. Flaherty 

Write-In 

Misc* 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

QUESTION 1 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 1,664 1,858 1,657 1,634 1,930 1,773 1,932 1,660 1,765 15,873 

QUESTION 2 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 3 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 4 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 5 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 6 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 7 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

TOTAL 



52 


50 


28 


66 


48 


57 


44 


33 


33 


411 


2.6% 


843 


935 


806 


813 


983 


887 


929 


840 


967 


8,003 


50.4% 


769 


873 
1,858 


823 


755 
1,634 


899 


829 
1,773 


959 
1,932 


787 
1,660 


765 
1,765 


7,459 
15,873 


47.0% 


1,664 


1,657 


1,930 




29 


29 


16 


39 


26 


24 


19 


14 


12 


208 


1.3% 


726 


884 


714 


746 


921 


799 


886 


775 


850 


7,301 


46.0% 


909 


945 

1,858 


927 
1,657 


849 


983 


950 

1,773 


1,027 
1,932 


871 
1,660 


903 
1,765 


8,364 
15,873 


52.7% 


1,664 


1,634 


1,930 




89 


113 


63 


116 


87 


107 


85 


82 


88 


830 


5.2% 


896 


970 


849 


853 


1.060 


911 


1,031 


895 


1,011 


8,476 


53.4% 


679 


775 
1,858 


745 
1,657 


665 
1,634 


783 
1,930 


755 
1,773 


816 
1,932 


683 


666 
1,765 


6,567 
15,873 


41.4% 


1,664 


1,660 




99 


120 


80 


112 


100 


116 


96 


83 


81 


887 


5.6% 


1,044 


1,161 


1,033 


1,038 


1,224 


1,161 


1,259 


1,049 


1,128 


10,097 


63.6% 


521 


577 
1,858 


544 
1,657 


484 


606 
1,930 


496 
1,773 


577 
1,932 


528 
1,660 


556 
1,765 


4,889 
15,873 


30.8% 


1,664 


1,634 




89 


141 


74 


117 


95 


121 


107 


96 


98 


938 


5.9% 


872 


919 


860 


806 


969 


874 


955 


850 


937 


8,042 


50.7% 


703 


798 

1,858 


723 

1,657 


711 
1,634 


866 


778 
1,773 


870 
1,932 


714 
1,660 


730 
1,765 


6,893 
15,873 


43.4% 


1,664 


1,930 




257 


368 


250 


268 


338 


308 


355 


259 


297 


2,700 


17.0% 


728 


711 


758 


706 


824 


798 


830 


691 


719 


6,765 


42.6% 


679 


779 


649 


660 


768 


667 


747 


710 


749 


6,408 


40.4% 


1,664 


1,858 


1,657 


1,634 


1,930 


1,773 


1,932 


1,660 


1,765 


15,873 





60 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 3, 1990 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
p.m. at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 125 Representative Town 
Meeting Members present. 

The Moderator pointed out the fire exits located within 
the hall. He went over the Town Meeting procedures. 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman 
Towle then moved that the reading of the entire warrant 
be waived. Cheryl Warshafsky asked for clarification on the 
purpose of the meeting. Town Manager Bernard Lynch ex- 
plained that it was called in order to act upon the rent con- 
trol article appearing under article one. He further ex- 
plained that the body had to ratify the action taken at the 
October 1st and 15th meeting, which appears under arti- 
cle 3. According to Bond Counsel, the warrant must be 
posted 14 days prior to the date of the fall meeting, as re- 
quired by State statute. The Town's by-law and Charter 
allowed for two annual meetings to be held in one year. 
One in the spring and the second in the fall, which would 
require only posting 7 days prior to the meeting. A discus- 
sion took place. Cheryl Warshafsky asked if each article 
would be brought back for a vote. Town Counsel, James 
Harrington, explained that only one vote is required to 
ratify the action which took place on all the articles. No 
article will be voted on individually. Sam Poulten ques- 
tioned the warrant, he felt that the Town Meeting Repre- 
sentatives should have enough notice for any opportunity 
to submit articles for any Special Town Meeting Warrant. 
The Moderator proceeded with the meeting. He asked for 
the vote on the waiving of the reading of the entire war- 
rant. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator made a few announcements. He re- 
quested a moment of silence in respect for James McKeown, 
a former member of the Sewer Commission, who passed 
away on November 29th. He mentioned that tonight would 
be Finance Commimttee member, Bill Logan's last 
meeting, and thanked Mr. Logan for all his work. He then 
announced that Edward Marshall and Ann Graham were 
appointed to the Finance Committee and welcomed them. 
The Town Meeting members acknowledged the Finance 
Committee's news with a round of applause. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Susan Gates, Chairman of the 
Rent Control Board, moved that the Town vote to amend 
Article XII Mobile Home Park Rent Control By-law of 

the General By-laws by adding the following paragraph to 
Section 6 as follows: 

5.) The Board shall have the power to approve any 
lease entered into by the Owner of any Mobile 
Home Park and tenants of the Park provided said 
lease is approved by the Owner and a majority of 
the tenants in the Park and the Board finds that 
said Owner and tenants have been represented by 



counsel in the lease negotiations, or said lease is 
approved by the Superior Court of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

Susan Gates explained that this was a housekeeping 
measure. The Board is allowed to amend their own by-laws 
when they want to. In order to avoid any conflict the Board 
is requesting that the Town's by-laws be amended in order 
to say the same thing. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. Wayne 
Richardson, President of the Citizens for Action 
Chelmsford Mobile Home Park, spoke on behalf of the 
members of his organization. He thanked the different 
Boards and offices, that have helped him over the last nine 
years. He explained that the majority of the tenants who 
belong to this organization approve of the lease being of- 
fered by the owner. It will be a thirty year lease, beginning 
January 1, 1991 and binds the present owner and any subse- 
quent owner of the park and any present or future tenants. 
This lease will be approved by the Superior Court of Mass- 
achusetts. He asked for the support of the article. Linda 
Allen who is a homeowner in the park, said she was against 
the article. David McLachlan asked her to explain why she 
was against the article. She felt that a lease with present 
owner won't work. The rents will be increased and that the 
Rent Control Board won't have any say. Susan Gates ex- 
plained that this is not an approval of the lease, it only 
gives the Rent Control Board the power to approve leases. 
This particular lease which has been negotiated will not 
necessarily be approved by the board, it only gives the 
board the power and mechanism to approve it. A discus- 
sion took place. James Harrington, Town Counsel, explain- 
ed that there has been an ongoing litigation between the 
tenants, homeowners and the mobile park owners over the 
closing of the park. The owners want to close the park, 
the Attorney General's Office brought action against the 
owners. The action has been before the courts for a number 
of years. The Town was a party to the action, however, it 
was successful by motion of being released from the lawsuit, 
so the Town is no longer a party to the lawsuit. He ex- 
plained that all the other parties involved have reached an 
agreement that the rent control board accept the lease. The 
lease will then be submitted to the Superior Court in the 
form of an agreement for judgment. The Judge will either 
approve it or disapprove it. The Town Counsel says he 
recommends to the Town Body and the Rent Control Board 
that the Town is not responsible for the rates set by private 
parties, being the tenants and the park owners. If all those 
parties agreed by due process to resolve their differences 
then the town shouldn't stand in the way. John Emerson 
moved the question. The moderator attempted a voice vote 
which failed. The following tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken. Helen Manahan, Jean Horgan, 
Michael McCall and Dorothy Frawley. The result was: Yes 
106, No 4, %'s is 73, the motion carried to stop debate. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article. Mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to amend Article VI Section 21 
Unregistered Motor Vehicle By-Law of the General By- 
Law by deleting paragraph one and inserting in its place 
the following: 



61 



1.) Except as may be provided herein, not more than 
one unregistered motor vehicle shall be placed, 
stored, or kept on property except property used 
for business or industrial purposes. No unregis- 
tered motor vehicle shall be stored, placed or 
kept on a "paper street" or private way. All 
privately owned unregistered motor vehicles shall 
be stored, placed and kept on private property. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this arti- 
cle was submitted as per request of the Police Department, 
who worked with Town Counsel on the wording. The zon- 
ing by-law permits no more than two (2) unregistered motor 
vehicles or trailers stored on any property. This would allow 
one (1) car to be stored and require a permit at no charge, 
from the Board of Selectmen for the second car. The 
Finance Committee did not have any recommendation. 
William Spence spoke against the article. Due to the cur- 
rent economical status of a lot of the residents in this town 
at this time, cars may be taken off the road because of the 
high cost of insurance, etc. He agreed that the resident who 
has more than two cars stored on the property does abuse 
the law, but why should the resident who may do this as 
a temporary measure be penalized? He feels that this is not 
a necessary article at this time. James Sousa spoke about 
the article. He wanted to have the law not apply to any 
vehicles out of public view. If the vehicles are kept in a 
garage or behind a stockade fence then a permit shouldn't 
be required. He moved to amend the article by adding to 
the end "The provisions of this paragraph shall not apply 
to any motor vehicles stored out of public view." He ex- 
plained the purpose of his motion. Selectman Henrick 
Johnson explained that he was in favor of the article be- 
cause there could be a lot of cars stored or abandoned on 
property and he felt that there should be some prevention 
control. Ronald Wetmore questioned who would be respon- 
sible, the property owner or the owner of the motor vehi- 
cle? James Harrington explained that the owner of the pro- 
perty is responsible, but in the case of landlord and owner 
of a motor vehicle then both parties would be fined. Ronald 
Wetmore felt that this was wrong. It shouldn't be the land- 
lord's responsibility. A discussion took place. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend. Motion 
defeated. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the ar- 
ticle, which left the chair in doubt, he asked for a show 
hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Bonita Towle moved 
that the Town vote to approve and confirm the actions 
taken at the October 1, 1990 and October 15, 1990 sessions 
of the Fall 1990 Annual Town Meeting, the record of which 
is available for inspection at the office of the Town Clerk. 

Town Manager, Bernard Lynch, explained that due to 
a technical disagreement between the Town Counsel and 
Bond Counsel regarding the posting requirements of the 
October 1st warrant, Bond Counsel feels that all the ac- 
tion that took place at those two meetings must be rati- 
fied. The Finance Committee supported the article. Grace 
Dunn spoke against the article. She questioned the 
$200,000.00 transfer of insurance money, which was used 
to fund article 2. She felt it was surplus money from the 
employees' health insurance trust fund that was used, and 
wanted to know why the employees' health insurance pre- 



miums increased if there was a surplus. She felt the money 
shouldn't be used to fund anything else but the insurance 
premiums. Bernard Lynch explained that because of two 
deficits in FY 1987, and 1988 the funds were raised, that's 
why there was an excess, not a surplus. This is money 
recouped prior to the fiscal year deficits. Samuel Poulten 
questioned the wording of the warrant article vs. the mo- 
tion. He felt that individual article discussion should be 
allowed, not just discussion on the one way or the other 
vote needed to ratify action of the two meetings. He wanted 
to discuss the issue of the laying off of three policemen. 
Rose Sergi spoke against the layoffs and other issues. She 
spoke about areas where money could be saved in order 
to reinstate the policemen, and avoid layoffs. Bernard 
Lynch, Town Manager explained that there was no fun- 
ding available. He said that after reviewing the budget with 
the Police Chief and taking the steps necessary in order 
to try and not reduce the police force, it became unavoid- 
able and the layoffs must be done. A lengthy discussion 
took place. Roland Linstad explained the Police Union's 
request for an additional 575,000.00 when they appeared 
before the Board of Selectmen, asked that the ratification 
not be passed. More discussion took place. David 
McLachlan asked what was the particular article that the 
Bond Counsel would not approve. James Doukszewicz, 
Treasurer and Financial Director said it was article four. 
He explained that due to a difference in opinion with the 
posting requirements, Bond Counsel would not approve the 
action taken under this article. David McLachlan urged 
the Town Meeting Body to approve that article. Cheryl Boss 
asked if the Town Meeting Representatives could specify 
where money can be spent within a budget, or if all they 
can only do is to approve the amounts. Town Counsel James 
Harrington explained that all the representatives do is vote 
on the amounts given. They cannot control where or how 
the money will be spent, that decision is the Town 
Manager's. Richard DeFreitas spoke against not being able 
to discuss or vote on the ratification of each article from 
the previous meeting. More discussion took place, Samuel 
Poulten moved to add 575,000.00 to the Public Safety 
(Police). And to ratify the vote taken on Capital Outlay 
or Improvement. The Town Counsel ruled the motion out 
of order. He said that this action could not take place. The 
Town Meeting body could only vote on ratifying the entire 
action as a whole of the previous meeting. The Moderator 
concurred with Town Counsel's decision. Samuel Poulten 
wanted to go on record as challenging the ruling. The ques- 
tion was raised on, if there was any money available for 
funding the positions. Dwight Haywood of the Finance 
Committee, said that the Sinking Fund had S17.000.00 
available. James Doukszewicz said that there was only the 
availability of the sewer betterment money of 5500,000.00. 
Bernard Lynch felt that the money should be kept aside 
for either the anticipated shortfall of 51.4 million or the 
expansion of the sewer project. Liz Marshall spoke on be- 
ing in favor of the article and moved the question. The 
Moderator ruled the discussion is to continue because of 
his practice of not allowing statements and moving the 
question within the same speech. The discussion continued. 
Ronald Gamache wanted to table the article and the town 
meeting in order to allow further opinion from the Attorney 
General's Office regarding this ratification procedure. He 
moved to adjourn the meeting until Monday, January 7, 
1991, at 7:30 p.m., at the McCarthy Middle School. A 



62 



discussion took place. Ronald Gamache withdrew his mo- 
tion to adjourn to a time certain. He then moved to ad- 
journ the meeting. The Moderator explained the options 
of the motion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which 
left the chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken: Yes 73 No 47, motion carried to 
adjourn. 

Samuel Poulten moved to withdraw his request to chal- 
lenge the ruling of ratification, and wanted to know when 
the Selectmen were next meeting in order to submit war- 
rant articles. The Board of Selectmen announced that they 
will be meeting on December 17th, and that they will be 



calling for a Special Town Meeting to be held on Monday, 
January 7th, 1991. 

The Moderator announced for the Town Meeting Repre- 
sentatives to meet at this adjournment, within their 
precincts and choose among themselves one person to rep- 
resent the precinct on the newly-formed Rules Committee. 

The Moderator adjourned the meeting at 10:35 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



63 



TOWN MEETING 
REPRESENTATIVES 

PRECINCT 1 

NAME TERM 

William R. Logan 1993 

John P. Clancy (replaced H. Manahan 12-20-90) 1993 

Helen A. Manahan 1993 

Susan G. Koeckhoven 1993 

Sandra A. Kilburn 1993 

Barry B. Balan 1993 

Robert P. Joyce 1993 

Philip L. Currier 1992 

John G. Coppinger 1992 

Marian D. Currier 1992 

Robert E. Olson 1992 

Carl W. Seidel 1992 

Scott J. McCaig 1992 
John G. Mamalis (replaced R. McClure 12-20-90) 1991 

Richard P. McClure 1991 

Charles W. Frye 1991 

Martha McClure 1991 

William E. Spence 1991 

Robert M. Schneider 1991 

Jean B. Rook 1991 

PRECINCT 2 

NAME TERM 
Richard E DeFreitas (resigned 2-6-91 R. Scharn) 

Robert J. Scharn 1993 

George L. Merrill 1993 

Francis G. Miskell 1993 

Harry A. Foster 1993 

Susan M. Olsen 1993 

Harold I. Matzkin 1993 

Bonnie I. Foster 1992 

Loretta A. Gelenian 1992 

Barry T. Bell 1992 

George F. Abley 1992 

Kathryn A. Schmitz 1992 

David G. Conrad 1992 

Jeffrey W Stallard 1991 

Patricia A. Jamros 1991 

Karen S. Vandenbulcke 1991 

James A. DeProfio (repl. M. Vandenbulcke 12-20-90) 

Marc A. Vandenbulcke 1991 

Mary Jo Welch 1991 

Albert Leman 1991 

PRECINCT 3 

NAME TERM 

Carole A. Marcotte 1993 

D. Lorraine Lambert 1993 

Priscilla A. Rega 1993 

Brenda A. McDermott 1993 

Kathleen S. Fitzpatrick 1993 

Jane S. McKersie 1993 

John P. Emerson Jr. 1992 

Judith Haas 1992 

Stephen A. Gould (resigned 9-15-90 J. Hanlon) 1992 

John M. Hanlon 1992 

Thomas P. Regan 1992 

Michael F. Curran 1992 



Christine A. Gleason 1992 

Cynthia M. Sullivan 1991 

Thomas J. Welch 1991 

Robert D. Marazzi 1991 

Thomas E. Moran 1991 

Pamela S. Amway 1991 

Thomas F. Carey Jr. 1991 

PRECINCT 4 

NAME TERM 

Ruth K. Delaney 1993 

John T. Conrad Jr. 1993 

Bonita Towle 1993 

Gerald W. Pacht 1993 

John B. Sousa Jr. 1993 

Thomas E. Firth Jr. 1993 

Frances T. McDougall 1992 

Lynn M. Marcella 1992 

Linda J. Allen 1992 
Gary R. Wilson (replaced R. Hughes 12-20-90) 

Robert L. Hughes 1992 

Jeffrey A. Brem 1992 

Martha W Shelton 1992 

Kay E. Roberts 1991 

Donald P. Ayer 1991 

Beverly A. Koltookian 1991 

Daniel J. Sullivan III 1991 

Steven B. Hadley 1991 

Michael R. Parquette 1991 

PRECINCT 5 

NAME TERM 

Arnold J. Lovering 1993 

Barbara H. Ward 1993 

James M. Creegan 1993 

Wendy C. Marcks 1993 

Kathleen F. Hillman 1993 

David P. McLaughlin 1993 

Ronald W Wetmore 1992 

J. Ronald Gamache 1992 

Evelyn S. Thoren 1992 

Dean Carmeris 1992 

Glenn R. Thoren 1992 

Violet R. Stone 1992 

Steven J. Temple 1991 

Jonathan A. Stevens 1991 

Robert E. Brooks 1991 

W Allen Thomas Jr. 1991 
Frederick C. Marcks (Dec. repl. J. Hibbard 12-20-90) 

John R. Hibbard, Jr. 1991 

Catherine Brown 1991 

PRECINCT 6 

NAME TERM 

John W. Carson 1993 

Raymond P. McKeon 1993 

Margaret A. Johnson 1993 

Bradford O. Emerson 1993 

Janet G. Dubner 1993 

M. Elizabeth Marshall 1993 

David J. McLachlan 1992 

Aileen R. McCarthy 1992 

Roger A. Blomgren 1992 



64 



Edward S. Marshall 


1992 


Martin A. Gruber 


1992 


Cherul M. Wharshafsky 


1992 


Mary E. Frantz 


1991 


Brian J. Stanton 


1991 


James A. Sousa 


1991 


Earl C. Burt 


1991 


Francis X. Roark (replaced H. Hall 12-20-90) 




Howard J. Hall 


1991 


John Demers 


1991 


PRECINCT 7 




NAME 


TERM 


Dennis J. Ready 


1993 


Susan J. Gates 


1993 


Edward H. Hilliard 


1993 


Joan M. Gauthier 


1993 


Bernard A. Ready 


1993 


Mark W. Gauthier 


1993 


John F. Geary, Jr. 


1992 


Andrew V. Silinish 


1992 


Kathryn Brough 


1992 


Bruce A. Kunkel 


1992 


Leonard W. Doolan III 


1992 


Dwight M. Hayward 


1992 


Carol A. Stark 


1991 


Frederick W. Wikander 


1991 


Nicholas G. Gavriel (replaced T. Mills 12-20-90) 


Thomas E. Mills 


1991 


Charles A. Cook 


1991 


Stratos G. Dukakis 


1991 


Margaret A. Schloeman 


1991 


PRECINCT 8 




NAME 


TERM 


Walter A. Cleven 


1993 


Stuart G. Weisfeldt 


1993 


Doris J. Mahoney 


1993 


William P. Keohane 


1993 


William F. Dalton 


1993 


Richard J. Day 


1993 


Cynthia A. Walcott 


1992 


Carrie A. Steiman 


1992 


Henry E. Sullivan 


1992 


Richard P. Greska 


1992 


Daniel W. Burke 


1992 


Reginald M. Larkin (Dec. repl. S. Norkunas 12-20-90) 


Stanley W Norkunas 


1992 


Cheryl Adkins Boss 


1991 


Bruce J. Harper, Sr. 


1991 


Alexander W. Gervais 


1991 


Peter G. Johnson 


1991 


Samuel Poulten 


1991 


Evelyn P. Bell 


1991 


PRECINCT 9 




NAME 


TERM 


Eleanor D. Abbott 


1993 


Alan R. Pajak 


1993 


John S. Fudge Jr. 


1993 


Roland E. Linstad 


1993 


Elizabeth A. McCarthy 


1993 


Doris A. Tereshko 


1993 



Alan L. Moyer 


1992 


Barbara J. Scavezze 


1992 


Samuel J. Brink 


1992 


Donald L. Elias 


1992 


James P. Good 


1992 


Donald N. Keirstead (resigned 12-23-90) 




Allan T. Galpin Jr. 


1991 


Robert M. Sexton Jr. 


1991 


Cynthia J. Kaplan 


1991 


Frank R. Peterson 


1991 


Edward A. Cady 


1991 


George M. Goguen 


1991 


**pct. members to fill expires 4/1991 then becomes unexp. 1 yr. 


erm 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

MODERATOR Elected 

3 Yr. Term 1993 
Dennis E. McHugh 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips, Chairman Appointed by T.M. 

4/11/90 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1992 

Richard P. Tevlin Term Expires 1991 

CEMETERY COMMISSION Elected 3 Yr. Term 

Charlotte P. DeWolf Term Expires 1993 

Gerald L. Hardy Term Expires 1992 

Everett V. Olsen, Chairman Term Expires 1991 

Cemetery Superintendent: Frank R. Peterson 

CONSTABLE Elected 3 Yr. Term 

William E. Spence Term Expires 1992 

BOARD OF HEALTH Elected 3 Yr. Term 

Mark W. Gauthier, Clerk Term Expires 1993 

Paul J. Canniff, Vice Chairman . . . .Term Expires 1992 

Paul F. McCarthy, Chairman Term Expires 1991 

Appt. Dr. Michael Dean 
Director: Richard J. Day 
Nurse: Judy Dunigan 

HOUSING AUTHORITY Elected 5 Yr. Term 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman Term Expires 1995 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1993 

Lynn M. Marcella Term Expires 1992 

William P. Keohane Term Expires 1991 

Pamela Turnbull Gov appt 7/93 

Lisa Royce, Director 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES Elected 3 Yr. Term 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy, Treasurer . . . Term Expires 1993 

D. Lorraine Lambert Term Expires 1993 

Lynda Reid Warren, Secretary Term Expires 1993 

Janet B. Hendl, Chairman Term Expires 1992 

Sarah L. Warner, Vice Chairman. . .Term Expires 1992 
Susan G. Cantin Term Expires 1991 



65 



PARK COMMISSION 

Abolished 4/4/89 

Passage of Charter-see DPW 

PLANNING BOARD Elected 3 Yr. Term 

Eugene E. Gilet Term Expires 1993 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Chairman . . . .Term Expires 1993 

Ann H. McCarthy Term Expires 1992 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Vice Chairman. .Term Expires 1991 

James P. Good Term Expires 1991 

Christine A. Gleason, Clerk Term Expires 1991 

Clerk: Joan Garland 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE Elected 3 Yr. Term 

Judith B. Mallette, Secretary Term Expires 1993 

Mary E. Frantz Term Expires 1993 

Carl A. Olsson, Vice Chairman . . . .Term Expires 1992 

Wendy C. Marcks, Chairman Term Expires 1992 

Barbara H. Ward Term Expires 1991 

SELECTMEN Elected 3 Yr. Term 

Roger A. Blomgren Term Expires 1993 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman . . .Term Expires 1992 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Clerk Term Expires 1992 

Bonita A. Towle, Chairman Term Expires 1991 

Bradford O. Emerson Term Expires 1991 

SEWER COMMISSION Elected 3 Yr. Term 

Robert P. Joyce, Clerk Term Expires 1993 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1993 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1992 

Barry B. Balan, Chairman Term Expires 1991 

Elected 2 Yr. Term 

Jeffrey A. Brem Term Expires 1992 

Sewer Supt: James Casparro 

TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire Appointed by T.M. 4/11/90 

Ass't. Town Clerk Elizabeth L. Delaney 

TOWN TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

James R. Doukszewicz Appointed by T.M. 4/11/90 

Ass't. Treas. Carol Lambert 

TREE WARDEN 

Abolished 4/4/89 

Passage of Charter-see DPW 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

This year was the first full year of the consolidation of 
many departments into a Department of Public Works. 
This format has many advantages for the Town of Chelms- 
ford whereas much equipment, experience and many fine 
employees can pool their resources and assist with the ac- 
tivities of other Divisions all in the interest of providing bet- 
ter operation and maintenance of the public facilities and 
infrastructure owned by and serving the Town of Chelms- 
ford. I would like to thank each employee of the DPW for 
their part in reaching this goal. 



ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division once again worked closely with 
the Highway and Sewer Divisions providing design work, 
computerization, field inspection and reporting on a variety 
of projects. One of the larger projects undertaken was a 
complete inventory of 200 miles of town streets along with 
roadway conditions for each. This information was then 
computerized into a data base and is valuable in review- 
ing and planning the pavement maintenance needs and 
strategies for the coming years. The engineers also assisted 
the Planning Board in site plan reviews and subdivision 
review, construction monitoring and costs estimates. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

The maintenance of all town streets was carried out in 
the usual manner. This includes street sweeping, basin 
cleaning and repairs, cleaning of culverts and drainage 
easement, patching pot holes and washouts, replacement 
and erection of street signs, painting of traffic lines and 
cross walks, guard rail repair, roadside mowing and brush 
trimming. In the winter months the department sanded, 
salted, plowed and removed snow when necessary, to in- 
sure safe travel for the public. 

List of Projects: 

• Riverneck Road (Widen curve) 

• Proctor Road & Park Road (Construct traffic 
safety island) 

Random & Multi Crack-Sealing in Bituminous Concrete 
Pavement at following locations: 

• North Road (Portions) 

• Acton Road (Portions) 

• Dalton Road (Portions) 

• Westford St. (Portions) 

• Groton Road (Portions) 

• Graniteville Rd. (Portions) 

Bituminous Concrete Curbing installed at the following 
locations: 

• Westford St. (Two locations) 

• Boston Road (Portion) 

• Old Westford Rd. (Portion) 

Bituminous Concrete surface installed at the following 
locations: 

• Riverneck Road 

• Allen Street 

• North Road 

• Bradford Rd. Ext. 

• Swain Road (Landfill) 

• Dayton Street 

Handicapped accessibility ramps were constructed in the 
sidewalk area on Boston Road at Adams Library, North 
Road at Fletcher St., and Chelmsford Common area. 

Granite curbing was installed on Boston Road at the 
Purity shopping area. (Curbing was donated by Purity 
Supreme Stores). 

A 2500 Gallon Calcium storage tank was purchased and 
installed at the highway yard for storage of liquid calcium 
which is mixed with sand for road sanding operations. Two 



66 



70-gallon saddle tanks were purchased and mounted on 
sanders for use in dispensing the calcium mix onto the 
roadways. 

Michael A. Crory resigned on September 14, 1990. Mr. 
Crory was Superintendent of Streets since 1988. Shirley Flet- 
cher retired as part-time clerk in September after many 
years of dedicated service to the Town. Shirley's efficiency 
and always pleasant demeanor will be missed. In April, 
Pearl Koulas celebrated the 40th anniversary of her employ- 
ment with the Town of Chelmsford. As any present or 
former superintendent will attest, Pearl is the glue that 
keeps the entire highway operation together. Personally, I 
hope that Pearl agrees to stay with us for at least 40 more 
years. 

PARKS and RECREATION DIVISION 

The Parks Division continued with its exceptional job 
of caring for the towns' many parks areas and grassed traffic 
islands. This year we tried an "Adopt- Park" program where 
area residents or firms volunteered to cut the grass at a 
small traffic island to allow our Superintendent and part- 
time summer helper to concentrate more on upgrading and 
maintaining the recreational park areas. Many thanks to 
the participants for their generous assistance. 

December saw longtime Parks Superintendent Don Gray 
retire after 27 years with the Town. Don was truly a valuable 
employee who worked as long and has hard as was neces- 
sary to complete his overwhelming task of caring for the 
many park areas, most times working alone. We wish Don 
well in his retirement. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

The Public Building Division has been severely trimmed 
back in recent years due to budget reductions. Unfortunate- 
ly this year saw Mrs. Frances "Fay" Johnson leave due to 
a reduction in force. Mrs. Johnson was a tireless worker 
about whom we had received many compliments. Hope- 
fully, Fay will be able to rejoin our staff in the near future. 
This year Bob Deletetsky oversaw the installation of 12 
automatic setback thermostats in the Town Hall building. 
This allows us to reduce the temperature in unused rooms 
and on weekends and holidays. We consider the program 
a success and plan to outfit the remainder of the areas with 
similar units before next winter. Many thanks to Supt. Bob 
Deletetsky, Pat Murtaugh and Jerry Johnson for their will- 
ingness to adjust to the varying schedules required due to 
the variety of uses of the public buildings. 

SEWER DIVISION 

The Chelmsford Department of Public Works is respon- 
sible for the sewer building connections, along with pipeline 
and pump station operation and maintenance. 



The flows from Chelmsford to the Lowell Regional Water 
and Wastewater Utilities from July 1, 1990 to date are as 
follows: 

Katrina Road Pump Station 54,559,300 

Southwell Field Pump Station 61,864,500 

TOTAL 116,423,800 

Residents are reminded that the Town By-Laws require 
connection to the public sewer within one year of the date 
the system in front of their property is approved for use. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James E. Pearson, PE. 
Director of Public Works 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members 

Chairman Paul Canniff 

Vice Chairman Mark Gauthier 

Clerk Paul McCarthy 

Health Department Personnel 



Director of Public Health 
Health Inspector/ Asst. 
Departmental Assistant 
Town Nurse 
Town Physician 



Richard J. Day 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Diana L. Wright 

Judith Dunigan, R.N. 

Eric P. Kaplan, M.D. 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1990 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. The 
Board of Health has continued to run its dye testing and 
water sampling program and positive results are being seen. 
Numerous tests have been performed by the Board of 
Health along with the issuance of septic system permits for 
repairs and for new construction. The Board has again in- 
stituted new regulations to more specifically address fur- 
ther protection of water quality in town. 

Administration and Managment 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 



Percolation Tests — 14 

Deep Tests — 66 

Sewage Repair Permits — 75 

Sewage Construction Permits - 

Miscellaneous License & Fees 



28 



S 700 

3.300 

1,875 

1,400 

15,489 



The following sewer units have been or are expected to 
be connected to the sewer system by July 1, 1991: 

North Chelmford and Richardson Rd. Area 907 

Wellman Avenue 455 

Center 322 

Golden Cove and Kensington Road Area 65 

Industrial District 84 

TOTAL 1,843 



Complaint and Inspectional Services 

During 1990 four inspections were made at new and ex- 
isting day care centers; one hundred twenty-three inspec- 
tions were made for Chapter II Housing: eight school in- 
spections; three hundred ten complaints received and 
checked; Camp Paul inspections; thirty bathing beaches 
inspections; three International Certificates of Vaccination, 
restaurant and retail food store inspections; one hundred 
twenty-three establishments in town inspected twice a year. 



67 



Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was reap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's Hazar- 
dous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to en- 
force the "Right-to-Know" law for this town. The position 
encompasses actions betwen State, Federal agencies, the 
business community and the general public. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewaters has open- 
ed up a whole new area to be monitored. A continuing 
number of incidents have required a cooperative effort be- 
tween the town and DEP officials. It is the goal of the Board 
of Health, along with other town departments, to keep 
abreast of all current changes and updates in the handl- 
ing and disposal of all toxic wastes and to supersede any 
state and federal standards where it would best serve to pro- 
tect this community and its precious water supplies. 

Communicable Disease Program 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health man- 
dates that an epidemiological investigation be undertaken 
on approximately forty-eight communicable diseases. 
When a communicable disease is reported to the Health 
Department by a physician or hospital, the nurse contacts 
the person involved to ascertain if a probable source of the 
infection can be determined. In some communicable 
diseases it is necessary that food handlers or family 
members are removed from their jobs during the period 
of communicability. The follow-up report is submitted to 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Reports 
on the following diseases were completed during 1990: 

Lyme Disease 1 

Hepatitis B 4 

Salmonella 16 

Campylobacter Enteritis 11 

Giardiasis 3 

Yersiniosis 1 

Pertussis 3 

Baterial Meningitis 2 

Viral Meningitis 1 

Active Tuberculosis 1 

Tuberculosis Control Program* 58 

•Referrals received from the Lowell Chest Clinic and 
Middlesex Community Hospital TB Clinic. 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those 
persons whose employment require certification of freedom 
from that disease is another responsibility of the Town 
Nurse. One hundred fifty-nine mantoux (TB) tests were 
given to town residents for pre-employment and to 
household contacts of active cases in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health regulations. 
Home visits and telephone calls are made to families of ac- 
tive and some inactive tuberculosis cases on a periodic basis 
to insure understanding of the illness and that adequate 
medical follow-up is achieved. Numerous medical records 
are kept and updated on residents who have a positive (TB) 
mantoux test and are receiving medication prophylactically 
and being followed radiologically at the Lowell Chest 
Clinic. 

AIDS and Venereal Disease are reported by the physi- 
cian directly to the State Department of Public Health to 
maintain patient confidentiality. 



Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging sponsored 
two flu clinics this year. Sixty-three persons were immunized 
with pneumonia vaccine and one thousand sixty- three per- 
sons were immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. An addi- 
tional one hundred and eighty doses were given to nursing 
homes, thirty doses to school nurses for staff, seven home 
visits were made to handicapped or house-bound residents 
and thirty-one doses to McFarlin Manor and Chelmsford 
Arms residents. A total of one thousand sixty-three doses 
of flu vaccine were administered in town. 

One hundred seven immunizations were administered 
to adults and students records in compliance with the Mass- 
achusetts School Immunization Laws and prophylatically 
to residents traveling to underdeveloped countries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the first 
Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board 
of Health, Town Offices. Four hundred thirty- four residents 
attended the screenings. 

Diabetic Screening Program 

This procedure takes a short time, involves a small sam- 
ple of blood by finger prick method, and can be done either 
fasting or two hours after meals. Residents may call the 
Health Department office and make an appointment with 
the nurse at 250-5243. 

Cholesterol Screening Program 

Cholesterol screenings were offered to residents several 
times during the year. A nominal fee was charged and the 
dates were announced in the newspapers several weeks prior 
to the screening. One hundred fifty-one residents were 
screened for cholesterol. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Health Department offers free lead paint testing of 
children between ages nine months and six years. The pro- 
cedure takes a short time and involves a small sample of 
blood by finger prick method. The blood sample is then 
sent to the State lab for testing. We will forward the results 
to your physician. Residents may call the Health Dept. at 
250-5243 and make an appointment with the nurse. Fifty- 
seven children were screened for lead paint. 

Health Fair 

The Town's seventh Health Fair will be held on Satur- 
day, May 18, 1991 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Westford. 
This will be held in conjunction with the Westford Health 
Department and be open to both Chelmsford and Westford 
residents. Free screenings to be offered include: blood 
pressure, height, weight, vision, glaucoma, blood sugar, 
blood chemistry to include a cardiac risk profile plus many 
more. Details will be announced in the newspapers or call 
the Health Dept. at 250-5243. 

Mammography Screenings 

A Mammography Screening was held at the Town Hall 
and twenty-six residents attended. The next screening will 
be held December 1991. Call for an appointment. 

Vial of Life Program 

The Chelmsford Health Department and Council on Ag- 



68 



ing in conjunction with St. Joseph's Hospital, Lowell, will 
be offering the Vial of Life Program to elderly residents 
of Chelmsford and anyone else with chronic illnesses or 
medical problems, including children. This Vial of Life 
will help you provide valuable medical information to those 
responding in an emergency. 

The vial is a plastic tube which contains vital medical 
information and persons to contact in case of an emergency. 
The vial is placed inside the refrigerator on the top shelf, 
and a Vial of Life sticker is placed on the outside of the 
refrigerator on the top right corner to alert rescue squad 
personnel in the event of an emergency. 

The vials are free of charge and may be picked up at 
the Council on Aging, 75 Groton Road; the Chelmsford 
Board of Health, Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road and the 
Adams Library, Boston Road. 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members 

Pennryn D. Fitts, Chairman 

Joan M. Gauthier, Vice Chairman 

Angela S. Consgrove, Clerk 

John Demers 

Harold I. Matzkin 

Clerk 

Louise Beauchesne 

The Personnel Board meets on the second Tuesday of 
each month at the Town Offices building. Special work ses- 
sions are scheduled when necessary. 

The Personnel Board consists of five persons (four ap- 
pointed by the Town Manager and one elected by non- 
union Town employees). 

An extensive salary survey was completed this year, and 
the Board developed further existing contact with person- 
nel boards in other communities, exchanging information 
and ideas concerning how best to plan for the Town's per- 
sonnel needs. 

The Board continues to exercise an advisory role; it no 
longer administers directly under the Personnel By-Laws. 
Rather, it reviews all personnel actions proposed by the 
Town Manager, making recommendations to him concern- 
ing those actions based upon established Town policy and 
the latest information available regarding personnel issues. 

In this role, the Personnel Board supports fair, equitable 
personnel practices affecting current Town employees and 
it perpetuates Chelmsford's reputation for attracting highly 
skilled and motivated employees. 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commis- 
sioners worked diligently over the past year with Town and 
State Officials to complete work on the new elderly and 
family developments. The Commissioners held an open 
house in August 1989 for the four (4) family units 
rehabilitated on the corner of James and John Streets in 
North Chelmsford. The family units on Mill Road were 
open in November 1989 and the family units on Sheila 
Avenue were occupied in March 1990. All family units are 
three (3) bedroom with one of the units set up for a 
physically handicapped member. The elderly development 
is located on 8 Sheila Avenue in North Chelmsford. The 
Ruth K. Delaney Housing for the Elderly has forty eight 
(48) units, three (3) of which are for the handicapped and 
one (1) bedroom unit is for the frail elderly who need extra 
care, but are able to live independently. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs, as of June 
30, 1990, provide a total of 283 units of low income hous- 
ing, 140 elderly, 14 handicapped, 129 family. Six of the 
Authority's programs are funded by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts through the Executive Office of Com- 
munities and Development under Chapter 667 and Chapter 
705; Chelmsford Arms completed in 1974, 56 regular units 
and 8 handicapped units; the Community Residence pur- 
chased in 1974 for the mildly to moderately retarded, 8 
units; 6 two bedroom condominiums in Pickwick Estates 
were purchased in 1981; McFarlin Manor completed in 
1981, 43 regular units, 3 handicapped units, 1 four- 
bedroom congregate unit which serves the "semi- 
independent elderly." Under Chapter 707, the Authoritys' 
"scattered site" program began in 1974, there are 32 units 
under lease in the private market. Under the Chapter 705 
family program, the units are scattered around Chelmsford 
on sites mentioned previously. The Section 8 Existing 
Housing Program presently has 58 certificates under lease 
and 84 certificates leased under the Section 8 Voucher 
Program. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority year ending finan- 
cial statement lists assets at $7,847,548., liabilities at 
$7,847,548. for all developments. All developments are 
formally inspected annually by maintenance and admin- 
istrative staff. The Authority is especially grateful to those 
organizations which express special concern for the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority residents, and to the 
Chelmsford Garden Club for their assistance in the 
beautification of the developments every year. 

Members of the staff include, MaryE. Royce, Executive 
Director, Helen Cantara, Administrative Assistant, Linda 
Dalton, Junior Clerk, Robert Trainor, Full-time Mainten- 
ance Mechanic and Richard O'Neil, Part-Time Mainten- 
ance Laborer and Paul St. Louis, Grounds Keeper. Regular 
meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson Street at 
7:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday each month. The Annual 
meeting is first Tuesday in May. All meetings are opened 
to the public. The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board 
of Commissioners would like to thank the residents of 
Chelmsford and Town Officials for their continued support 
and cooperation. 



69 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 



NAME 

Ruth K. Delaney 
Robert L. Hughes 
William P. Keohane 
Lynn Marcella 
Pamela A. Turnbull 



TERM 
TITLE EXPIRES 

Chairman 1995 

Vice Chairman 1993 

Treasurer 1991 

Asst. Treasurer 1992 

Member 1993 

(State Appointee) 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, 25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

Janet Hendl, Chairperson 
Sarah Warner, Vice Chairperson 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 
Lynda Warren, Secretary 
D. Lorraine Lambert 
Susan G. Cantin 
James Decker 

Collections and Circulations: The library circulated 
293,140 items during 1990 and answered over 10,000 
reference and research questions for residents of all ages. 
The library has over 26,000 registered borrowers. In 
March, the library introduced new on-line computer 
catalogs. These catalogs give instant access to Chelmsford 
Public Library's collections and to the collections of the 
22 libraries in the Merrimac Valley Library Consortium. 
The on line or public access catalogs make available to 
our patrons nearly 1 million unique titles and encourages 
resource sharing and cooperation among area libraries. 
The Library's collection felt the impact of a 34% reduc- 
tion in its book budget. Purchasing was severely limited 
and long lists were the norm for popular titles. 

Programs and Services: Because of staff lay-offs, pro- 
grams and services were reduced on all levels. The library 
staff, however, continued to sponsor lectures and programs 
on a monthly basis throughout the year. These ranged from 
a successful "Love your Library" contest which involved 
over 700 patrons to health programs such as cholesterol 
screening and a stress workshop. The Children's House and 
MacKay Branch Library sponsored a Summer Reading 
Program in which 553 children participated. Children's 
storyhours continued at both the Children's House and the 
MacKay Branch Library. Laura Husted, a library 
volunteer, conducted storyhours at the MacKay Branch 
Library. The Friends of the Library continued to support 
library activities with many donations including a subscrip- 
tion to a CD-ROM periodical index and museum passes 
to the Boston Aquarium, Children's and Science Musuems, 
and the Museum of Fine Arts. Finally, staff lay-offs resulted 
in reducing the number of hours the library was open to 
the public. The MacKay Branch Library had its hours cut 



in half. The Adams Library closed Sundays and Thurs- 
day morning. The Children's House closed all day on 
Thursday. 

Personnel: Mary Mahoney joined the Library staff as 
Director on February 12, 1990. In January, Judith 
Hildebrandt resigned as Head of Reference and was 
replaced by Joseph Wisniewski. Gloria Jacobs resigned as 
Head of Technical Service and was replaced by Laura 
Kulik. Marguerite Donald retired in March. Due to budget 
constraints, the library laid-off 13 part-time library 
assistants in July. These library employees had given a total 
of 43 years of service to the Chelmsford Library. Volunteers 
continued to be a vital support for library staff throughout 
the year. 

Facilities: Maintenance of the century old facilities is 
on-going. The Children's and Carriage Houses had vinyl 
siding installed to replace "rotted" cedar shingles; The ceil- 
ings in the Children's House, which had extensive water 
damage and were falling down, were replaced. New 
carpeting was installed. The Carriage House was treated 
for a severe termite infestation. Both the Children's House 
and Carriage House were insulated for energy conserva- 
tion. The Friends of the Library provided the paint to paint 
the interior of the Children's House and the Newcomer's 
Club gave a donation for new study tables. The Adams 
Library was reorganized. With budget cutbacks, the Fine 
Arts Department was eliminated. The Reference Depart- 
ment moved to the second floor in order to gain additional 
shelving and study areas. The leaking pipes in the base- 
ment level were replaced which involved removing the 
entire ceiling and replacing all the lighting fixtures. All 
four library buildings were hooked up to the Town's sewer 
and the parking lots were repaved. The front walk of 
Adams was replaced because the old walk was cracked and 
was a safety hazard. The MacKay Library had a new oil 
burner installed. 

Goals: Despite the repairs and improvements to the 
library facilities, the Library Trustees recognize that 
buildings remain inadequate for current library needs. In 
fact, the buildings inhibit good library service because of 
the lack of handicapped access, shelving, seating, study 
and work spaces. The Library Endowment Committee and 
the Library Site Committee continue to work and plan for 
a new or expanded library facility. The current fiscal 
limitations are a strain on library service; however, the 
Trustees and Staff continue to work to provide a quality 
library for residents. 

Statistical Reports 



Monies deposited with Town Treasurer 

from fees, fines & lost materials 
Circulation: 293,140 
Staff: (full-time) 113 

(part-time) 5.7 (FTE's) 

Departments: 

Assistant Director: Sandra Yensen 
Reference: Joseph Wisniewski 
Children's: Cheryl Zani 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 



$19,016.39 



70 



Community Services: Judy Buswick 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Technical Service: Laura Kulik 
Maintenance: John Reslow 



Respectfully submitted, 

Mary E. Mahoney 
Library Director 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Serving the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton 
Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and Westford 

DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Thomas Carey 

J. James Howells 

Ellen Hargraves, Chairman 

Howard Burns, Vice Chairman 

John Donohoe 

Stratos Dukakis 

Augustine Kish, Secretary 

Irene Machemer 

Robert Manning 

Charlotte Scott 

Jerrilyn Bozicas 

Joan O'Brien 

ALTERNATES 
Harvey Atkins, Jr. 
Stephen Dunbar 
Kevin Finnegan 
L. Peter Noddin 
Jordan Waugh 
Ronald Wetmore 
Al Buckley 

ADMINISTRATION 
Bernholdt Nystrom Superintendent-Director 

David McLaughlin Assistant Director/ Principal 

Ralph Dumas Accounting Manager 

SUPERVISION 
Victor Kiloski Academic Coordinator 

Paul Royte Guidance Director 

Paula Page Special Education Coordinator 



and provides its students with on-the-job training, saleable 
skills, a co-op program, a high school diploma, a trade 
certificate, an opportunity for further education at a col- 
lege of their choice and job placement. 

Over the past decade, the record of employment for our 
graduates has averaged approximately 90%. Each year 
qualified seniors may elect to take advantage of our Co- 
op Training Program which allows senior students to work 
in industry during their shop weeks and receive valuable 
training in their chosen fields as well as a salary. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba 
Technical High School: 





Technical Programs 


1, Littleton, 


Auto Body Horticulture/ Landscaping 




Automotive Machine 




Carpentry Medical Occupations 


EE 


Culinary Arts and Baking Metal Fabrication 


Chelmsford 


Data Processing and Welding 


Westford 


Drafting Painting and Decorating 


Groton 


Electrical Plumbing and Heating 


Pepperell 


Electronics Printing 


Chelmsford 


Building and Grounds 


Chelmsford 




Littleton 


Academic Programs 


Townsend 


English Geometry 


Shirley 


Social Studies Trigonometry 


Westford 


U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 


Pepperell 


Consumer Education Biology 


Westford 


General Mathematics Physics 




Algebra Chemistry 


Littleton 


How to Start Your Own Business 


Townsend 




Westford 


In addition to the technical and academic programs, 


Shirley 


a full Inter-Scholastic Athletic Program is offered to the 


Groton 


students. 


Chelmsford 




Pepperell 


ADULT EDUCATION 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult Educa- 
tion Program is open to anyone of high school age or over. 
Residents from all communities are welcome to participate 
in the many diversified courses which are offered during 
both the fall and spring semesters. This year 713 students 
enrolled in our Adult Education Program during the fall 
and winter semesters. 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School's enrollment, as 
of October 1, 1990 is as follows: 

Chelmsford 106 

Groton 51 

Littleton 27 

Pepperell 89 

Shirley 34 

Townsend 54 

Westford 72 

Ayer (tuitioned) 55 

Total 488 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited by 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. 



PLANNING BOARD 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Chairman 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Vice Chairman 

Christine A. Gleason, Clerk 

Eugene E. Gilet 

James P. Good 

Ann H. McCarthy 

John F. McCarthy 

Principal Clerk, Joan L. Garland 

The Chelmsford Planning Board began the year by 
reorganizing the Board and appointed Mr. Thomas E. 



71 



Firth, Jr. as Chairman, Mr. Kim J. MacKenzie as Vice 
Chairman, Ms. Christine A. Gleason as Clerk. Mr. Eugene 
Gilet is the representative to the Northern Middlesex Coun- 
cil of Governments. 

In 1990, two (2) Subdivisions plans were approved. They 
were located in the following areas: 7 Lots on Hildreth 
Street and 3 Lots on School Street. 

Eight (8) Site Plans were approved in 1990. 

Twenty-nine (29) Form A Plans, Subdivision Control Law 
Not Required, were signed by the Chelmsford Planning 
Board. 



72 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Left to right: Mary Frantz; Carl Olsson, Vice Chairman; Wendy Marcks, Chairman; Bar- 
bara Ward; Judith Mallette, Secretary; Donna Sartz, Student Representative; Richard Moser, 
Superintendent. 



73 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The Chelmsford School Committee began the 1990 
school year with a central office reorganization that includ- 
ed the employment of a Superintendent, Dr. Richard H. 
Moser; an Assistant Superintendent, Dr. David Troughton; 
a Business Manager, Mr. Sylvester Ingeme; a Director of 
Elementary Education, Mrs. Mary Ellen Normandin; and 
a Director of Educational Technology, Mr. Bernard 
DiNatale. The new organization represents a decrease of 
one central office administrator from the previous school 
year. 

The 1990 school year began with the challenge of reduc- 
ing the school budget by $506,000 to meet the pressures 
of a decrease in state funding and the constraints of limited 
town resources. The reductions included cutbacks in educa- 
tional supplies, instructional materials, substitute 
employees, transportation, School Committee expenses, 
and school personnel. 

The $506,000 reduction was followed with the need to 
plan for a FY'92 budget in excess of $3,000,000 less than- 
the voted budget for FY '91. Severe reductions in person- 
nel, operating expenses, and instructional resources have 
been contemplated. The Chelmsford School Committee 
continues to work toward support of public education in 
the wake of declining resources, severe program cutbacks, 
and only a glimpse of change for the future. 

Despite a difficult financial picture, the Chelmsford staff 
has continued to contribute to a quest for quality educa- 
tion for Chelmsford youth. The following reports will pro- 
vide a description of some of the accomplishments of our 
staff and students. We are proud of our school community 
and look forward to a more favorable financial climate to 
match the enthusiasm and energy of our young people. 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

There are currently 1,515 students with 97 full-time and 
11 part-time teachers, six counselors, a principal and three 
house deans at the high school. Three staff members have 
earned doctor's degrees and 99 have earned master's 
degrees. Two of our teachers have authored books this year 
and one was recognized in Who's Who in Education. Our 
student profile is also one that we are proud of. There are 
eight National Merit Finalists, 22 National Merit Commen- 
dation Winners and 86 percent of our students go on to 
higher education. 

Our student body is very active in the co-curricular life 
of the school and in the community. We have an active 
chapter of the Thomas Jefferson Forum which focusess on 
community volunteerism. We have 32 school-sponsored ac- 
tivities and clubs. Our Student Council has been recognized 
by the state as exemplary the past three years and its 
membership includes the National, State and local 



presidents. Our calculus team is the National Champion; 
our math team placed third in New England; our com- 
puter team placed ninth nationally; our literary magazine 
received first place honors; our newspaper received honors; 
and our television club produced two award-winning 
works. 

We have twenty-four interscholastic athletic teams which 
produced many individual and team champions at con- 
ference and state levels. We have students who have achiev- 
ed state, New England and National Ail-American honors. 

The high school staff will be undergoing a year-long self- 
assessment which will provide, us an opportunity to explore 
all avenues for delivering the same quality educational pro- 
grams more efficiently with fewer resources. 



from the principal of 
the McCarthy middle school 

The McCarthy Middle School currently houses grades 
six, seven, and eight and services over 1150 students. 
Although the building has been in use for thirty- two years, 
it is well maintained largely due to the efforts of students, 
teachers, and custodial staff. 

This year, the special education staff in cooperation with 
a team of sixth grade teachers has begun a pilot integra- 
tion program. This program provides the assistance of the 
resource room teacher and the resource room E.S.P. to 
the regular students as well as the special education 
students in the areas of science and mathematics. 
Throughout the year, the program will be evaluated and 
monitored in order to make appropriate changes to im- 
prove student instruction. Hopefully in future years, this 
type of program will be available to special education 
students at all grade levels in the McCarthy Middle School. 

The number of classes of students utilizing the computer 
rooms continues to increase at all grade levels. Through 
the efforts of Mrs. Betty Hanson and Mrs. Sheila Kelly, 
the use of computers in the general music program has 
expanded the horizons for many students. 

The students at the McCarthy Middle School have con- 
tinued to show an awareness of their social responsibility 
through such efforts as "Project 300," providing food 
baskets for the needy, and their support of our troops sta- 
tioned in foreign lands. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR MATHEMATICS GRADES 9-12 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department 
continues to adapt its curriculum to meet the needs of our 
students. The Pre-Algebra course, initiated two years ago, 
has proven to be successful with our lower achieving 
students. If a student is successful in this course, he is 



74 



recommended to continue in the college preparatory pro- 
gram and is encouraged to elect Algebra One. If a stu- 
dent has difficulty passing Pre-Algebra he is recommend- 
ed to take a skills and/or consumer mathematics course. 

Due to budgetary constraints the High School 
Mathematics Department was reduced by three teaching 
sections (60% of a teaching position). Fortunately, it did 
not cause any course to be eliminated from running. 
However, further reductions in force will definitely cause 
the elimination of courses with low subscription. This will 
have an adverse effect on the quality of education that our 
children will receive. 

I would like to congratulate Joseph Ford, whose Calculus 
Team won the Calculus League National Championship 
and also congratulate Richard Olson, whose Computer 
League Team was ranked ninth nationally. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES (GRADES 9-12) 

The world has undergone tremendous change in the last 
year. The Berlin Wall has been torn down, Germany is 
being unified, the desire for sovereignty has been express- 
ed in a number of Soviet states, and the United States a 
strong stand in the Middle East. The Social Studies Depart- 
ment at Chelmsford High School continues to offer a strong 
core curriculum that includes political science, world 
history and United States History as well as electives that 
include courses in economics, psychology, sociology, in- 
ternational relations, law, Asian studies, and the holocaust. 
Through these courses and several co-curricular activities, 
the veteran staff prepares students for active, informed 
citizenship on the local, state, national and international 
levels. 

Co-curricular activities include an International Rela- 
tions Club that participates in several Model United Na- 
tions programs, the Chelmsford Education Foundation 
News Quiz Championship, The Framingham State Essay 
Contest, National History Day competition and Citizen Bee 
among others. 

Department members are hopeful that they will be able 
to maintain the strong program that has developed and 
are committed to the continued professional growth and 
effort that are necessary for that to happen. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH (GRADES 9-12) 

For the second consecutive year, a Chelmsford High 
senior and the High School English Department were 
recognized nationally by the National Council of the 
Teachers of English. Joshua Safdie, Class of 1991, was one 



of only 13% to be recognized for superior writing in the 
NCTE Achievement Awards in Writing; the English depart- 
ment was commended "for excellence in its instructional 
program by the NCTE." 

Other achieved honors include the awarding of First 
Place to Kristen Wikander, Second Place to Martha Seneta, 
and an Honorable Mention to Leslie Steinman, all from 
the Class of 1993, in the UMass Excellence in Expository 
Writing Program; the Bard College Prize for Critical 
Writing awarded to Karl Wagner; a Second Place (local) 
and Third Place (regional) Awards to Daniel Isleib, Class 
of 1991, in the Voice of Democracy speechwriting program 
sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars; the achieve- 
ment of First Place in the state and Tenth Place nationally 
by our ninth graders in the Language Arts Olympiad; the 
qualification of fifteen of our senior English Advanced 
Placement students for college credit on the national stan- 
dardized test. The naming of Stephen Meidell, Department 
Head, English, to Who's Who in Teaching; the participa- 
tion by Liz Foster, high school English teacher, in both the 
New England Association of Teachers of English and Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English conferences. 

The English Department of the high school will continue 
to be involved in professional conferences and workshops 
to update our curriculum so that we may meet the needs 
and challenge our students to perform to their potential. 
One program to be initiated in 1990-91 is a recognition 
of student writing across the curriculum tentatively titled 
"The Writings On The Wall." This would provide bulletin 
board space in a prominent area to display effective writing 
by high school students at all levels and in various subject 
areas. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE (GRADES 9-12) 

Mr. Donald Parkhurst, after twenty years of teaching 
chemistry at the high school, has left the system. Mr. 
Parkhurst was an inspiration to us all at Chelmsford High 
School and the Science Department in particular. His total 
commitment to his profession made us all aspire to be betr 
ter teachers. We will miss him greatly. 

Dr. Bruce Burnett has been hired to fill the chemistry 
position. We look forward to working with Dr. Burnett and 
are anxious to share in the enthusiasm he brings to the 
position. 

In our never-ending efforts to keep our curriculum up 
to date and relevant, the vast majority of the science 
teachers have been attending workshops and seminars 
throughout this past year. One such workshop was a three 
week biotechnology program offered by the chemistry and 
field studies departments of the University of Lowell. John 
Prescott, Donald Parkhurst, Andy Sorenson and Michael 
Tate represented Chelmsford at this exceptional program. 
Our curriculum was enriched by several laboratory exer- 
cises as a result of their efforts. 



75 



We continue our relationship with the University of 
Lowell via the two-way television program. We hope to 
expand the program so as to involve as many of the students 
as possible. 

Thank you for your support. 



department finished third for the Dalton Trophy as the 
most winning program in all of Division I. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH 

(GRADES K-12) 

Health education came to the forefront this past year 
with various curriculum innovations, updates, and 
workshops. At CHS a junior/senior health elective was 
begun as a supplement to the ninth grade health program. 
In October, a series of workshops on contemporary health 
topics entitled "Equipped for the Future" presented by 
Harvard Community Health clinicians was attended by 352 
high school students. 

A new eighth grade health program was initiated this 
year in order to provide continuity between the current 
seventh and ninth grade health programs. Additionally at 
McCarthy, two parent workshops were presented to sup- 
port the seventh grade "Skills for Adolescence" health cur- 
riculum. On November 15th, another successful "Great 
American Smoke Out" program was conducted. 

Last spring "Growing Healthy," an interdisciplinary, 
hands on, comprehensive health education program, was 
adopted at the elementary level. This fall grade level 
workshops were conducted for teachers in grades 3,4, and 
5 as the first stage of the curriculum phase in. Follow up 
workshops have been scheduled for March. Next fall 
"Growing Healthy" will be phased into grades K, 1 , and 2. 

Numerous drug/alcohol related educational materials 
were acquired this past year for grades K-12 through the 
Governor's Alliance Against Drugs Grant Program. 

The health and physical education departments, com- 
bined for the first time this year, share the common goal 
of educating our students in the development of healthy 
and active lifestyles. Our goal this year will be to explore 
ways to work together toward this end. 



FROM THE PROGRAM 

SUPERVISOR FOR ATHLETICS 

(GRADES 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department dur- 
ing the 1989-90 school year fielded 28 varsity teams, 13 
junior varsity teams, 1 sophomore team, and 7 freshman 
teams. An overall record from 337 varsity contests was 
230-98-9 with a total of 983 athletes competing. The 



GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

Post Secondary Education Placements 

In 1990, there were 399 graduates. Of those graduates, 
342 went on to post-secondary education which represents 
86%. 



4 year colleges 


288 


(72%) 


2 year colleges 


38 


(10%) 


technical schools 


16 


(4% ) 




342 


86% 



In terms of non-educational placements, 47 students 
elected employment, seven joined the military, one student 
planned marriage, one was undecided and one student 
joined the American Field Service program. 

Advanced Placement Program 

In May of 1990, 98 students took 184 Advanced Place- 
ment examinations at Chelmsford High School with 85 % 
of the grades falling in the 3-5 range. The program grades 
on a five-point college-level scale: 

5— extremely well qualified 

4— well qualified 

3 — qualified 

2 — possibly qualified 

1 — no recommendation 

Generally, AP grades of 4 and 5 are comparable to col- 
lege grades of A and grades of 3 and 2 most comparable 
to college grades of B and C, respectively. Many colleges 
will award a third to a full year of placement and credit 
to successful AP candidates. 

Drop Out Rate: 

The drop out rate at Chelmsford High School continues 
to be low. During the 1989-90 academic year, CHS had a 
total student enrollment of 1564. The number of drop outs 
was 14, which represents a drop out rate of .9%. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1989-90 










Req. to 


Voluntary 






Employment 


Leave 


Withdrawal 


Total 


Boys 


3 


1 


6 


23 


Girls 


1 





3 


4 


Total 


4 


1 


9 


14 



76 



Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores (SAT) 

Chelmsford High School average scores for the Class of 
1990 continue to be higher than the average Massachusetts 
and National scores. 

In the verbal area, Chelmsford scored 458 which is 31 
points higher than the State average (427) and 34 points 
higher than the National average (424). 

In the math area, Chelmsford scored 509 which is 36 
points higher than the State average (473) and 33 points 
higher than the National average (476). 

Service Study and Career Exploration Programs 

In the 1989-90 academic year, 130 students enrolled in 
ten Service Study and Career Exploration programs. 

The Service Study Program is a voluntary elective design- 
ed to combine practical experience with the students' 
academic studies as they use their free time to pursue an 
area similar to their chosen field. There is an opportunity 
for students to assist our athletic trainer and there are 
several programs designed for students who are interested 
in working with special needs children. Approximately 140 
job postings were available to the students as employment 
counseling was added to the Service Study Program as well 
as the Career Center opportunities. 

The Career Explorations Program gives an opportunity 
to all students to supplement their schedule and gain in- 
sight and experience as they volunteer to work as an assis- 
tant in our offices, library, science lab, television studio, 
or graphic arts. 

Scheduling for these programs is flexible and the elec- 
tives may be taken for one semester or the entire year. All 
students are placed in their preferred area and credits are 
distributed according to the number of periods they work, 
their performance and attendance. 

Career Center 

The Chelmsford High School Career Center continues 
to be a model for student awareness of college, vocational 
and career information. Students and parents use this 
facility for college search, occupations, descriptions and 
various career options, employment and also as a study 
area. 

The following events took place in the Career Center 
from September 1989 to June 1990: 

141 college representatives and speakers were hosted 
30 Chelmsford High School Alumni participated 
in Reverse College Day 

140 Job Postings were available to students 

Various military personnel visited the Center 
during the school year 

Counselors and teachers brought classes and 
homerooms to introduce students to the facility 

The annual Job Fair was held in the Career 



Center in May and Personnel Officers from over 
20 companies attended. 

The Career Center is stocked with up-to-date college 
catalogues, college applications and financial aid informa- 
tion. Additionally, computers and Video Cassette Recorders 
are available to search for colleges, job descriptions, finan- 
cial aid and scholarships. 

The Career Center is open from 7:25 a.m. until 1:50 
p.m. for students, parents, and the Chelmsford community 
at large. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF PRACTICAL ARTS 7-12 

September of 1990 saw the change from three depart- 
ment heads for the areas of Business Education, Home 
Economics, and Technology Education to one department 
head for the area of Practical Arts (which includes Business 
Education, Home Economics, and Technology Education). 
This new position has been a very challenging one for me 
because I had to become more familiar with the various 
curricula areas. The challenge continues as I am still lear- 
ning Sewing, Cooking, understanding Early Childhood 
Development, Accounting, Fashion Merchandising and 
others. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Business Department presently has five staff 
members with expertise in a wide range of Business and 
Distributive Education subject areas. Subjects taught are 
Introduction to Business, Typing, Speedwriting, Accoun- 
ting, Business Records, Word Processing, Introduction to 
BASIC, Fashion Merchandising, and Marketing. For the 
1990-1991 school year a change was made in the Typing 
curriculum in which typing was changed from a full year 
class to a semester class. This was done to allow more 
students to elect to take Typing backed up to another 
semester course in the Business area or another discipline. 

1990 represented an outstanding year for the Marketing 
classes at C.H.S. Fifty-eight students participated in the 
District competition with five students placing First, four 
students placing Second, five students placing Third, and 
twelve students receiving a Certificate of Merit for plac- 
ing in the top eight. This allowed Chelmsford to send from 
the original 58 students, thirty-one students to the State 
Competition. They competed against students from seventy 
other schools in the state. During the State Competition, 
Chelmsford placed nine students in the top awards of First, 
Second, or Third Place thus qualifying for the National 
Competition in San Jose, California. Chelmsford ranked 
2nd in its standings of State Finalists. At the National Com- 
petition, Chelmsford's nine students were among the ap- 
proximately 8,000 students and advisors to represent the 
50 States, District of Columbia, Canada, Puerto Rico, the 
Virgin Islands, and Guam. One student received First 
Place, and two students received a Certificate of Merit for 
their hard work and devotion to the Marketing Program 
at Chelmsford High School.. 



77 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The goal of the Home Economics Department is to pro- 
vide students in grades 7 through 12 with practical life 
skills. Because both parents are often working, or single 
parent families exist, there is a need for young people to 
accept responsibility at an early age. 

Home Economics begins at the 7th and 8th grade level 
with a 10 week program that introduces both goys and girls 
to the basic skills in cooking, sewing, consumerism, and 
decision making. The curriculum continues with electives 
at the High Shool that include Foods courses, Family Liv- 
ing, Sewing, and Child Development. The Early Childhood 
Education Program, using the Community Education 
sponsored Pre-School as a laboratory for the high school 
students, continues to be sucessful. Some of our students 
continued their education in this field, as more care giv- 
ing services are needed. Education for child care and 
parenting will become more important in the next decade. 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

Students at the McCarthy Middle School enjoy the 
designing and construction of a race car and the design 
and construction of a dream house. Although every stu- 
dent has Technology Education classes for only one quarter 
of the school year, they seem to benefit from the class and 
receive a great deal of insight into the World of Technology 
that is just ahead for them. 

This year saw a special award offered to Mr. Michael 
Cerullo, one of the teachers at the McCarthy Middle 
School. T.E.A.M. (Technology Education Association of 
Massachusetts) honored Mr. Cerullo as the Outstanding 
Teacher of Technology Education from the state of Mass- 
achusetts. Michael is well deserving of this award and was 
given the opportunity to represent our state at the National 
Convention. Congratulations, Mike. 

Grades 9-12 saw a reduction in the number of course 
opportunities for the students to choose from and the 
courses remaining, saw a significant increase in class size. 

Courses offered in the Technology Education Depart- 
ment include: 



GENERAL DRAFTING 
ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 
FINE FURNITURE 
CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL WELDING 



TECHNICAL DRAWING 
ANALOG ELECTRONICS 
TECH. ED. EXPLORATORY 
HOUSE CONSTRUCTION 
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR 



It is my hope that parents will research these courses and 
encourage their daughters and sons to sign up and take 
a few of these courses while at C.H.S. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(GRADES 7-12) 

The Foreign Language program in Chelmsford con- 
tinued to be very strong during 1989-90. Even inspite of 
declining enrollments, we have seen an increase over the 
past years in the percentage of students studying a foreign 
language. During 1989-90, approximately 68% of CHS 
students and 51 % of McCarthy students were involved in 
our program. 

We continued to work on updating the course curricula 
and streamlining the course sequences in Spanish and 
French. Three teachers received a Horace Mann grant to 
work on the level I curriculum. As of September 1991, the 
courses at McCarthy will be called Spanish I and II, and 
French I and II. When the students enter CHS they will 
continue with a level III Spanish or French course. 

The extra curricular activities usually sponsored at CHS 
by the Foreign Language Department were all offered, ex- 
cept for the Foreign Language Club. The German, French, 
Spanish, and Italian Exchanges continued, and the French 
and Spanish Honor Societies again held their inductions 
in the spring. Outstanding senior Spanish, French and 
Latin language students were recognized at the Academic 
Awards Night in May. At McCarthy, Mrs. Deschenes' an- 
nual trip to Quebec was enjoyed by all students who 
participated. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR FINE ARTS 

The Fine Arts Department has much to be proud of — 
there are many high school students who have attained 
remarkable success. Their success is possible because of the 
strong foundation that has been built in the elementary 
schools. It is here that basic concepts and skills are taught 
while children are introduced to the sense of personal 
satisfaction and accomplishment that is an essential pro- 
duct of creative education. A strong art and music cur- 
riculum addresses aspects of developmental growth and 
whole-brain thinking that would not otherwise be fully ex- 
plored. Every child gains valuable skills when our fine and 
performing arts program supports and enhances regular 
classroom learning. 

This learning process becomes more sophisticated at the 
Middle School, and by High School, students have an op- 
portunity to discover and refine individual strengths and 
talents. Rich and varied course offerings make this possi- 
ble. While every student who elects art and music will gain 
from this experience, some will discover that indeed they 
can excel. The art department is well represented in both 
the Boston Globe Show and Art All-State; the instrumen- 
tal, strings and choral programs have many students per- 
forming in district, regional, All-State and All-Eastern 
competitions. Pride in these accomplishments is shared by 
all dedicated teachers who have taught and supported these 
students. 



78 



Chelmsford Public Schools maintains its reputation of 
providing an outstanding fine arts education when students 
are recognized in competitive exhibitions and perfor- 
mances. Our commitment to teach art and music from 
kindergarden through grade twelve reflects a dedication 
to excellence in all areas of education. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES (GRADES 6-8) 

The department began with a series of activities regar- 
ding the Middle East. Later, letters were written to the 
troops, some classes sent materials. A holiday video was 
produced by Team 2 that involved the whole school. Elec- 
tion 90 was covered in many classes and the culminating 
activity was a mock election using actual ballots and our 
own ballot box which was donated to McCarthy by the 
Town Clerk. The National Geography Bee will take place 
in January. Students will participate in National History 
Day and their own News Quiz. The 8th grade has piloted 
texts and hope to incorporate one in the next fiscal year. 
Geoffrey Hall, a U.S. history teacher for 17 years was 
elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE (GRADES 6-8) 

The major goal of the science curricula, grades six 
through eight, is to develop in the students the skills of 
scientific investigation which involves not only measure- 
ment and laboratory techniques but also problem-solving 
situations. To accomplish this goal, the science teachers 
employ a variety of techniques which involve notetaking 
along with the keeping of a notebook, audio- visuals, oral 
exercises, laboratory activities and homework. These 
techniques are used to develop organizational, listening, 
critical thinking and research skills. The sixth grade con- 
tent involves units in the life, earth and physical sciences 
as well as health and environmental education, while the 
seventh grade curriculum stresses the life sciences and the 
eighth grade program involves geology, astronomy, 
meteorology and oceanography. 

During the 1990-91 school year, the science staff, in ad- 
dition to their regular classwork has been active with 1) 
piloting and evaluating textbooks for updated text selec- 
tions, 2) revising curricula, 3) planning outdoor education 
trips and 4) attending workshops on new technology and 
grants. 



Merrimack Valley and in the contest sponsored by the 
Chelmsford Emblem Club. The writing talents of our 
students were also showcased in the Team II Tidbits, a 
weekly newsletter to parents, and in our school literary 
magazine. Also, in order to share stories they had written 
for a young audience, several seventh grade authors and 
their teachers went on a field trip to Harrington School 
first grades. In addition, several classes were able to take 
advantage of the various area theater offerings such as Les 
Miserables. Finally, we have been able to continue to up- 
date some of our texts and materials and to involve more 
teachers and classes in the computerlab. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF MATHEMATICS (GRADES 6-8) 

Although scores on the Massachusetts Educational 
Assessment Program indicate a solid mathematics pro- 
gram, the mathematics department at McCarthy Middle 
School continue to evaluate the curriculum goals relative 
to the Curriculum and Evaluation Standards published by 
the National Council of Mathematics Teachers. During the 
past years the teachers have put new emphasis on problem 
solving strategies and each month more than 700 students 
are taking part in the Continental Math League Competi- 
tion. In June '90, Mr. Robert Germann's sixth grade team 
was awarded first place in the national competition and 
team members Erika Black, Julie Lisavich and Gregory 
Rideout recognized for perfect scores. 

Members of the mathematics department strive not on- 
ly to meet the needs of all students but also to challenge 
each individual to fulfill his or her potential. Advanced 
courses in algebra and geometry are offered and one hun- 
dred forty-two students currently participate in these ac- 
celerated programs. Development of good computational 
skills is encouraged at all levels as well as appropriate use 
of calculators. Students have been asked to provide their 
own calculator. 

The mathematics department has also tried to recognize 
students with special interest and ability in mathematics. 
This yeare Melissa Fay was awarded the Robert 
McCullough Mathematics Trophy. 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH (GRADES 6-8) 

The McCarthy Language Arts Department had a very 
busy year. Monique Dumont, the eighth grade winner of 
our school spelling bee, went on to win the Lowell Sun 
Spelling Bee. Also, several of our students did very well in 
various writing contests; for example, we came in first in 
the esssay contest sponsored by the Elder Services of the 



Massachusetts' Chapter 766 and the Federal Govern- 
ment's Public Law 94-142, the Education of Handicap- 
ped Children Act, were enacted to assure that all handicap- 
ped children have a free and appropriate education to be 
provided by the local community. 

The Special Education Department in Chelmsford is 
responsible for providing effective programs and services 
for children, ages three through twenty-one, who are found 
to have special needs. 



79 



Part of this responsibility is to assure that each handicap- 
ped student receives an education designed to meet his or 
her unique learning needs and to receive the services in 
the least restrictive environment. 

As of December 1, 1990 the Special Education Depart- 
ment had 847 students registered to receive special educa- 
tion services, which represents 16.6 percent of Chelmsford's 
total school enrollment. 

A staff of seventy-one special education personnel 
develop and implement the individualized educational 
plans for these students. For those students with severe lear- 
ning and/or emotional needs, Chelmsford provides for 
placement in private day or residential schools as approv- 
ed by the State Department of Education. 

For the 1990-1991 school year, the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department has a budget of $3,734,437, of 
which $285,809. is provided through grants by the federal 
government. 

The Special Education Department will continue its 
quest to provide effective and cost efficient programs and 
services for the children we serve. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

Since 1981, when the School Department started its own 
in-house computerization effort, all major school business 
related applications have been automated on our computer 
systems. These systems include a DEC 11/44, VAX 750, 
and various microcomputers. In-house staff now maintain 
all data bases on students, accounting, personnel, census, 
scheduling, attendance, report cards and a plethora of 
other applications. 

Other town departments serviced in some way by the 
school computer include: Town Clerk, Council on Aging, 
Town Candidates for Office, Town Library, Selectmen's 
School Warrant Report, Community Education, PTA, 
Booster Club, Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational 
School, Police Department, Commission on Handicapped, 
Sewer Commission and Planning Board. 

Future involvements will revolve around networking 
computers, data communications and telecommunications. 
Technical obstacles to these formidable endeavors are be- 
ing evaluated and have the potential to significantly in- 
crease the productivity of the schools. Unfortunately, with 
the town's reduced Local Aid the School Computer Depart- 
ment is trying to keep its head above the waters of fiscal 
reductions. 



During the 1989-1990 school year, Chelmsford has seen 
an increase in self supporting programs. Community 
Education Childcare Services, Adult Education Courses, 
and Summer School have continued to provide services to 
the Community on a tuition/user fee basis. 

Childcare Services include a Preschool Program at 
Chelmsford High School, Full Day Kindergarten, and Ex- 
tended Day Services for school age children 7:00 a.m. -6:00 
p.m., Vacation/Snow Days and a Ten Week Summer 
Camp. 

Adult Education continues to offer Fall, Winter and 
Spring sessions and is an extension campus for Nor- 
theastern University and Middlesex Community College. 
Summer School administers both remedial and enrichment 
programs to approximately 600 students in grades 2-adult. 

Our Out-of-Town tuition program attracted over 30 
students from surrounding communities and this past year 
refunded $67,000.00 to the regular school budget. 

Community Education is pleased to offer these services 
to the Chelmsford Community on a self supporting basis. 
Continued growth is expected for 1990-1991. Brochures 
listing all courses and programs are mailed to all homes 
during August, January, and March. 



IN CONCLUSION: 

Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town of- 
ficials and boards, to the school personnel, to the parents, 
teacher organizations, to the many advisory committees, 
to the School Improvement Councils, school volunteer 
workers, and to the citizens for their cooperation and 
assistance this past year. 

The School Committee wishes to extend its deep ap- 
preciation to the following staff members for their years 
of loyal and meritorious service and who have retired this 
past year: 

William F. Mullin— Superintendent of Schools 

Dorothy M. Woodharas— Assistant Superintendent 

Thomas J. Carroll — Director, Math-Science-Budget 

Evelyn Desmarais— Principal at Harrington School 

Natalie 0. Jones— Administrative Assistant 

Elizabeth Donovan— Secretary in the Administration Office 

Lucille Bean— Teacher at Parker School 

Robert J. Caton— Maintenance Supervisor 

Phyllis Clark— Teacher at South Row School 

Janet M. Clement — Instructional E.S.P. at Parker School 

Marion E. Hickey— Teacher at Westlands School 

Mildred LaRock-E.S.P. at Westlands School 

Elinor P. Lynch— Teacher at McCarthy Middle School 

George Martin— Custodian at Byam School 

Sylvia J. Ostman- Teacher at McCarthy Middle School 

Patricia A. Phaneuf- Teacher at South Row School 

Jacqueline Roberts— Teacher at Chelmsford High School 



80 



In Memoriam 

The Community and the School Department were 
grieved by the deaths of Robert Comrie, Custodian at the 
Byam School and Leroy Fielding, Security Guard. They 
will be long rememberd for their dedicated service to the 
school system and their devotion to the children of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 



81 



CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 




Rear: Richard Day, Jeffrey Brem and Robert Joyce. Front: Barry Balan, Chairman and John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman. 



82 



REPORT OF THE SEWER COMMISSION 

The Chelmsford Sewer commission underwent restruc- 
turing in 1990 due to the new town charter. First, the Com- 
mission was expanded to five members. Newly-elected com- 
missioners Richard Day and Jeffrey Brem have added their 
knowledge and professional expertise to the Commission. 
In addition, Barry Balan was elected chairman after serv- 
ing five years as vice-chairman. 

Second, overall sewer system responsibilities have been 
redefined. The Commission's role is now focused on the 
design and construction of new projects. The Department 
of Public Works is now responsible for building connec- 
tions, pipeline and pump station operation and 
maintenance, sewer user fees, etc. 

In 1990, construction efforts shifted to residential 
neighborhoods in Chelmsford Center and South 
Chelmsford. With the completion of trunk interceptor 
sewers and main pumping stations in 1989, the Commis- 
sion concentrated its efforts on extending lateral sewers to 
those residential areas identified by the wastewater facilities 
plan as having the greatest need for municipal sewers. 

As part of the phased program approved by voters in 
1989, the future areas to be sewered include neighborhoods 
with failing septic systems, septic systems which cannot be 
repaired due to poor soils and/or high groundwater, and 
those within the drinking water aquifer. 

Construction was intense in the Kinsington Drive Area 
and the Golden Cove Road Area, to neighborhoods within 
the Aquifer Protection District. Contracts were awarded 
in 1990 for three lateral contracts in South Chelmsford to 
service the Old Stage Area, Farms II Area, and the 
Domenic Drive Area, areas with major septic system and 
soil problems. 







Start/Finish 




% Complete 


Project Name 


Contractor 


Date 


Bid Amount 


12/31/90 


Kensington Drive Area DiGregorio Const. Co. 


6/89-7/91 


$2,590,606 


87% 


(Contract 88-2) 










Golden Cove Road 


Albanese Bros.. Inc. 


11/89-6/91 


8868,051 


94% 


Area (Contract 88-3) 










Old Stage Area 


Albanese Bros., Inc. 


11/90-11/92 


$2,844,481 


4% 


(Contract 892) 










Farms 11 Area 


Susi & DiMascio Co.. Inc. 


3/91-12/91 


81,090,089 


0% 


(Contract 89-3) 










Domenic Drive Area 


Tom Gioioso Const. Co. 


12/90-6/92 


81,680,184 


6% 


(Contract 89-4) 











ted to the maximization of all potentially available state 
and federal financial assistance. 

In addition to final overlay paving in the Chelmsford 
Center Area, the other major sewer construction project 
in 1990 encompassed a private sewer extension on Littleton 
Road. This project, designed and constructed entirely with 
private monies, was granted limited flow in late 1990. Upon 
completion of building service connections, testing and 
final paving in 1991, additional connections and flow will 
be permitted. 

It has been the unanimous position of the Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission that revenues collected from sewer bet- 
terment assessments and privilege fees should only be us- 
ed for their originally intended purpose, to retire the debt 
of the sewer project bonds. We will continue to reiterate 
our position on this matter at future town meetings. 

The Town Wide Drainage Facilities Plan draft report 
was completed in 1990. The Plan identified flooding areas 
and undersized culverts while recommending im- 
provements for each identified problem. As part of the 
study, the town received updated aerial photography and 
topographic mapping on both hard copy and in computer 
media for use by the town engineer's office. 

Residents are reminded that the Town By-Laws require 
connection to the public sewer within one year of the date 
the system in front of their property is approved for use. 



With the continued slowdown in the construction in- 
dustry, the 1990 bid prices were 32% lower than the 
original estimates. These prices proved to be even more 
competitive than the 1989 prices which were 26% lower 
than the original estimates. 

In June of 1990, the Commission received a 50% state 
grant for the Old Stage, Farms II, and Domenic Drive con- 
tracts and a 70% $3.3 million in state grant funding for 
these projects. Beginning in 1991, the state will replace the 
current grant programs with a new revolving loan program. 
All aspects of this program, have not, as of yet, been finaliz- 
ed. The Commission is carefully reviewing all components 
of this program as it is being drafted. We remain commit- 



83 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

TOWN MANAGER 

Bernard F. Lynch 
Appointed 9-11-89 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

James Pearson, Director 

Appointed 10-19-89 

Highway Division 

Michael Crory, Superintendent (Resigned 9-90) 

Bob Lloyd, Foreman 

Roy Costa, Foreman 

Engineering Division 

James Pearson, Town Engineer 

Recreation Commission 

Lorraine Murphy, Clerk 

Public Buildings Division 

Robert Deletetsky 

Parks Division 

Donald Gray, Superintendent (Retired 12-90) 

Edward Jamros, Grounds Keeper 

Sewer Division 
James Casparro, Superintendent 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Appointed by Moderator 
Brian R. Sullivan 9-92 

Myra Silver 1-92 

George Simonian 1-92 

Edward Marshall 10-92 

Cheryl Boss 11-93 

Ann Graham 11-93 

Dwight M. Hayward, Chairman 12-93 

William Logan (Resigned 12-90) 
Donald Elias (Resigned 10-90) 
Clerk Susan Olsen 

FIRE CHIEF 

Robert L. Hughes 

Dep. Chief: James Sousa 

Dep. Chief: Charles Galloway 

POLICE CHIEF 

Raymond McKeon 

Dep. Chief: Pennryn Fitts (Retired 12-90) 

Dep. Chief: James Greska 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Lorraine Leone — Oct. 1990 
(Replaced Ernest Day— retired August 1990) 



84 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FISCAL YEAR 1990— EXPENDITURES BY FUND 



DEPARTMENT 



GENERAL 


SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST & 


COMBINED 


FUND 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 


AGENCY 


TOTALS 


150,042 








150,042 


234,894 









234,894 














6,449 








6,449 


1,328 








1,348 














23,098 




30,813 





53,911 


295 








295 


15,301 








15,301 


24,824 


5,754 






30,578 


908,598 






801,143 


1,709,741 


1,450,701 








1,450,701 


49,537 








49,537 


77,466 








77,466 


3,417 








3,417 


1,567 








1,567 


1,263 








1,263 


131,900 








131,900 


687,799 


9,633 






697,432 


4,493 








4,493 


321 








321 


320 








320 


9,067 








9,067 


561 








561 


23,602 








23,602 


131,741 




187 




131,928 


37,132 








37,132 


150,734 


51,743 


64,086 





266,563 


122,676 








122,676 


4,005 








4,005 


254,868 








254,868 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Accounting 

Assessors 

Bills of Prior Years 

Board of Appeals 

Cable TV Commission 

Charter Commission 

Conservation Commission 

Constable 

Data Processing 

Elections 

Employee Benefits: 

Chapter 32B Insurance 

County Retirement Assessment 

Medicare Tax 

Unemployment Compensation 
Finance Committee 
Historic District Commission 
Historical Commission 
Law 

Liability Insurance 
Medical — Retired Police/Fire 
Mobile Home Rent Control 
Moderator 
NMAC Assessment 
Personnel Board 
Planning Board 
Public Buildings 
Registrars 
Town Manager 
Town Clerk 
Town Reports 
Treasurer 

Total General Government 

PUBLIC SAFETY: 

Dog Officer 

Emergency Management 

Fire 

Insect Pest Control 

Inspection 

Police 

Sealer Weights & Measures 

Traffic & Safety Committee 

Tree Warden 

Total Public Safety 

EDUCATION: 

Public Schools 
Nashoba Regional Tech HS 
Total Education 

PUBLIC WORKS: 

Highway 
Street Lighting 
Town Engineer 

Total Public Works 

HEALTH & SANITATION 

Animal Inspector 
Board of Health 
Lowell Mental Health 
Sewer Commission 
Waste Collection 

Total Health & Sanitation 



4,508,019 


67,130 


95,086 


801,143 


5,471,378 


27,708 








27,708 


2,289 








2,289 


2,902,952 




216,151 




3,119,103 


6,227 








6,227 


213,523 








213,523 


2,689,943 




38,566 


787,385 


3.515,894 


2,195 








2,195 


13,597 




1,751 




15,348 


8,404 








8,404 


5,866,838 





256,468 


787,385 


6.910,691. 


20.986,627 


2,184,074 


407,406 




23,578,107 


600,812 








600,812 


21,587,439 


2,184.074 


407,406 





24,178,919 


1.600,280 


100,163 


322,648 




2,023,091 


135,006 








135,006 


99,960 








99,960 


1,835,246 


100.163 


322,648 





2,258,057 


1,400 








1.400 


182,254 


5,981 


46,740 




234,975 


8,695 








8,695 


254,749 


578,797 


6,975.610 




7,809,156 


1.480,813 








1.480.813 


1,927,911 


584,778 


7,022,350 





9.535,039 



85 



HUMAN SERVICES: 

Cemetery 

Commission on Handicapped 

Council on Aging 

Elder Services of Mer. Valley 

Sr. Citizen Center 

Veterans Benefits 



219,848 





14,000 


285 






115,081 


26,598 





1,800 











1,254,639 


109,109 







233,848 

285 

141,679 

1,800 

1,254,639 

109,109 



Total Human Services 


446,123 


26,598 


1,268,639 





1,741,360 


CULTURE AND RECREATION: 












Cultural Council 


28 


16,301 






16,329 


Holiday Decorating Comm. 


250 








250 


Library 


721,100 


22,691 


48,899 


339 


792,029 


Memorial Day 


1,000 








1,000 


Park 


42,277 








42,277 


Recreation Commission 


79,672 


8,695 


3,061 




91,428 


Town Celebration 


1,151 









1,151 


Varney Playground 














Total Culture & Recreation 


845,478 


47,687 


50,960 


339 


944,464 


MATURING DEBT & INTEREST: 












Principal Payments 


2,900.000 








2,900,000 


Interest Payments 


1,729,731 




332 




1,730,063 


Total Debt & Interest 


4,629,731 





332 





4,630,063 


STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS: 












County 


32,741 








32,741 


State 


154,126 








154,126 


Total Assessments 


186,867 











186,867 


Total Expenditures 


$41,833,652 


53,010,430 


$9,423,889 


$1,588,867 


$55,856,838 



FISCAL YEAR 1990— REVENUE BY FUND 





GENERAL 


SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST & 


COMBINED 


DEPARTMENT 


FUND 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 


AGENCY 


TOTALS 


Property Tax 


26,892,673 








26,892,673 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 


1,878,530 








1,878,530 


Farm Animal Excise Tax 


402 








402 


Hotel-Motel Excise Tax 


160,441 








160,441 


Interest— Property Taxes 


165,194 








165,194 


Intergovernmental — State 


10,069,817 


1,080,934 






11,150,751 


Intergovernmental — Federal 




989,382 






989,382 


Fees 


106,958 








106,958 


Rentals 


111,763 








111,763 


Departmental 


411,732 


2,268,550 




851,599 


3,531,881 


Licenses and Permits 


368,925 








368,925 


Fines and Forfeits 


43,967 








43,967 


Investment Income 


471,034 


6,152 




133,770 


610,956 


Lowell Regional Transit 


27,626 








27,626 


Misc. 


9,424 








9,424 


Total Revenue 


40,718,486 


4,345,018 





985,369 


46,048,873 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCE: 












Bond Proceeds 






8,983,823 




8,983,823 


Operating Transfers In 


144,254 








977,550 


1,121,804 


Operating Transfers Out 


(977,550) 


(36,297) 




(107,957) 


(1,121,804; 


Total Other Finance Source 


(833,296) 


(36,297) 


8,983,823 


869,593 


8,983,823 


Total Revenue and Other Financing Source 


39,885,190 


4,308,721 


8,983,823 


1,854,962 


55,032,696 


Excess of Revenues Over Expenditures 


($1,948,462) 


$1,298,291 


($440,066) 


$266,095 


($824,142] 



86 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND TRUST & AGENCY FUNDS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1990 



REVENUES: 

Property Taxes 
Intergovernmental 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 
Investment Income 
Departmental 

Total Revenues 
EXPENDITURES: 

General Government 
Public Safety 
Education 
Public Works 
Human Services 
Culture and Recreation 
Maturing Debt and Interest 
State and County Assessments 
Total Expenditures 

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
Over Expenditures 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 

Bond Proceeds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 

Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources Over 
Expenditures and Other Uses 

Fund Balance at Beginning of Year 
Fund Balance at End of Year 





SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST AND 


MEMORANDUM 


GENERAL 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 


AGENCY 


ONLY) 


$26,892,673 


- 


- 


- 


$26,892,673 


10,069,817 


2,070,316 


— 


- 


12,140,133 


1,878,530 


— 


— 


— 


1,878,530 


471,034 


6,152 


— 


133,770 


610,956 


1,406,432 


2,268,550 
4,345,018 


- 


851,599 
985,369 


4,526,581 


40,718,486 


- 


46,048,873 


4,415,120 


105,178 


96,650 


801,143 


5,418,091 


5,838,611 





254,718 


787,385 


6,880,714 


21,587,439 


2,184,076 


407,406 


— 


24,178,921 


3,979,304 


640,915 


7,209,096 


— 


11,829,315 


418,339 


32,580 


1,286,795 


— 


1,737,714 


805,812 


47,229 


47,899 


338 


901,278 


4,633,307 


— 


- 


- 


4,633,307 


186,867 


- 


- 


- 


186,867 


41,864,799 


3,009,978 


9,302,564 


1,588,866 


55,766,207 


(1,146,313) 


1,335,040 


(9,302,564) 


(603,497) 


(9,717,334) 






8,983,823 




8,983,823 


144,254 





— 


977,550 


1,121,804 


(977,550) 


(36,297) 
(36,297) 


- 


(107,957) 
869,593 


(1,121,804) 


(833,296) 


8,983,823 


8,983,823 


(1,979,609) 


1,298,743 


(318,741) 


266,096 


(733,511) 


3,118,955 


880,057 


5,133,302 


1,670,271 


10,802,585 


$1,139,346 


$2,178,800 


$4,814,561 


$1,936,367 


$10,069,074 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET— ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUP 

JUNE 30, 1990 



Cash and Temporary Investments 

Property Taxes Receivable: 
Fiscal Year 1991 
Fiscal Year 1990 
Fiscal Year 1989 

Accounts Receivable: 
Intergovernmental : 

Commonwealth of Mass. 



GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 



FIDUCIARY ACCOUNT 
FUND TYPE GROUP 











GENERAL 


TOTALS 




SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST AND 


LONG-TERM 


(MEMORAN- 


GENERAL 


REVENUE 

$1,877,215 


PROJECTS 

56,642,962 


AGENCY 

$2,036,135 


DEBT 


DUM) ONLY) 


($3,346,048) 


- 


$7,210,264 


14,299,040 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


14,299.040 


2,167,711 


— 


- 


— 


— 


2,167,711 


18,359 


— 


— 


" 




18,359 


5,112,914 


329,968 


1,132,412 




_ 


6,575,294 



87 



Other Accounts Receivable: 
Motor Vehicle Excise: 

Current Year 

Prior Years 
Farm Animal Excise 
Tax Title 
Departmental 
DEF Tax CH59 CL41A 

Tax Foreclosures 

Due from (to) Other Funds 

Amount to be Provided for 
Payment of Notes 

Amount to be Provided for 

Retirement of General Long-Term Debt 

Total Assets 
LIABILITIES: 



170,112 

83,104 

327 

550,379 

7,058 

92,379 

30,412 

(4,900) 



(3,987) 



$2,203,196 



8,442,823 



$2,092,146 



$18,160,000 



170,112 
83,104 
327 
550,379 
54,182 
92,379 

30,412 





$57,854,386 



Accounts Payable 

Payroll Withholdings 

Other Liabilities 

Deferred Revenue 

Reserve for Abatements and Exemptions 

Notes Payable 

Bonds Payable 

Total Liabilities 

FUND EQUITY: 

Reserved: 

Encumbrances 

Appropriation Deficit 

Over Assessments 

Endowments 
Unreserved: 

Designated 

Undesignated 

Total Fund Equity 

Total Liabilities and Fund Equity 



$480,090 

175,441 

39,089 

17,344,902 

73,979 



$24,396 



24,396 11,403,636 



18,160,000 



$601,954 

175,441 

39,089 

17,392,026 

73,979 

11,342,823 

18,160,000 

47,785,312 



865,848 

(414,097) 

(1,990) 


- 


" 


- 


" 


865,848 

(414,097; 

(1,990) 




17,596 

671,989 


2,178,800 


4,814,561 


1,936,367 


" 


8,947,324 
671,989 


1,139,346 


2,178,800 
$2,203,196 


4,814,561 
$16,218,197 


1,936,367 
$2,092,146 


- 


10,069,074 


$19,180,847 


$18,160,000 


$57,854,386 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

GENERAL FUND 

SCHEDULE OF TAXES RECEIVABLE 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1990 



1991 
1990 
1989 



UNCOLLECTED 

TAXES 

JULY 1, 1989 


COMMITMENTS 


LESS 

ABATEMENTS 

AND 

ADJUSTMENTS 


LESS 

TRANSFERS 

TO 

TAX TITLE 


LESS 

NET 

COLLECTIONS 


UNCOLLECTED 

TAXES 

JUNE 30, 1990 


$0 



1,360,565 


$14,299,040 

28,448,057 



$42,747,097 


$0 

313,880 

182,896 

$496,776 


$0 



374,116 

$374,116 


$0 

25,985,249 

789,886 


$14,299,040 

2,148,928 

13,667 


$1,360,565 


$26,775,135 


$16,461,635 



Personal Property 



1990 
1989 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

1990 
1989 
1988 
1987 



Farm Animal Excise 



1990 
1989 






464,689 


2,344 





443,562 


18,783 


9,227 




464,689 


848 






3,687 
447,249 


4,692 


9,227 


3,192 


23,475 


SI, 369, 792 


S43.211.786 


S499.968 


S374.116 


S27.222.384 


S16.485.110 





1,500,206 


70,315 





1,259,779 


170,112 


157,066 


452,587 


28,795 





533,620 


47,238 


66,897 


52,496 


7,650 





75,877 


35,866 


41,136 





31,603 





9,533 





S265.099 


S2, 005, 289 


S138.363 


SO 


SI, 878, 809 


S253.216 





373 








46 


327 





356 








356 





SO 


S729 


SO 


SO 


S402 


S327 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

GENERAL FUND STATEMENT OF REVENUES, TRANSFERS, AVAILABLE FUNDS, EXPENDITURES 

AND PRIOR YEARS' DEFICITS RAISED— BUDGET AND ACTUAL 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1990 



REVENUES: 

Real and Personal Property Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Intergovernmental 
Investment Income 
Departmental 

Total Revenues 
EXPENDITURES: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Education 
Public Works 
Human Services 
Culture and Recreation 
Maturing Debt and Interest 
State and County Assessments 

Total Expenditures 

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
Over Expenditures 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 
Transfer from Fund Balance 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 
Prior Year Deficits Raised 

Total Other Financing Sources 
Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues and 
Other Financing Sources Over 
Expenditures and Other Uses 









VARIANCE 


ORIGINAL 


FINAL 




FAVORABLE 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


ACTUAL 


(UNFAVORABLE) 


S28,520,335 


S28,520,335 


S28,522,544 


S 2,209 


2,234.274 


2,234,274 


1,878,530 


(355,744) 


8,894,308 


8,894,308 


10,069,817 


1,175,509 


401,787 


401,727 


471.034 


69,307 


1,273,999 


1,273,999 
41,324,643 


1,406,387 
42,248,312 


132,388 


41,324,643 


1,023,669 


4,329,507 


4,559,759 


4,403,757 


156,002 


5,643.148 


5,893,148 


5,829,044 


64,104 


21,255,885 


21,790,885 


21,098,766 


692,119 


3,661,519 


3,765.269 


3,951,086 


(185,817) 


407,404 


407,404 


403,402 


4,002 


816,178 


816,178 


800,015 


16,163 


4,985,800 


4,985.800 


4,629.731 


356,069 


184,877 


184,877 


186,867 


(1,990) 


41,284,318 


42,403,320 
(1,078,677) 


41,302,668 


1,100,682 


40,325 


1,045,644 


2,124.321 


880,767 


1.983,472 


1.983,472 





85,000 


101,297 


101,297 





(977,550) 


(977,550) 


(977,550) 





(28,542) 


(28,542) 


(28,542) 





(40,325) 


1,078,677 


1,078,677 





S 


S 


S2, 124, 321 


S2.124.321 



89 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

JUNE 30, 1990 



CASH AND INVESTMENTS: 

In Custody of Treasurer SI, 760, 107 

In Custody of Library Trustees 151,220 

In Custody of Seslectmen 1,157 

In Custody of Veterans Emergency Fund Committee 14,998 



IN CUSTODY OF TREASURER: 

Geo. W. BarrisVarney Playground 
Wright Reservation 
Stablization Fund 
Insurance Sinking Fund 
Educational Collaborative 
Police Special Account 
Group Ins. Claims Chap. 32B 
Cemetery Funds: 

Geo. W. Barris Memorial 

Perpetual Care 

Adam Emerson 

Christopher Roby 

Vileata S. Douglas 

Baptist Pond Cemtery 

IN CUSTODY OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES: 

Amos F. Adams 

Geo. W. Barris 

Frances Clark 

Clement Fund 

Albert H. Davis 

Frederick B. Edwards 

Nathan B. Edwards 

Victor E. Edwards 

Adam Emerson 

Ora Flint 

George Memorial 

Thomas P. Proctor 

Serlina Richardson 

Joseph E. Warren 

Gertrude Wright 

Aaron George-Cemetery Fund 

Endowment Fund 



6,513 

28,755 

584,563 

74,652 

1,054 

2,608 

412,124 

11,399 

620,921 

1,507 

14,295 

266 

1,450 

1,760,107 



38,473 

326 

11,276 

38,255 

1,539 

5,244 

469 

2,556 

315 

2,015 

3,964 

26,263 

841 

359 

3,032 

3,634 

12,659 

151,220 



IN CUSTODY OF SELECTMEN: 

Emma GayVarney Playground 



IN CUSTODY OF VETERANS: 
EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE: 

Veterans Emergency Fund 



SI, 927,482 



90 



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91 



OFFICE OF 
THE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 

DEFT. MEMBERS: 

James R. Doukszewicz, Treasurer-Tax Collector/ 

Finance Director 
Carol R. Lambert, Asst. Treasurer 
Margaret M. Mullen, Dept. Asst. to Tax Collector 
Lorraine D. Parkhurst, Payroll Coordinator 
Bettie A. Osborne, Sr. Clerk-Accts. Payable/ Receivable 
Donna M. Rogers, Principal Clerk, Data Processing 
Judith A. Olsson, Part-time, Legal Document Prep. 

Dept. Notes: 

Commercial property foreclosures highlighted the year. 
There was substantial revenues due from real estate taxes 
assessed to commercial taxpayers. Some banks have taken 
title back from some of the property owners, and tax 
revenues are going to come in during 1991 calendar year 
for most of our commercial property foreclosures. 

Others are in Bankruptcy Court, and our tax liens can't 
be foreclosed until the Bankruptcy Court has finalized their 
proceedings. 

I anticipate placing tax liens against all taxpayers who 
have not paid the tax assessed against their property IN 
FULL for the tax year ending June 30, 1990. Such a pro- 
cess will begin in early 1991. This should further enhance 
our revenue picture as this process usually brings in the 
unpaid tax dollars within six months. 

Our largest commercial taxpayer has lagged behind in 
making tax payments, but he has paid his tax year 1990 
balances in full at this time. 

Revenues from excise taxes is down due to the sluggish 
economy. I do not anticipate an increase in this area of 
revenue for quite some time. We will be lucky if we realize 
receipts in 1991 of the same amount that we received in 
1990. 

Local aid through the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
is still very much up-in-the-air. We hope to get the same 
amount of state aid as we received last fiscal year. 



Sewer revenues are now coming in and will be used to 
offset the debt costs of the project, which were exempted 
from tax limits under prop. 2V6- This should lead to a 
stabilizing of tax debts for our homeowners, and the recent 
annual increases in taxes due to the debt of the sewer con- 
struction project should be marginal ones in the next several 
tax years. 

Staff work load has increased dramatically with the 
institution of the trash fee and quarterly tax billing. No 
increases in staff hours have been funded, making the peak 
periods horrendous, from an administrative and clerical 
point of view. Please be patient as cost effective measures 
are taken to reduce the costs associated with these areas 
of collection. 

Amounts associated with fixed costs, such as pension 
benefits, medical insurance benefits, liability insurance, 
State and County Assessments, sewer flow fees for the City 
of Lowell and maintenance costs for Duck Island Treat- 
ment Plant are all areas that we have little or no control 
over in our budget. Efforts are being made to curb elec- 
tricity and energy costs in our buildings and streetlighting 
programs. 

Growth in new properties has slowed to a trickle, and 
this adversely affects the revenue picture as well. 

The year 1990 saw many municipal service areas decreas- 
ed in personnel size, and hours of operation were curtailed 
in some service areas as a result. 

Citizen expectations for quality services in areas of educa- 
tion, road maintenance, trash collection, recycling, library 
programs, and senior citizen programs can only be satisfied 
with increased revenues. Old sources of annual revenue 
have been maximized in almost every area, but the shrink- 
ing economy has stagnated these sources or reduced their 
ability to fund municipal services to the extent that they 
used to do. Efforts to present sound reasoning and justifica- 
tion for overrides of prop. 2 V& are underway at this time. 
Many budgetary people feel the Town can not perform its 
services and required tasks in the public safety areas and 
education areas without increased revenue sources. An 
override of prop. 2V& for various aspects of municipal 
operations could be the proposed solution to the Town's 
fiscal woes! 



92 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Fire Department has continued to perform with the 
utmost professionalism during very severe budget times and 
cuts. We were reduced by four (4) men in 1990 cutting back 
the north station to only two men on duty at one time. This 
is definitely a step backward in fire protection to the town 
and to the increasing liabilities we face today. 

False alarms were cut substantially by implementation 
of a fine system to enhance repair of the many fire alarm 
and sprinkler systems we have now intact. The scope of this 
program seems to be doing the job it was intended to do. 

The Fire Department will strive to continue the present 
level of service to the townspeople and again I wish to thank 
everyone that has been involved and instrumental in enhan- 
cing the mission of the Chelmsford Fire Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert L. Hughes 
Fire Chief 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 



NAME 

Adley, Walter 
Anderson, Arthur 
Bennett, Robert 
Boermeester, J. 
Burke, Michael 
Cady, William 
Campbell, David 
Campbell, Wm. 
Carroll, John 
Cincevich, A. 
Clancy, David 
Clarke, Kevin 
Conlin, F.J. 
Conlin, Mark 
Curran, James 
Curran, Michael 



POSITION 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 



Curran, William 
Cutter, James 
Dalton, William 
DePalma, John 
Desaulnier, M.A. 
Donovan, Bruce 
Drew, Donald 
Durkin, James 
Flaherty, James 
Foster, Jesse 
Frobese, Ernest 
Galloway, Charles 
Goode, Terrance 
Grenon, Richard 
Griffin, Anna 
Hadley, David 
Hadley, William 
Hayes, Paul 
Henderson, Paul 
Hughes, Robert 
Jamer, William 
Johnson, Peter 
Keeley, James 
Keohane, Dennis 
Keohane, William 
Kydd, Raymond 
Magiera, Emil 
Martin, Leo 
McTeague, Mike 
Merrill, Leslie 
Miller, Richard 
Nolet, Edward 
O'Neil, Richard 
Reid, Daniel 
Reid, James 
Reid, John 
Ridlon, Michael 
Rivard, Arthur 
Schramm, Charles 
Sousa, James 
Spinazzola, Joseph 
Spinney, James 
Stanton, Brian 
Ubele, John D. 
Vaccaro, Anthony 
Vargeletis, Dennis 



Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Senior Clerk 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Deputy 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Junior Clerk 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Chief 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Mechanic 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Deputy 

Firefighter 

Captain 

Firefighter 

Firefighter 

Mechanic 

Firefighter 



93 



CHELMSFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS— 1990 



Totals 



80 



58 



M 



MA 



648 



645 



119 



63 



142 



Monthly 
Calls 



January 


8 


9 


45 


_ 


49 


5 


4 


18 


138 


February 


5 


4 


54 


— 


38 


3 


6 


12 


122 


March 


8 


4 


51 


— 


59 


17 


7 


17 


163 


April 


4 


7 


46 


— 


65 


17 


5 


10 


154 


May 


9 


3 


62 


— 


43 


12 


6 


15 


150 


June 


6 


3 


43 


4 


55 


8 


3 


13 


135 


July 


6 


1 


68 


1 


61 


16 


6 


15 


174 


August 


11 


6 


66 


— 


60 


7 


5 


13 


168 


September 


4 


2 


42 


— 


53 


3 


5 


15 


124 


October 


4 


6 


51 


1 


56 


6 


5 


3 


132 


November 


9 


7 


58 


1 


52 


14 


7 


4 


152 


December 


6- 


6 


62 


1 


54 


11 


4 


7 


150 



1,762 



FIRE DEPARTMENT CODES 



A— Auto Fire 
B — Building Fire 
M — Medical Assistance 
I — Investigation 



O — Outside Fire 
S — Service Call 
F— False Alarm 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review the Annual Report of the Police Department for the 
year 1990. 

At the present time, the department is made up of 50 
permanent officers. 

Chief of Police 

Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief 

James C. Greska 



Armand J. Caron 



Captains 

Phillip N. Molleur 
Sergeants 



John J. Mack 



Steven Bums 
Lance Cunningham 



James F Murphy 
John O. Walsh 



Raymond G. McCusker 

Department Criminal Prosecutor — 
Lowell District Court 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

Criminal Bureau 

Sergeant 

William R. McAllister 



James T. Finnegan 
Brian F. Mullen 



Inspectors 



Timothy F O'Connor 
Eugene W Walsh 



Drug/Alcohol Control Unit 

Sergeant 

Francis X. Roark 

Inspectors 

Jared S. Finnegan Roland E. Linstad 

Community Services & Safety Officer 
Patrick W. Daley 

Crime Prevention Officer 

Joseph R. Gamache 

Juvenile Officer 

Kenneth R. Duane 



Patrolmen 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
Paul E. Cooper 
Alan Cote 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
William J. Floyd 
Gail Hunter 
Francis P. Kelly 
Martin Krikorian 
Russell H. Linstad 
John C. McGeown 
Peter C. McGeown 
Debra Metcalf 



III 



James F Midgley 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
John E. Redican 
Paul Richardson 
Chandler J. Robinson 
E. Michael Rooney 
Michael M. Stott 
William S. Strobel 
Francis Teehan 
Robert Trudel 
Scott Ubele 
Robert Villare 
William R. Walsh 
Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 



94 



Matrons 



Tia Bevis 
Jo Cobleigh 
Barbara Ducharme 
Patricia Ducharme 



Mary Jo Fitton 
Donna Fox 
Karen Leonard 
Dawn O'Donnell 



Principal Clerks 

Marie K. DiRocco Karen M. Leonard 

Jo -Ann E. Molleur 

Senior Clerk 

Mary Jane Grant 

Civilian Dispatchers 

Barbara Ducharme Frederick Flynn 
Brian Fernald Frank Lane 

Part-Time Civilian Dispatchers 
Tia J. Bevis William J. Floyd, Jr. 

James C. Doherty 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 

1989 1990 

Photocopying Machine $3,291.00 $3,672.70 

Firearms Permit 4,733.00 2,299.00 

Bicycle Registrations 1.00 5.50 

Firearms Identification Cards 356.00 382.00 

Court Fines 245,882.50 189,749.50 

Photographs 708.00 556.00 

Police Details -Service Charge. .43,191.07 38,388.46 

False Alarms 9,625.00 5,025.00 

Parking Fines 15,680.00 13,399.00 

Restitution . .6,065.00 990.00 

Total Receipts returned to the 

Town $329,532.57 $254,467.16 

ARRESTS 

1989 1990 

Crimes Against Persons 75 52 

Crimes Against Property 189 196 

Crimes Against Public Order 342 235 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

1989 1990 

Fines 68 77 

Placed on Probation 34 20 

Suspended Sentence/ Placed on File ... 12 16 

Placed on File 73 7 

Not Guilty Finding 3 6 

Dismissed With Probable Cause 4 9 

Court Costs & Continued Without 

A Finding 38 27 

Committed to Youth Services Board .... 5 4 

Committed to M.C.I. Cedar Junction .2 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 1 

Committed to House of Correction, 

Billerica 16 25 

Turned Over to Other Courts/P.D.'s . . 103 122 

Cases Pending & Continued in Court . 216 163 

Placed in Alcohol Safety Program .... 20 23 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1989 1990 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 13,187 15,451 

Summons Served 717 653 

Licenses Suspended/ Revoked 293 385 

Accidents Reported 1,479 1,218 

Personal Injury Accidents 273 239 

Fatal Accidents 3 3 

Mileage on Cruisers 475,416 503,518 

Station Lockups 606 483 

Citations Issued 4,545 3,221 

Parking Violations 1,329 636 

Doors/Windows Found Open 69 82 

Protective Custody/Detoxification Unit 83 68 

Restraining Orders Served 71 84 

GEORGE L. HANNA AWARD 

Three Chelmsford Police Officers were honored this past 
July when they won the State's highest award for heroism. 
In ceremonies at the State House in Boston, Goveror 
Michael Dukakis presented the 1989 Annual Trooper 
George L. Hanna award to Officers John Redican, Michael 
Stott and Joseph R. Gamache for the bullet-riddled chase 
and capture, at the risk of their own lives, of all four 
gunmen, as well as the recovery of the entire $300,000 taken 
in the shooting of a guard and armed robbery of a Wells 
Fargo Armored Truck in Chelmsford. 

SERGEANT RETIRES 

Sergeant Leslie "Buddy" Adams retired from the Police 
Department this past June following 41 years of police ser- 
vice with the Town. 

CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

With the appointments of Frederick F. Flynn and Brian 
Fernald this past year, the police department reached its 
total complement of four (4) full-time civilian dispatchers, 
in accordance with a previous town-union bargaining 
agreement. 

POLICE STORAGE FACILITY 

The police department expresses its sincerest apprecia- 
tion to the 3245 Civil Engineering Squadron, U.S. Air 
Force, Hanscom Air Base, Bedford, Mass., for the building 
of a 20' x 30' police storage facility on the grounds of the 
station at no labor cost to the town. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT LAY-OFFS 

As a result of severe budgetary constraints, the police 
department was forced to lay-off three sworn police officers 
and one non-sworn clerk. Those layed-off were Officers 
Mark St. Hilaire, Daniel Houston, David MacKenzie and 
Clerk Donna Fox. 

The efforts of this department served to generate the sum 
of $254,467.16 which reverted back into the general fund 
of the Town. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to the 
Board of Selectmen, Town Manager and all town officials, 
departments, and committees for the excellent coopera- 
tion given to the Police Department and also congratulate 
all police and civilian personnel of this department for once 
again, maintaining their high performance standards. 



95 



AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

This past year the Auxiliary continued to expand our 
training program for our officers. All Auxiliary Officers 
have been recertified in CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscita- 
tion) First Aid and Firearms. This past year, Auxiliary Of- 
ficers assisted the town at numerous events such as The John 
Carson Road Race, Memorial Day Parade, Flag Day 
Ceremonies, Middlesex County Kennel Club Dog Show, 
Town Clean Up Day, Chelmsford High School Graduation 
exercises, July 3rd festivities, July 4th Parade, Vietnam 
Veterans Day, Halloween, and Thanksgiving Football 
security for the schools. 

Operation House Check was in operation on 296 nights. 
The statistics were: vacant house checks 4,100, school 
checks 12,800, town property checks, 18,860 for a total of 
35,760. The men and women of the Auxiliary over the last 
year have donated to the town a total of 16,109 man hours 
performing their duties. The Auxiliary continues to spon- 
sor the Explorer Scout Law Enforcement Post #370 and we 
assist them with training and planning their activities. The 
young men and women of the post have assisted the Aux- 
iliary at every event and I would like to thank them for 
all their help over the past year. The Auxiliary Officers 
assisted the regular officers at numerous accident scenes 
and also assisted the department with the sewer construc- 
tion details for traffic control. 



James Spinney 
Timothy Swissler 
Michael Taplin 



William Vaughn 
Craig Walsh 



OFFICE OF THE DOG OFFICER 

Report of the Dog Officer for 1990. 

1. Citizen complaints answered 1,129 

2. Dogs picked up and taken to pound 64 

3. Violation citations issued 

4. Value of citation fines $250.00 

5. Funds turned into town for boarding and 

other fees collected $820.00 

6. Dead animals picked up from streets 231 

7. Stray dogs disposed of 39 

8. Dogs returned to owners 25 

Miles traveled 12,091 

Number of dogs licensed 3,001 

Animal bites reported 23 



The recent fiscal crisis in town has effected the Auxiliary 
as well and it is our hope that the Auxiliary Unit will re- 
main intact. The men and women of the Unit are without 
question some of the most dedicated people I have ever 
had the pleasure of working with. 

I would like to thank the members of the Auxiliary and 
their families for donating so much of their time to make 
Chelmsford a better place to live. I would like to thank the 
Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager for their sup- 
port, the Chief and Deputy Chief and the Officers of the 
Police Department for their assistance and support over 
the past year, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 

Auxiliary Roster 

Director — Sgt. Raymond C. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 

Auxiliary Officers 

John Bell John Paton 

Joseph Eriksen Bradford Poole 

Charles Emerson Edward Quinn 

Eric Gordon James Quinn 

David Irvine Ralph Roscoe 

Michael Koenig Kevin Ross 

David Leo John Roberts 

Peter LoPilato Daniel McLarney 

Kim Martin Erik Merrill 

Steven Manning John Oczkowski 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members 

Robert Kydd, Chairman 
Gustave Fallgren, Vice Chairman 
Daniel Burke, Clerk 
Eileen Duffy 
Harold Organ, Jr. 

Alternates 

Robert Scharn Karen Wharton Ronald Pare 

Secretary 

Marjorie Hennessy 



Hearing Statistics: 

Variances 
Special Permits 

Total 



Total Granted Denied 

39 32 7 

34 24 10 



73 



56 



17 



I would like to thank the Board for the time and effort 
put into re-drafting new rules and regulations that ap- 
pellants would receive to instruct them on the procedure 
and materials needed for appearance before the Board of 
Appeals. 



96 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



Members: Harold J. Linnerud, Chairman 
Harold Davis - Vice Chairman 
Paul J. Canniff 
Richard O. Lahue 
John P. Richardson 

Aternate: Robert LaPorte 

Clerk: Mary E. Caffelle 

Meetings: The first Monday of each month at the 1 802 
Schoolhouse. Special meetings when and where required. 

During the past year the Historic District Commission 
accepted 25 applications for Certificates of Ap- 
propriateness. Public hearings were scheduled for 12 of 
these, to permit public input. The remaining 13 were 
deemed to have an insubstantial effect on the District. For 
these, hearings were waived and abutters were notified by 
mail. 



Community involvement in advising the Commission 
when wetlands transgressions begin to happen has been a 
tremendous help in assisting the Commission with the pro- 
tection of the Town's wetland areas. Cooperation between 
Town Boards has enabled the Commission to inform a 
developer at the beginning stages of the development that 
a filing with the Commission would be necessary. This helps 
to avoid costly and unnecessary expenses on the part of 
the town and the developer. 

We have up-graded The Deep Brook Reservation and 
re-named it The Bill Edge Deep Brook Reservation. A new 
parking lot has been constructed and a new sign has been 
installed. We wish the public to utilize the reservations in 
Town. 

We are now in the engineering stages of converting the 
Crooked Spring Brook Reservation to be entirely accessible 
to the handicapped including all trails and fishing areas. 
This project will take approximately two years to finish. 



These applications resulted in the issuance of 20 
Certificates of Appropriateness and 5 Certificates of 
Non- Applicability or Hardship. No applications were 
denied. 

The members of the Historic District Commission con- 
tinue to work with property owners within the Historic 
District to protect and preserve the distinct character of 
the district. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 







Term 


Members 


Responsibilities 


Exp. 


James H. McBride 


Chairman 


1992 


David J. McLachlan 


Clerk & Wetlands 


1992 


Karen G. Flynn 


Wetlands 


1992 


W. Robert Greenwood 


Wetlands 


1991 


Charles Galloway 


Reservation Mgt. 


1991 


John D. Scott 


Wetlands 


1991 


John Droescher 


Wetlands 


1993 


Marjorie Hennessy 


Secretary 





The Conservation Commission continues to keep as its 
primary goal the preservation of the natural and desirable 
aspects of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The duties associated with the local administration of 
the Wetlands Protection Act easily absorb most of the time 
and effort of the Commission members. A total of twenty- 
five public hearings were held this year in accordance with 
Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. After careful review of each proposed plan, the 
Commission issued twenty-two Orders of Conditions, two 
were withdrawn and one is continued. Eleven hearings were 
also held for Determination of Applicability of the 
Wetlands Protection Act and nine Negative and two 
Positive Determinations were issued. 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Gone are the days when a Senior Center was just a 
meeting place for knitting and socials. Today's Center is 
an important and vital component of older living. Last year 
we: 

• provided some type of medical care (blood pressure 
test, flu shots, podiatry and cholesterol clinics) for 
1,100 residents 

• presented medical, dental and legal lectures for over 
1,500 people 

• transported 385 people on nearly 5,000 trips to 
hospitals, doctors' offices, daycare centers, nutrition 
program and shopping 

• worked with Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley 
to provide home care for 145 seniors 

• assisted 65 families with Respite Care for 1,634 units 
of service 

• provided 24,000 nutritious meals through the State's 
extended lunch program 

• visited hundreds of shut-ins on a regular basis 

• worked with the students of Chelmsford High School 
and the Thomas Jefferson Forum to present the Senior 
Olympics, Senior Day and a "Senior" Prom 

• provided tax and fuel assistance for 261 residents 

• delivered 12,000 meals to homebound elders through 
Meals on Wheels Program 

• edited, printed and mailed our monthly newsletter 
to each of the 3,200 senior households 

• developed an Alzheimer's Support Group for 
caregivers 

And these are just some of the human services. We were 
also busy fundraising to pay for the additional costs 
associated with operating the new building. The seniors 
through our non-profit group, the Friends of the Senior 



97 



Center, Inc., are committed to paying $3,000 each month 
to the Town. This money pays for heat, lights, and our part- 
time custodial staff. 

Submitted by 

Martin J. Walsh, Director 
for the Chelmsford C.O.A. 

Current COA Members 

Annette Holtzman, Chairperson 

Robert Clough, Vice Chairperson 

C. Wilbur Davis 

Gene Raby 

Lois Manty 

Verne Woodward 

Franchon Larson 

Jean Mark 

Albert Leman 

Mary Conti 

Current Directors of the Friends 

Donna Johnson, President 
Helen Palmgren, Treasurer 
Ann Bucciarelli, Clerk 
Robert Clough 
Howard Moore 
Joseph McPhillips 
Joseph Shanahan, Jr. 
Annette Holtzman 
Charles H. Holtzman 



In 1990, 24 grant proposals were either partially or ful- 
ly funded by the Cultural Council. Grant applications rang- 
ed from a documentary film and videotape exploring the 
roots of Irish traditional folk music, publication of the 
History of the Chelmsford/Carlisle cranberry bog and sum- 
mer concerts and art festivals to the 300th anniversary 
celebration of the Chelmsford Garrison House. 

Another facet of the Mass. Arts Lottery funding is 
P. A.S.S. (Performing Arts Students' Series). This program 
provides funds for the school-aged children (K-12) of the 
Town to attend performing arts events. Initiated in 
November, 1986, the program is increasing in popularity 
with both elementary and secondary teachers taking ad- 
vantage of the funds to attend musical and theatrical events 
with their students. 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is also closely involved 
with the functioning of the Old Town Hall that serves as 
Chelmsford's Cultural Center. Town based organizations use 
the Hall for special events or for regular rehearsals and 
meetings. 

Other accomplishments this year include: An Open 
Forum for Arts Lottery applicants to assist them in writing 
State grants; the Chelmsford Cultural Council brochure; 
participation at the Art Society's annual Art & Craft Show, 
the Earth Day celebration and a Statewide meeting of local 
councils in Harvard, Ma. 

The Council hired a new Administrator, Pat Fitzpatrick. 
The resignation of Evelyn Newman was regretfully ac- 
cepted. In 1991 the Cultural Council will sponsor a 
workshop entitled "Supporting the Arts: A Challenge for 
the 1990s." Because State funding has been cut, there will 
be only one funding cycle. Future projects include the in- 
stallation of a sound system at the Old Town Hall. 



CHELMSFORD CULTURAL COUNCIL 



Members: 

Joyce D. McKenzie 
Bette Gagnon 
Jeffrey Brem 
Standra Stewich 
Karen Leonard 
Eleanor Bragdon 
Margrit Mason 
James Turcotte 
Edie Copenhaver 
Pat Fitzpatrick 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Chairperson 
Vice-Chairperson 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



Administrator 



Ron Zylich 
Robert Hayes 
Michael Ablove 
Robert Charpentier 
Paul Murphy 
Evelyn Newman 
Dennis Sullivan 
Lorraine Murphy 



MEMBERS 

Chairman 
Vice Chairman 



Clerk 



Meetings: 

1st Monday of the Month 
Twice a month during Arts Lottery reviews 

The principal function of the Chelmsford Cultural 
Council is to administer funds allocated to the Town of 
Chelmsford by the Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council. 
Grant applications are available to non-profit cultural 
organizations for projects benefiting the Chelmsford 
community. 



The Summer of 1990 was a great challenge to the 
Recreation Commission. Like all Town Departments, 
Recreation suffered from the budget crunch. Our budget 
was completely eliminated except for the salary of the part- 
time clerk. Our goal at that time was to maintain our 
Summer Program on a self-supporting basis. 

Realizing the tremendous challenge, Recreation hired 
a very competent staff with Jon Aronie as our Interim 
Summer Director. This innovative, energetic, dedicated 



98 



young man, came up with a summer program, not only 
maintaining present programs, but introduced some new 
programs, all self supporting. 

With the elimination of our budget, our limited 
appropriations to Sports Organizations, Patchwork, Com- 
munity Band and Club 365 were discontinued. 

In order to be self supporting, fees had to be doubled, 
and the residents in Chelmsford responded positively in 
spite of their pocketbooks. 

Our Summer Programs included tennis lessons, swim- 
ming lessons, track and field, our playground program was 
replaced with a 6 week Day Camp. Added to these basic 
programs in 1990 we added a water adjustment program 
for 3 & 4 year olds, and an advanced tennis program for 
teenagers. 

To facilitate the development of new youth sports camps, 
Recreation, in conjunction with Office of Community 
Education and the High School Athletic Office, im- 
plemented a standard policy under which not-for-profit 
summer sports camps receive the benefit of Recreation 
Commission sponsorship. In return for this sponsorship, a 
camp must pay a per child fee and submit a financial 
accounting. These camps include Field Hockey, Wrestling, 
Football, Girls Basketball, Varsity Basketball, Youth Soccer, 
and John Doherty Baseball Clinic. Tom Caito was our 
Camp Coordinator and did his usual fantastic job. 

Our Annual Activities Fair has grown and is a convenient 
way for parents to register their children in the various 
programs and camps at one place. The cost of the Activities 
Fair is absorbed by a grant from CADAC (Community 
Alcohol and Drug Awareness Committee). 

When the Jaycees decided to hold their road race on a 
date other than Fourth of July, Recreation stepped in and 
with the help of Walter Hedlund, Chairman of Celebra- 
tions Committee, financial support from Sully's Ice Cream, 
and help from a few local runners, preserved a long- 
standing Chelmsford tradition and organized the Fourth 
of July Road Race. 

Recreation sponsored a Whiffleball Tournament proposed 
by Jim Duff to aid the Chelmsford High School Athletic 
Fund. This was held under the lights at Southwell Field, 
ten teams registered. This resulted in $450 for the High 
School. 

An interesting and very useful program for 1990 was the 
Workreation Volunteer Program. Young Chelmsford 
residents volunteered their time to helping in various areas. 
These youngsters helped in beach maintenance, checking 
residency at the beach, helped with the children in day 
camp. They did a terrific job and should be commended 
for their dedication. 

Free billiards lessons were offered to Chelmsford youth 
for the month of August by Country Club USA of 
Chelmsford. This was enthusiastically accepted by 45 
Chelmsford youth. 



Club 365 had a successful two week day camp during 
August at the Freeman Lake complex. Club 365 is a year 
round activities club for children with special needs. Their 
summer day camp is integrated. 



SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

With the defeat of the trash override, a user fee for trash 
collection was instituted. The user fee had 2 parts: 

1) An Annual Bill: All residences receiving town trash 
service received an annual bill which covered the fix- 
ed costs of administration and curbside collection of 
trash. This bill was $74.00 in FY91 ($70.00 for the 
annual fee plus $4.00 for the 4 tags included with 
the bill). 

2) A Tag Fee: Residents purchased sticky tags and at- 
tached one tag to each regular trash item put out for 
collection. The tags cost $1.00 and covered the cost 
of disposal of the trash the tag was attached to. 

The trash user fee did not include the costs for the 4 
bulk collections and bulk disposal, the curbside recycling 
program, and the collection and composting of leaves in 
the fall. 

Bulk collection was set up as a separate user fee that any 
1-3 family household could use, even those contracting 
privately for weekly trash collection. Residents purchased 
a $7.00 tag for each bulk item. 

Recycling and leaf collections remained in the budget, 
available to all 1-3 family households. Laidlaw bought the 
recycling contract from Environmental Ideas/a Vining 
Company, effective January 1, 1991. The Solid Waste Ad- 
visory Committee looked into the feasibility of including 
multi-family housing complexes in the recycling program. 



VETERANS' 
EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

As Chairman of the Veterans' Emergency Fund Com- 
mittee, I hereby submit our Forty-Third Annual Report to 
the Officers and Residents of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Fund, for the first time since its establishment in 
1947, has reached a total of $15,507.91. Our investments 
consist of a regular savings account, for easy access when 
funds are needed to assist a veteran, and two Certificates 
of Deposit, both earning at an annual yield of slightly more 
than eight percent. We have prepared a financial report 
which will also will appear in the Annual Town Report. 



99 



The financial records and bank books have been 
transferred to the custody of the Town Treasurer, a new re- 
quirement under the recently enacted Town Charter plan. 
We are most grateful for the kind assistance offered to the 
committee by the Treasurer and Assistant Treasurer. 

It was not necessary to hold any committee meetings dur- 
ing 1990 since no applications for assistance were receiv- 
ed. Veterans of World War II are given assistance in the 
form of material grants, such as rent, fuel and light, 
clothing and medical needs. Applications for assistance are 
first referred to the Town Veterans' Agent for an initial in- 
vestigation to determine eligibility. 

Present members; one from each voting precinct, are 
listed as follows: 



Account No. 44-0007431 6.487 62 

Total Assets 15,507.91 

Total Liabilities None 

Total Assets. Less Liabilities as of December 31, 1990: $15,507.91 



Precinct 1: 
Precinct 2: 
Precinct 3: 
Precinct 4: 
Precinct 5: 
Precinct 6: 
Precinct 7: 
Precinct 8: 
Precinct 9: 



Russell E. Starck 
Russell E. Butterfield 
James J. Walker 
John J. McNulty 
George F. Waite 
Alfred H. Coburn 
Robert T Clough 
Thomas F. Balfrey 
Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 



The Committee Members extend their appreciation to 
the various town officers, the Veterans Agent and staff, and 
to other town employees who have helped the committee 
in the past. 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 

and the Town Manager 

January 1st, 1990 through December 31st, 1990 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 199 
Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank. Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings 
Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest 

The Comfed Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: 

Total Interest Received: 



Add Transfer: 
From Comfed Savings Bank to Central Savings Bank . 
Total Balance on Hand and Interest and Transfer: , , . 



Deduct Disbursements 

Transfer to Central Savings Bank from Comfed Savings Bank: 

Balance on Hand as of December 31st, 1990 



Central Savings Bank 

Account No. 128790 

Central Savings Bank 

Account No. 2-30-205569 . . . 
Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank 



Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee, 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



CHELMSFORD COMMISSION ON 
HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS 

The Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 
was established by the Board of Selectmen in the fall of 
1986. The Commission is also associated with the State Of- 
fice of Disabilities. 

The purpose of the Commission as defined by our Char- 
ter is to "act as a centralizing force in the Town of 
Chelmsford which will deal with all handicapped issues," 
"to assure no qualified individual with a handicap in the 
Town of Chelmsford shall solely by reason of his or her 
handicap. ..be subjected to discrimination," and "to coor- 
dinate and carry out the programs of the State Office of 
Disabilities." 

Our meetings are open to the public. They are held the 
second Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. 

Paul Logan, Chairman 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A., Chairman 

Ruth K. Delaney, M.A.A. Richard Tevlin 

Nancy L. Maher, Assistant to the Assessors 

Marie Ronan, Principal Clerk 

Elaine McBride, Principal Clerk 

Elaine Meyers, Senior Clerk 

Fiscal Year 1990 was a challenging one for the Assessor's 
Office. The town voted to go to quarterly bills, which in- 
creased our work load. Except for the printing of tax bills, 
all computer work is now being done in-house. 

Due to the failing economy, requests for abatements in- 
creased over last year, and it looks as if the trend will con- 
tinue for Fiscal Year 1991. 

The assessors would like to thank the staff who worked 
hard to keep the office running efficiently. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane Phillips, M.A.A. 

Ruth Delaney,. M.A.A. 

Richard Tevlin 



100 

INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointments to Town Committees 103 

Appointed Town Officials 83 

Board of Appeals 95 

Board of Assessors 99 

Board of Health 66 

Board of Registrars 5 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 99 

Conservation Commission 96 

Council on Aging 96 

Cultural Council 97 

Department of Public Works 65 

Dog Officer 95 

Elected Town Officials 64 

Fire Department 92 

General Information 2 

Historic District Commission 96 

Housing Authority 68 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 70 

Personnel Board 68 

Planning Board 70 

Police Department 93 

Police Auxiliary 95 

Public Libraries 69 

Recreation Commission 97 

School Committee 72 

Sewer Commission 81 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 98 

Town Accountant 84 

Town Clerk 5 

Warrant for Special State Primary Election— April 3, 1990 6 

Special State Primary Election Results 6 

Annual Town Election Results 8 

Special Town Meeting -April 23, 1990 9 

Warrant for Special State Election — May 1, 1990 15 

Results of Special State Election — May 1, 1990 15 

Warrant for Special Town Election — May 1, 1990 16 

Results of Special Town Election — May 1, 1990 16 

Annual Town Meeting— June 4, 1990 17 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— June 11, 1990 21 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— June 18, 1990 25 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting— June 20, 1990 28 

Special Town Meeting-July 23, 1990 32 

Warrant for State Primary Election — September 18, 1990 35 

Results of State Republican Primary Election 38 

Results of State Democratic Primary Results 36 

Annual Town Meeting— October 1, 1990 40 

Warrant for State Election — November 6, 1990 54 

State Election Results — November 6, 1990 57 

Special Town Meeting — December 3, 1990 60 

Representative Town Meeting Members , 63 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Town Manager 4 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 91 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 98 

Veterans' Services 99 



NOTES 



NOTES 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMFORD, MASS. 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, 
please fill out this form and mail to: Town Manager, Town Offices, 
50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824. The filling out of this 
form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular 
capacity. 

NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE 

ADDRESS AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting 250-5215 

Assessors 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 
Building Inspector 250-5225 

(Yard Sales, Kennel & Bldg. Permits) 

Cemetery 250-5245 

Community Teamwork 459-0551 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 

Council on Aging 256-0013 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5265 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

High School 251-8729 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Mass. Electric Co 458-1431 

Park Dept. Garage 256-5073 

Planning Board Clerk 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

(8:30 am-12:30 pm) 

Registry of Deeds (Lowell) 458-8474 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 459-9397 

School Administration 251-4981 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 250-5238 

Water Dept 256-2381 

Welcome Wagon, Billerica 663-4030 

Welfare, Lowell 454-8061 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 

24-hr. Junior Hotline 1-800-792-5117 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1: Town Offices Gym 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 4: Westlands School 
Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: Westlands School 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 9: Town Offices Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
1 202-224-4543 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 

Boston, MA 02116 

362 Russell Office Building 

Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Chester G. Atkins 

1429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, D.C. 20515 
508-459-0101 (Lowell) Post Office 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 36 State House 

Boston, Ma 02133 617-722-2552 

Home: 4 Arbutus Ave. , Chelmsford 

508-256-5043 

State Senator Lucile C. Hicks 

Room 413G State House 
Boston, MA 02133 

Middlesex County Commissioners 
Superior Courthouse 494-4100 
East Cambridge, MA 02141